BREED INFORMATION

Oriental Shorthair

Personality:
  • Enthusiastic, energetic, and curious.

  • Devoted and loving, especially to...

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Personality:
  • Enthusiastic, energetic, and curious.

  • Devoted and loving, especially to their one special human.

  • Voices are usually softer and milder than a Siamese.

  • Known to enjoy riding on the shoulders of their people.

  • Usually prefer to bond with one human.

History:

Siamese hybrid that was developed in the 1950′s and 1960′s by breeders who wanted a cat that looked and acted like a Siamese but with a wide range of colors (without the traditional Siamese points).  Siamese were crossed with domestic shorthairs, Russian Blues, and Abyssinians to create the new look and then bred back to Siamese to maintain the Siamese body and personality type.  Although initially resisted by Siamese purists, the breed was accepted for championship by the Cat Fanciers’ Associaton (CFA) in 1977.

Body Type:
  • Medium-sized and svelte with a distinctive combination of fine bones and firm muscles.

  • Head is a long-tapering wedge with large pointed ears.

  • Green eyes are medium size and almond shaped (only white Orientals may be either blue, green or odd-eyed).

Coat:
  • Coat is short, fine, and glossy.

  • Over 300 color and pattern combinations.  Colors include solids (blue, chestnut, cinnamon, cream, ebony, fawn, lavender, red and white), smoke (all colors and combinations of colors with a white undercoat that lies close to the skin), shaded (similar to the smoke colors but the white undercoat extends farther up the hair shaft making the coat appear to sparkle), and parti-color and bi-color (blue-cream, fawn-cream, lavender-cream, cinnamon tortoiseshell, chestnut tortoiseshell & ebony tortoiseshell).

Health and Wellness:
  • Since the Oriental Shorthair is a hybrid with Siamese in their background, they sometimes have kinked tails and/or crossed eyes.  These defects do not affect the well being of the cat, but are grounds for disqualification in the show ring.

  • Some lines have problems with gingivitis. Preventive dental care and early detection can keep this condition under control.

What you should know:
  • Can easily be taught to fetch and usually enjoy riding in the car.

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Papillon

Other names:
  • Butterfly Dog

  • Continental Spaniel

Country/Date of origin:
  • Belgium

  • ...
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Other names:
  • Butterfly Dog

  • Continental Spaniel

Country/Date of origin:
  • Belgium

  • 1500′s

Height:
  • 8 to 11 inches

Weight:
  • 8 to 10 pounds

Personality:
  • Loves to be pampered.

  • Bright and active.

  • Gets along well with other pets and loves to be around people.

  • Craves companionship.

  • Can be assertive if it is threatened or stressed.

  • Very protective, and because of its tendency to bark an alarm, is a good watchdog.

History:

Ladies of the French and Italian courts fancied the little spaniels, which were originally drop eared (see Phalene).  Both Marie Antoinette and Madame de Pompadour helped to make the breed fashionable.  The dwarf spaniels were carried to England and then to the United States.  The breed was accepted into the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1935.

Body Type:
  • A miniature spaniel, whose appearance is said to resemble a butterfly.

  • The erect ears are not altered.

  • The plume of a tail, carried jauntily across the back, is not altered.

Coat:
  • Long, silky, single coat.

  • Hair is exceptionally long on the tail and chest.

  • Must be primarily white but has to have patches of color covering the ears and eyes.

  • Additional patches of color on the body are allowed.

  • Moderate grooming.

Health and Wellness:
  • Congenital deafness.

  • Patella luxation.

  • Periodontal disease.

What you should know:
  • Papillon means butterfly in French.

  • The fringed ears and face markings are supposed to resemble a butterfly; and, the bouncing, flitting gait of the dogs reinforces the resemblance.

  • Phalenes and Papillons may be born in the same litter.

  • Dainty and clean.

  • Easily housebroken.

  • Requires little exercise.

  • Recommended for apartment living or for older people.

  • The Papillon’s original use was as a ladies companion.

  • It has never had any job other than to grace the home and heart.

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Pekingese

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Little Lion Dog

  • Sleeve Dog

  • Sun Dog

  • Imperial Dog of China

  • ...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Little Lion Dog

  • Sleeve Dog

  • Sun Dog

  • Imperial Dog of China

  • Peke

Country/Date of origin:
  • China

  • Tang Dynasty (5th Century)

Height:
  • 8 to 9 inches

  • Teacup toy version is several inches shorter

Weight:
  • Up to 14 pounds

  • Teacup toy version is several pounds smaller

     
Personality:
  • Pekingese are courageous and bold, all out of proportion to their size.

  • Dignified, independent, and aloof to the point of being snobbish.

  • Prefers the company of adults.

History:

Pekingese were originally considered sacred, the living symbols of the lion that was Buddha’s guardian.  They were the exclusive property of the Emperor and Empress of China.  Theft of a Pekingese was punishable by death.  The Chinese Royal Family often used Pekingese for hunting rabbits because of their excellent retriever abilities.  The first Pekingese dogs to leave the Imperial Palace were dog-napped by the British when they looted the Forbidden City after the Boxer Rebellion in 1860.  One of the dogs was presented to Queen Victoria, who named him Looty.  The tiny oriental dogs were an immediate sensation in Europe.  Soon, they were also in the United States and the breed was registered by the American Kennel Club(AKC) in 1909.

Body Type:
  • A stocky, heavily-coated dog that was bred to resemble a lion.

  • Face is extremely short with very large, round eyes.

  • Head is oversized and flat between the ears.

  • Short legs are bowed in front giving the Pekingese a distinctive sideways roll when moving.

  • Feathered ears hang down and are not altered.

  • Tail forms a plumed curl over the back and is not altered.

Coat:
  • Long, thick, double coat has soft undercoat with a longer top coat (guard hairs) that give the coat a plush, stand-offish effect.

  • Hair is extra long on toes and tail, with neck ruff forming a lion’s mane.

  • All colors allowable, with black masks and spectacle markings highly prized.

Health and Wellness:
  • Cleft lip and palate.

  • Brachycephalic airway obstruction syndrome.

  • Microphthalmia.

  • Epiphora.

  • Dystocia.

  • Intevertebral disc disease (IVDD).

  • Atlanto-axial subluxation.

  • Facial skin fold pyoderma.

  • Mitral insufficiency.

  • Keratoconjunctivitis sicca.

What you should know:
  • Extremely long-lived breed.  Note that Pekingese is spelled with a g.  It is commonly mis-spelled as Pekinese.

  • There are two sizes of Pekingese:  the small versions are known as sleeve dogs or teacup toys.  The larger version, however, is more commonly seen and has a sturdier constitution.

  • White, teacup, toy Pekingese are highly prized and fetch astronomical prices.  One was recently sold for $50,000.

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Persian

Personality:
  • Sweet, gentle, and responsive.

  • Prefer atmosphere of serenity and...

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Personality:
  • Sweet, gentle, and responsive.

  • Prefer atmosphere of serenity and security.

History:

Legend states that the cat originated in Persia and Iran as long ago as 1684 B.C. and that they were considered as precious as spices and jewels.  Around the turn of the century, breeders crossed Persians with Angoras in order to develop a cat with a silkier, longer coat.  The wide variety of colors found in modern day Persians is the result of crossings with other breeds of cats.  Accepted for championship status in all breed associations.

Body Type:
  • Medium to large, cobby body with heavy bones, short legs, and deep chest.

  • Head is round and massive with a short, broad, snub nose.

  • Ears are small and round tipped.

  • Eyes are brilliant in color (color depends on coat color), large and round.

Coat:
  • Coat is long, thick, fine textured, and glossy with a full ruff and bushy tail.

  • Over 50 colors and patterns including solids, shadeds, smokes, tabbies, parti-color, bi-color and himalayan (pointed).

Health and Wellness:
  • Neonatal isoerythrolysis.

  • Congenital epiphora.

  • Chediak-Higashi disease.

  • Polycystic kidney disease (PKD).

  • Dermatophytosis.

  • Stenotic nares.

  • Skin fold pyoderma.

  • Stud tail.

  • Possible hip dysplasia.

What you should know:
  • Number one cat in popularity in the United States.

  • In The International Cat Association (TICA), a pointed Persian (Himalayan) is considered as a separate breed.

  • In the Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA), Himalayans are considered as a color division of the Persian breed.

  • Do not select a Persian as a pet unless you are willing to take time to do the daily grooming necessary to maintain the coat.

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Pharaoh Hound

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Kelb-tal-fewek

Country/Date of origin:
  • Malta

  • 1000 BC

...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Kelb-tal-fewek

Country/Date of origin:
  • Malta

  • 1000 BC

Height:
  • Females:  21 to 24 inches

  • Males:  23 to 25 inches

Weight:
  • 45 to 55 pounds

Personality:
  • Fun-loving and affectionate with family.

  • Standoffish with strangers.

  • Does not make a good watch dog.

  • Intelligent but not easy to train.

  • Playful in nature and gentle mannered.

History:

There is no mistaking the striking resemblance of the Pharaoh Hound to the ancient Egyptian god, Anubis, guide of the dead.  The traceable history of the Pharaoh Hounds, however, lies in Malta where they are used for rabbit hunting.  The Maltese heritage is almost three thousand years old and it is thought that the dogs were purebred long before, having been brought to the island by Phoenician traders.  The agile sight-hunters remained in relative obscurity on the Mediterranean island until the late 1960′s when they began to attract an international following.  It was not accepted into the American Kennel Club (AKC) until 1983.

Body Type:
  • A racy courser that is a member of the greyhound family.

  • Nose, eyes, and body color are all about the same.

  • Large, erect ears are not altered.

  • White-tipped, tapering tail is not altered.

Coat:
  • Coat is short and glossy.

  • Minimal grooming.

  • Color is always tan.

  • A large white patch on the chest (called a star) is desirable.

  • White markings are permitted on the feet and tail tip.

Health and Wellness:
  • Relatively healthy.

  • Shares a sensitivity to anesthetics, flea collars, and many drugs with other member of the greyhound family.

  • Thin skin is susceptible to allergic disorders.

  • Bleeding disorders.

  • Heart disease.

What you should know:
  • Unlike the other members of the greyhound family, the Pharaoh Hound will overeat and get fat.

  • Said to be the only dog that blushes.

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Otterhound

Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • England

  • 11th century

...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • England

  • 11th century

Height:
  •  23 to 27 inches
     
Weight:
  • 65 to 120 pounds

Personality:
  • Affectionate and protective of master and family.

  • Because they are pack hounds, Otterhounds get along well with other dogs.

  • Amiable, but not too intelligent.

  • Rather difficult to train.

  • Because it is so active, the Otterhound is not recommended for apartment living.

History:

This hunting hound has a long history, but is short in numbers.  It was bred as a pack hunter to track and kill the river otter, which was considered vermin in England (because they were decimating the fish population in lakes and streams).  In the late 19th century, just before otter hunting was outlawed, there were more than 20 packs of Otterhounds that ran regularly.  The Otterhound hunts both on land and in water, tracking with a methodical thoroughness.  The breed has been recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) since 1910, but a puppy may be difficult to find.

Body Type:
  • A large, rough-coated hound that is about as long as it is tall.

  • Long, high-set tail is not altered.

  • Hairy, pendulous ears are not altered.

  • Feet are webbed for swimming

Coat:
  • Disheveled-looking coat is double layered.

  • The long guard hairs are rough and feel harsh to the touch.  The undercoat is dense, short, and woolly.  Together they provide great water protection.

  • Oily coat has a distinct smell.

  • Any color is allowed.

  • Mop of hair over its eyes gives this dog a friendly appearance.

  • Medium grooming required.

  • Tends to shed

Health and Wellness:
  • Extremely healthy breed.

  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Prone to ear canker.

What you should know:
  • Otterhounds have a voice.  Its powerful bay leads hunters on a musical chase.

  • Owners are treated to a running commentary on life in general.  The bay is not as frequent as the grumbles, sighs, and pleasure groans that it feels obligated to share with those around it.  However, a family with an Otterhound must be prepared for a starlight howl on occasion.

  • Nothing makes an Otterhound happier than swimming.

  • A very rare breed and a puppy may be difficult to find.

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Patterdale Terrier

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Fell Terrier

  • Black Fell Terrier

Country/Date of origin:
  • ...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Fell Terrier

  • Black Fell Terrier

Country/Date of origin:
  • Great Britain

  • 1700′s

Height:
  • 12 inches

Weight:
  • 11 to 13 pounds

Personality:
  • Enthusiastic worker.

  • Full of fire.

  • Can be quarrelsome with other dogs.

History:

This breed originated in the north of England and is named for a village there.  A hardy dog, it is able to get over the rough terrain known as fells, as well as go-to-ground.  It will first try to get its quarry to bolt from its burrow by barking, but will go in after it if necessary.  A no-frills, working dog, the Patterdale is game and hardy as any terrier going.  Most of the Patterdales are kept by masters of fox hunts or used as vermin exterminators.

Body Type:
  • A compact go-to-ground terrier that has a Staffordshire Bull Terrier type head.

  • The short tail is not altered.

  • The folded, triangular ears are not altered.

Coat:
  • Short, coarse, and weatherproof.

  • Allowed colors are black, red, chocolate, or black-and-tan.

  • Black is by far the most common color.

  • Moderate grooming required.

Health and Wellness:
  • Generally very hardy.

What you should know:
  • It is said that this dog is willing to hunt anything with fur.

  • As with all the terriers, be sure to get the upper-hand with this dog from the beginning.

  • High-energy level.

  • Can be destructive or noisy if not given proper exercise.

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Perro De Presa Canario

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Canary Islands Fighting Dog

Country/Date of origin:
  • Canary...

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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Canary Islands Fighting Dog

Country/Date of origin:
  • Canary Islands

  • 1800′s

Height:
  • 21 to 25 inches

Weight:
  • 84 to 106 pounds

Personality:
  • Very fierce and determined.

  • Intelligent.

  • Its admirers claim that it is even-tempered with family members.

History:

Developed by crossing native island dogs with Mastiffs brought from Great Britain in the 19th century.  This dog was developed specifically for the purpose of dog-fighting.  This practice was banned in 1940, and for this reason the breed almost became extinct by the 1960′s.

Body Type:
  • A large, Mastiff-type dog.

  • The medium-long tail is carried low and is sometimes docked.

  • The small, folded ears are sometimes altered.

Coat:
  • Short and harsh in texture.

  • The allowed colors are various shades of brindle and solid fawn.

  • Minimal grooming required.

Health and Wellness:
  • Possible hip dysplasia.

What you should know:
  • It is wise to remember that this dog was bred solely for the purpose of fighting.

  • Obedience training is very highly recommended.

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Phalene

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Drop-eared Papillon

  • Espagneul Nain

  • Continental Spaniel

...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Drop-eared Papillon

  • Espagneul Nain

  • Continental Spaniel

Country/Date of origin:
  • Belgium

  • 1400′s

Height:
  • 8 to 11 inches

  • Anything over 12 inches is a disqualification.

Weight:
  • 8 to 10 pounds

Personality:
  • A happy disposition.

  • Gets along well with other pets and loves to be around people.  Craves companionship.

  • Can be assertive if it is threatened or stressed.

  • Very protective and, because of its tendency to bark an alarm, is a good watchdog.

History:

The progenitor of the Papillon, the Phalene made its dainty way into the hands of French royal ladies via Italy and possibly Spain.  The Phalene came to its refined flowering at the French court of Louis XIV in the 17th century.  The dwarf spaniels were carried to England and then to the United States.  The breed was accepted into the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1935 (see Papillon).

Body Type:
  • A miniature Spaniel in appearance.

  • The pendant ears are not altered.

  • The plume tail is carried jauntily across the back and is not altered.

Coat:
  • Long, silky, single coat.

  • Hair is exceptionally long on the tail.

  • Must be primarily white but has to have patches of color covering the ears and eyes.  Additional patches of color on the body are allowed.

  • Moderate grooming.

Health and Wellness:
  • Sturdy and healthy in spite of its delicate appearance.

  • Slipped patella which gives the gait a hop-and-a-skip appearance.

  • Low blood sugar.

What you should know:
  • Phalenes and Papillons may be born in the same litter.

  • Dainty and clean.  Easily housebroken.

  • Requires little exercise.

  • Recommended for apartment living or for older people.

  • The Phalene’s original use was as a ladies companion.

  • It has never had any job other than to grace the home and heart.

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Podengo Pequeno

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Portuguese Rabbit Hound

  • Medium Portuguese Sight Hound

...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Portuguese Rabbit Hound

  • Medium Portuguese Sight Hound

Country/Date of origin:
  • Portugal

  • 1600′s

Height:
  • 15 to 22 inches

Weight:
  • 35 to 45 pounds

Personality:
  • Lively and alert.

  • Friendly.

  • Gets along well with other dogs.

  • A pack hunter.

  • Tends to roam.

History:

There are three native sight hounds in Portugal and they are all closely related.  Podengo (meaning running hound) are divided by size.  The largest, about 25 inches tall is used mostly for coursing hares.  The middle-sized Podengo, or Medio, is about 18 inches tall and is used to chase, catch, kill, and retrieve rabbits.  The smallest size, called the Pequeno, is a warren dog that is often used in concert with the Medio.  It is sent down the rabbit hole to flush the quarry to the waiting coursers.  The two larger size Podengos are hunted singly or in pairs, in the manner of Greyhounds.  The Pequeno is traditionally hunted in packs, like a beagle.  The Medio is a true sight hound.  The largest size is believed to be the original form, and it is thought that the other two sizes were bred down from it.

Body Type:
  • Resembles a miniature Ibizian Hound.

  • Rather long in back.

  • Medium-length tail is held low when dog is at rest and high (in a sickle shape) when it is alert.  It is not altered.

  • Ears are large, wide set, and especially mobile.  They are not altered.

Coat:
  • There are two coat varieties.  Both lack an undercoat.

  • The rough-coat Podengo’s coat is wiry, harsh, and of a medium length.  There is distinct feathering on the muzzle and longer hair over the back of the neck.

  • The short-haired Podengo’s coat is fine and glossy.

  • Colors are solid red, fawn, or yellow red with or without white markings or black shadings.

  • Fawn and white or yellow and black are the most common.

  • Moderate grooming.

Health and Wellness:
  • None that are known.

What you should know:
  • The most popular of the three sizes, the Medio is a very popular house pet in Portugal.

  • It adapts well to apartment life.

  • The Podengo will be difficult to find in the United States.

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Podengo Portugueso Medio

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Miniature Portuguese Rabbit Hound

  • Small Portuguese Warren...

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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Miniature Portuguese Rabbit Hound

  • Small Portuguese Warren Hound

Country/Date of origin:
  • Portugal

  • 1800′s

Height:
  • 8 to 11 inches

Weight:
  • 11 to 13 pounds

Personality:
  • Lively and alert.

  • Friendly.

  • Gets along well with other dogs.

  • A pack hunter.

  • Tends to roam.

History:

There are three native sight hounds in Portugal, all are closely related.  Podengo (meaning running hound) are divided by size.  The largest, about 25 inches is used mostly for coursing hares.  The middle size Podengo, or Medio, is about 18 inches tall and is used to chase, catch, kill, and retrieve rabbits.  The smallest size, called the Pequeno, is a warren dog that is often used in concert with the Medio.  It is sent down the rabbit hole to flush the quarry to the waiting coursers. The two larger size Podengos are hunted singly or in pairs, in the manner of Greyhounds.  The Pequeno is traditionally hunted in packs, like a Beagle.  The Pequeno is a true, miniature sighthound.  The largest size is believed to be the original form, and it is thought that the other two sizes were bred down from it. The Pequeno, most likely, has some terrier blood mixed in.

Body Type:
  • Resembles an over-sized and rather sturdy Chihuahua.

  • Rather long in back.

  • Medium-length tail is held low when dog is at rest and high (in a sickle shape) when it is alert.  It is not altered.

  • Ears are large, wide set, and especially mobile.  They are not altered.

Coat:
  • There are two coat varieties.  Both lack an undercoat.

  • The rough-coated Podengo’s coat is wiry, harsh, and of a medium length.  There is distinct feathering on the muzzle and longer hair over the back of the neck.

  • The short-haired Podengo’s coat is fine and glossy.

  • Colors are solid red, fawn, or yellow red with or without white markings or black shadings.

  • Fawn and white or yellow and black are the most common.

  • Moderate grooming.

Health and Wellness:
  • None that are known.

What you should know:
  • The Pequeno is a very popular house pet in Portugal.

  • It adapts well to apartment life.

  • The Podengo will be difficult to find in the United States.

  • Unusual for a hound, the Pequeno is a talented ratter.

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Pomeranian

other names/Nicknames:

  • Dwarf Spitz

  • Pom

Country/Date of origin:

  • Germany

  • 1800′s

  • ...
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other names/Nicknames:

  • Dwarf Spitz

  • Pom

Country/Date of origin:

  • Germany

  • 1800′s

Height:

  • 11 inches

Weight:

  • 3 to 7 pounds

  • 4 to 6 pounds for show specimans

Personality:

  • Very intelligent, alert, and curious.

  • Downright nosy.

  • Excitable nature, often accompanied by excessive barking.

  • Prefers the company of adults.

History:

Originally the Pomeranian was a much larger dog used for herding.  It was discovered in the Pomeranian region of Germany, from which it also derived its name.  It is a member of the Spitz family, which includes Samoyeds, Malamutes, and Chow Chows.  Through careful selection of breeding stock, the dog from Pomerania was reduced in size from 30 pounds to its present day weight.  The breed underwent most of the size reduction in Victorian England, but saw continued miniaturization in the 20th century.  The Pomeranian has been recognized in the United States since 1900.

Body Type:

  • A dwarf member of the Spitz family.

  • Erect, pricked-ears are not altered.

  • Upright tail tilts forward over the body.

  • Expression is described as foxy.

Coat:

  • A heavy, double coat that stands out from the body. The undercoat is short and thick, and the outercoat is longer and coarse.

  • The feel of the Pom’s coat is somewhat harsh.

  • Colors and combinations of colors are numerous.

  • Solids of any color are allowed with or without shadings of sable.

  • Parti-colors and black-and-tan bi-colors are also permitted.

  • Show classes are divided by color.

  • Red is the most commonly seen color.

  • The profuse coat takes three years to reach maturity.

  • Heavy shedding.

Health and Wellness:

  • Patent ductus arteriosis.

  • Hydrocephalus.

  • Patella luxation.

  • Cryptorchidism.

  • Juvenile hypoclycemia.

  • Epiphora.

  • Collapsing trachea.

  • Atlantoaxial subluxation.

  • Alopecia X.

  • Mitral insufficiency.

What you should know:

  • In the top ten of American Kennel Club (AKC) breeds.

  • The most popular toy dog in the United States.

  • Queen Victoria was a great champion of the breed.  The breed flourished in England during her reign.

  • Alert nature and tendency to bark at strange noises makes the Pom a tiny but capable watchdog.

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Portuguese Water Dog

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Cao de Agua

  • Portuguese Fishing Dog

  • Diving Dog

  • Sea Dog

...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Cao de Agua

  • Portuguese Fishing Dog

  • Diving Dog

  • Sea Dog

Country/Date of origin:
  • Portugal

  • 1400′s

Height:
  • Females:  17 to 21 inches (ideal is 19 inches)

  • Males:  20 to 23 inches (ideal is 22 inches)

Weight
  • Females:  35 to 50 pounds

  • Males:  42 to 60 pounds

Personality:
  • Willingness to work is inbred, and making itself useful obviously gives the dog great pleasure.

  • Loyal and attentive to its chosen person.

  • Alert and watches strangers for any sign of bad intentions.

History:

Fisherman along the Algarve coast of Portugal relied on a remarkable dog to help them in their difficult trade.  Their seafaring dogs carried messages between ships and ship-to-shore.  Indispensable crewmen, they retrieved lost tackle, herded fish into nets, grabbed those fish that leaped out, and in bad weather acted as living foghorns.  The Portuguese Water Dog is also a fine hunting retriever.  Needless to say, these dogs were closely guarded.  They were little known outside of Portugal until the 20th century, although the breed is more than seven hundred years old. They were not very well known in Portugal either. In 1972, it was thought that there were less than 25 purebred dogs left.  Fanciers around the world rallied and today the cheerful sea sprites have the popularity they deserve.  In 1981, the Portuguese was admitted to the Miscellaneous classes of the American Kennel Club (AKC).  In 1984, the numbers were high enough to allow a full membership in the Working Group.

Body Type:
  • Bears a resemblance to the large-size Poodle.

  • The medium-length, natural tail loops over the back when the dog is at attention.  It is not altered because it is used as a rudder when the dog is swimming.

  • The long ears hang close to the head and are not altered.

  • Feet are webbed to aid in swimming.

Coat:
  • Two coats allowed: curly and wavy.  An undercoat is not present in either variety.

  • Wavy coats are fairly long with a slight sheen.

  • The hair in curly coats forms compact, cylindrical curls that are somewhat lusterless.

  • The hair on the ears has less curl than elsewhere on the body.

  • Permissible colors are solid black, white or brown; also accepted are combinations of black or brown with white.

  • Two grooming styles.  Lion clip where the face, middle and hindquarters are shaved.  The tail is also shaved at the base end, and a lion-like tassel is left at the tip end. This clip requires professional grooming.  The working-retriever clip has the hair scissored to one-inch in length following the outline of the body.  Hair on the end of the tail is left long to emulate a lion’s tassel.

Health and Wellness:
  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Lysosomal storage disease.

  • Puppy eye syndrome.

  • Congenital renal disease.

  • Addison’s disease.

  • Follicular dysplasia.

  • Progressive retinal atrophy.

What you should know:
  • Pronounce it Kown-d -ahgwa (Cao de Agua) as the Portuguese do.  It means Dog of the Water or Sea Dog.

  • It is impossible to keep this dog out of water.  Some will even want to play in puddles.

  • Good choice as a family dog.

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Puli

Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Hungary

  • 900′s

Height:
  • 14...

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Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Hungary

  • 900′s

Height:
  • 14 to 19 inches

Weight:
  • 20 to 40 pounds

Personality:
  • Superior intelligence and a keen, work ethic.

  • Tends to be a one-man dog.

  • Wary of strangers.

  • High energy, always busy.

  • Noisy.

History:

Nomadic shepherds on the steppes of Hungary have kept two kinds of sheep dogs since the ninth century.  One was a big, white, guard dog that protected the flock at night and the other was a small, active, herding dog—the Puli—that actually herded the sheep by day.  They did not cross-breed the two types, and through the centuries, the unique characteristics of each became firmly fixed.  The Magyars did not pay much attention to the outward appearance of the Puli in regard to size, color, ear carriage, etc.  What they were interested in was the dog’s ability to work.  So intelligence and a willingness to please was prized above all.  The original Puli was multi-colored, in the literal sense of the word.  Over the years, more and more color variations were eliminated and by the 1940′s black were believed to be the only purebred Pulis.  Although today the blacks still predominate, there are white, gray, and apricot Pulis.  The latter two are quite rare.  Pulis were imported to the United States in the 1930′s.

Body Type:
  • It is hard to determine the body structure of a Puli, for it resembles nothing more than a string mop.

  • The tail is carried low and is not altered.

  • Hanging ears are not altered.

Coat:
  • The highly distinctive coat is traditionally corded and reaches the ground.

  • It is heavy in texture, with a fine undercoat.

  • Coats can form into matted ribbons or stringy cords.  Which coat the dog forms depends on the ratio of harsh outer coat and woolly undercoat.  A heavy outer coat forms the low maintenance cords, and heavy undercoat will form mats in a solid mass, or in wide or narrow ribbons.

  • Permissible colors are black, white, and rarely gray, or apricot.

  • Requires extensive care to keep debris from the cords or ribbons.

  • Puli hair is very unusual.  The diameter of each hair varies along its length.

Health and Wellness:
  • Generally robust.

  • Subject to hip dysplasia.

  • Eye inflammations caused by hair getting under eyelids.

What you should know:
  • Puli in Hungarian means sheepdog.

  • Pronounce it Poo-lee.  The plural of Puli is Pulik.

  • Unusually bouncy in its gait, the Puli moves like a bouncing ball.  It will dazzle you with its invisible footwork beneath the bobbing cords.

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Pyrenean Mastiff

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Mastin de los Pirineos

Country/Date of origin:
  • Spain

  • 3000...

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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Mastin de los Pirineos

Country/Date of origin:
  • Spain

  • 3000 BC

Height:
  • 28 to 34 inches

Weight:
  • 120 to 155 pounds

Personality:
  • Responsive and alert.

  • Protective of its home.

  • Not overly aggressive.

History:

This breed was developed in the region of the Pyrenean Mountains.  It is descended from Mastiff-type dogs that were brought to Spain by the ancient Phoenician traders.  Its primary use was that of a guard dog for livestock.  Still quite rare, at one time it was almost extinct.  The Pyrenean Mastiff is bigger and more massive than the much more popular Pyrenean Mountain Dog, to which it is closely related.

Body Type:
  • Looks similar to the Great Pyrenees Dog, although larger.

  • The moderately-long tail is carried low with a slight curve at the end.  It is not altered.

  • The hanging ears are not altered.

  • They are bigger than those of the Great Pyrenees.

  • Head of the Pyrenean Mastiff is more arched in the center than that of the Great Pyrenees.

Coat:
  • Thick, abundant, and of medium length.

  • The Pyrenean Mastiff has less feathering on the legs and shorter hair on the face and head than the Great Pyrenees.

  • The allowed color is white with the sides of the head and ears being either black, badger, any shade of gray, sand, or red.

  • Colored body patches are allowed and are usually present.

  • A snow-white coat, as found in the Great Pyrenees, is uncommon.

  • Moderate grooming required.

Health and Wellness:
  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Elbow dysplasia.

  • Autoimmune thyroid disease.

  • Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD).

  • Gastric dilatation and volvulus syndrome (GDV, also commonly called bloat).

  • Metabolic bone disease.

  • Muzzle pyoderma.

  • Arthritis.

What you should know:
  • Obedience training is recommended.

  • Do not confuse this dog with the Great Pyrenees, which is similar in appearance.

  • Not suitable for apartments.

  • Very difficult to find a puppy in the United States.

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Pointer

Other names/Nicknames:
  • English Pointer

  • Spanish Pointer

Country/Date of origin:
  • ...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • English Pointer

  • Spanish Pointer

Country/Date of origin:
  • Great Britain

  • 1600′s

Height:
  • Females:  23 to 26 inches

  • Males:  25 to 28 inches

Weight:
  • Females:  44 to 65 pounds

  • Males:  55 to 75 pounds

Personality:
  • A dog that loves to hunt birds.

  • Adaptable to people and situations.

  • Good watchdogs.

  • Does not need excessive exercise, but lack of exercise may lead to hyperactivity or destructiveness.

  • Fun-loving and mischievous.

History:

By crossing stocky Spanish Pointers with the more agile Italian Pointers (similar to the French Braque), British breeders were able to perfect the best bird dog ever created.  It is the most popular pointing dog in the world.  It has an incredible nose and the speed and endurance to cover large areas of ground.  The Pointer is especially suited to the hunting conditions of the United States where it is hunted from horseback.  Records of the Pointer have been kept since about 1650, although paintings of Pointer-type dogs were even found in Egyptian tombs 3000 years ago.  It is the fountainhead of many of the other field dog breeds.  Pointers were one of the foundation breeds of the American Kennel Club (AKC).

Body Type:
  • Has an agile and athletic build.

  • The medium length tail is carried level with the back.  It is never altered.

  • The hanging ears are of medium length and lie close to the head.  They are not altered.

  • dish face is typical of the Pointer.

Coat:
  • The short, dense coat has a glossy sheen.

  • Permissible colors are liver, lemon, black, and orange either in combination with white or solid-colored.

  • Solid-color pointers are rarely seen.

  • Minimal grooming required.

Health and Wellness:
  • Congenital deafness.

  • Metabolic bone disease.

  • Follicular dysplasia.

  • Demodicosis.

What you should know:
  • A roaming rover.  The Pointer likes to go where its nose leads.

  • The most popular pointing dog in the world.

  • The scenting abilities, speed, endurance and single-mindedness are unsurpassed.

  • The Pointer’s birdiness is very strong but it still makes an excellent house pet.

  • A strong-willed nature makes obedience training a must.

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Poodle (Standard)

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Caniche

  • French Poodle

Country/Date of origin:
  • Germany

  • ...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Caniche

  • French Poodle

Country/Date of origin:
  • Germany

  • 1400′s

Height:
  • Over 15 inches (average is 25 inches)

Weight:
  • 50 to 55 pounds

Personality:
  • Candidate for most intelligent breed of dog.

  • Extremely willing to please.

  • Happy, lively, and playful.

  • Easily trained.

  • Friendly and outgoing.

  • Poodles love everybody, although the Standard size is less accepting of strangers.

  • An excellent family dog for those who are prepared to maintain the coat.

History:

The Poodle originated in Germany as a water retriever (Pudel means water in German).  Today there are three sizes:  toy, miniature and standard.  They are all judged by the same standard of perfection and are identical in every respect except height.   The standard, or largest size, is thought to be the original Poodle.  Although the American Kennel Club (AKC) classifies it as a non-sporting breed, it still retains its hunting abilities and remains an exceptional swimmer.  The Standard is often seen in circuses and obedience rings.

Body Type:
  • A squarely-built, active dog that carries itself with dignity.

  • Hanging ears are not altered.

  • Upright tail is carried at an angle to the body and is docked.

Coat:
  • The long coat of the poodle is double.  The outercoat is wiry curls.  The undercoat is thick and woolly.

  • If unhindered, the outercoat forms thin cylindrical mats known as cords.  Corded Poodles are rarely seen in the United States because they are difficult to keep clean.

  • Any solid color is permitted.  The most common colors are black and white.  Apricot, brown, blue, and silver are possible.

  • The skin color of Poodles varies.  Skin may be pink, blue, silver, or cream.

  • Requires professional grooming every five or six weeks.

  • Two clips are allowed in the United States show ring:  the Continental and the English Saddle.  Puppies are exempted from this and can be shown in a puppy clip (their hair isn’t long enough to accommodate the adult clips) until they are one-year old.

  • The face, feet, and base of tail are shaved in all the clips.

  • A full coat may take two years to develop.

Health and Wellness:
  • Subject to less genetic problems than the smaller sizes, probably because it has never been overbred.

  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Autoimmune thyroid disease.

  • Gastric dilatation and volvulus syndrome (GDV, also commonly called bloat)

  • Patent ductus arteriosis.

  • Tetralogy of Fallot.

  • von Willebrand’s disease.

  • Portosystemic shunt.

  • Metabolic bone disease.

  • Cataracts.

  • Diabetes mellitus.

  • Addison’s disease.

  • Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA).

  • Immune mediated thrombocytopenia (IMT).

  • Idiopathic epilepsy.

  • Sebaceous adenitis.

  • Urolithiasis (oxalate and struvite).

  • Chronic hepatitis.

  • Cushing’s syndrome (PDH and AT).

  • Intervertebral disc disease (IVDD).

  • Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (digit, black Standard).

  • Sebaceous adenomas.

What you shouldl know:
  • In spite of the name, the French Poodle is not Gallic. It is a breed Made in Germany.

  • The pompoms and topknots of the Poodle, which seem so frivolous, had a utilitarian origin. Water retrievers, the Poodles needed the chest and head hair to protect vital organs from the cold. The pompoms, you will notice, are placed on the joints to protect them from becoming arthritic.

  • Victorian merchants often had advertisements cut into the coat of a Poodle and hired someone to walk around with the dog. Sort of a living billboard. Grooming contests attract international teams which clip Poodles into artistic creations. Prizes are in the thousands of dollars.

  • Poodles are beautiful and they know it. You might even describe them as vain.

  • Love to be pampered and it is easy to spoil these adorable clowns.

  • Does not shed.

  • Suggested for allergy sufferers.

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Pug

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Carlin

  • Mops

Country/Date of origin:
  • China

  • 1500′s

...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Carlin

  • Mops

Country/Date of origin:
  • China

  • 1500′s

Height:
  • 10 to 11 inches

Weight:
  • 14 to 18 pounds

Personality:
  • An imp.

  • Loyal and affectionate.

  • Friendly to strangers.

  • Intelligent.

  • Stubbornness makes this breed hard to train.

  • Extremely playful.

  • Always ready for a game.

History:

Thought to have originated in China.  The Pug was popular in China, Tibet, and Japan for almost fifteen-hundred years before Europeans discovered it.  The Pug arrived in Europe via Holland in the fifteen-hundreds.  It became the mascot of the Dutch ruling House of Orange when one of these dogs supposedly saved the life of a prince by warning him of Spanish invaders during a battle.  When William of Orange became King of England, he brought Pugs with him.  The breed reached the height of its popularity during his reign.  The pug has been recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) since 1885 and has had ups-and-downs in popularity.  At the present, it is ranked twenty-sixth in popularity.

Body Type:
  • Largest toy breed, the Pug is a stocky dog with a massive head, embellished with deep wrinkles.

  • Button or rose ears are not altered.

  • Tail is tightly curled and carried over hip.  It is not altered.

Coat:
  • The short coat is soft and fine.

  • Allowed colors are: solid black, apricot, silver-fawn, or fawn.

  • Fawn coloration must include a black line, called a trace, down the center of the back from the head to the tail.

  • Minimal grooming.

  • Sheds heavily for a short haired dog.

  • Facial wrinkles must be cleaned daily to prevent fungal infections.

Health and Wellness:
  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Brachycephalic airway obstruction syndrome.

  • Legg-Perthes disease.

  • Cleft lip and palate.

  • Mast cell tumor.

  • Pug encephalitis.

  • Luxating patellas.

  • Pigmentary keratitis.

  • Atopy.

  • Skin fold pyoderma (facial and tail).

What you should know:
  • Very long-lived dog.

  • Snores up a storm.

  • Not suggested for homes with cats as the eyes of a Pug are easily damaged.

  • Empress Josephine’s pet Pug, Fortune, carried secret messages under his collar to her husband Napoleon when he was imprisoned at Les Carmes.

  • Darlings of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, Pugs became a fashion statement in the 20th century.

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Pumi

Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Hungary

  • 1800′s

Height:
  • 13 ...

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Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Hungary

  • 1800′s

Height:
  • 13 to 19 inches

Weight:
  • 18 to 29 pounds

Personality:
  • Super intelligent, self-assertive.

  • Pumis are intensely curious.  Nothing escapes their attention.

  • The Terrier’s passion for rat hunting lives in the Pumi.

  • It is not possible to exhaust a Pumi.  They bubble with energy.

  • Pumis have a real sense of humor, which is probably a valuable asset for a pig herder.

History:

The Pumi began to emerge as a separate breed from lines of the more ancient Hungarian Puli in the late 19th century.  The Puli is a long-haired sheep dog while the Pumi is a herding terrier with a medium-long coat.  The Terrier characteristics are an essential part of the Pumi—both physically and temperamentally.  In 1920 they appeared as a regional variety at a Hungarian show, and in 1923, appeared as a separate breed.  It has never, however, attained the popularity of its parent breed.  The Pumi is a versatile herder, taking responsibility for sheep, geese, and pigs in its homeland.

Body Type:
  • Ears are pricked and curl over at the tips.  They are not altered.

  • Tail is set high, forming a loose curl over the back or carried horizontally.  In Hungary, the tail is usually cropped to two-thirds of its original length to give the dog a more Terrier-like appearance.

Coat:
  • The coat is medium in length and curly, not long and corded like the other Sheepdogs of Hungary.

  • Any color is acceptable as long as it is a solid color.

  • Parti-coloring is not permitted.

  • Gray is the most common color but a rusty-brown and a pale, sandy-yellow are frequently seen.

  • Pure white and pure black are quite rare.

  • The Pumi coat does not mat.

Health and Wellness:
  • A robust and hardy dog that can be kept indoors or out.

What you should know:
  • Very noisy.  Pumi is described as a four-footed burglar alarm.  Their method is not intervention, but prevention.  They nip any attempts at intrusion in the bud.

  • The Pumi listens to everything its master says, often acknowledging the instructions with a little bark.  To anyone watching, it appears that they are having a conversation.

  • Puppies are born black and begin to get their gray coat color around the lips and eyes first, which makes them look like little old men.

  • This breed has never been popular in the United States and puppies will be very difficult to find.

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Ragdoll

Personality:
  • Quiet, placid, and relaxed.

  • Affectionate and loving.

  • Slow to mature,...

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Personality:
  • Quiet, placid, and relaxed.

  • Affectionate and loving.

  • Slow to mature, the Ragdoll can take up to four years to reach full size.

History:

One of the largest breeds of cat, the Ragdoll was developed in California during the 1960′s by Ann Baker who used Persians, Birmans and Burmese-type cats.  No pedigreed cats were used to create the breed.  The combination resulted in kittens with the colorpoint gene as well as a white spotting factor.  Named for the characteristic of going limp like a ragdoll when held.  Although accepted as a breed by most cat associations, the Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA) does not recognize the Ragdoll for championship status.

Body Type:
  • Large, well-balanced and muscular.

  • Head is a modified wedge with medium-sized ears.

  • Blue eyes are wide set, large and oval.

  • Characteristic fatty pad on lower abdomen is called the Greater Omentum.

Coat:
  • Medium-long, plush coat is longest around the neck and outer edges of the face.

  • Basically a pointed cat, the Ragdoll has a lighter base coat with complementing darker colored points (blue, seal, chocolate and lilac) on ears, face, legs, and tail.

  • Long coat does not mat.

  • Three coat patterns include:  bicolor (pointed but with various markings of white and colored patches), mitted (pointed but with evenly matched white feet), and colorpoint (paler body color with points—no white markings).

Health and Wellness:
  • No particular concerns.

What you should know:
  • Having been bred to have a docile nature, Ragdolls are strictly indoor cats.

  • They do not have street cat survival instincts and their beauty and sweetness provide an irresistible temptation for catnappers.

  • The Ragdoll should not be confused with an experimental breed known as RagaMuffin, which was founded by using Ragdoll stock.

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Texas West Animal Health

16367 South FM 4,

Santo, TX 76472

Phone. 940-769-2222

Fax. 866-632-3365

Email. texaswestvet@gmail.com