BREED INFORMATION

Siberian Husky

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Arctic Husky

Country/Date of origin:
  • Russia

  • 1800′s

...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Arctic Husky

Country/Date of origin:
  • Russia

  • 1800′s

Height:
  • Females: 20 to 22 inches

  • Males:  21 to 23-1/2 inches

Weight:
  • Females:  35 to 50 pounds

  • Males:  45 to 60 pounds

Personality:
  • Intelligent and eager to please.  This is not the typical sled dog personality.

  • Siberians are softer and more responsive.

  • Friendly by nature towards humans but really stubborn.

  • Prefers to be outdoors.

  • High energy.

History:

This is the speed demon of the sled dog world.  This working animal of the Chukchi people of northeast Siberia caused a sensation when it was introduced to Alaska for the All Alaska Sweepstakes in 1909.  They revolutionized racing, as nothing finished even close to them.  Today, the racing sled dogs of Alaska owe much to their Siberian Husky blood.  Recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1903.  Very popular as a companion animal.

Body Type:
  • A medium-sized, sled dog of the Spitz family.

  • Compact and muscular with a wolf-like expression.

  • The tail, bushy and fox like, is carried over the back.  It is never altered.

  • The ears are erect and are not altered.  In line with what you would expect from a Northern dog, the ears are small and heavily furred.

  • Eyes may be brown or blue, or the dog may have one of each color.

Coat:
  • Thick, double coat of short to medium length.

  • The outercoat is coarse and the undercoat is oily and woolly.

  • All colors are permitted from black to white, with many having striking face markings.

  • Sheds heavily in the spring.  At other times, grooming is moderate.

Health and Wellness:
  • Autoimmune thyroid disease.

  • Laryngeal paralysis.

  • Ectopic ureter.

  • Follicular dysplasia.

  • Congenital deafness.

  • Metabolic bone disease.

  • Cataracts.

  • Glaucoma.

  • Uveodermatologic syndrome.

  • Zinc-responsive dermatosis.

  • Discoid lupus erythematosis.

  • Progressive retinal atrophy.

  • Skin tumors.

What you should know:
  • Communal howling is a hallmark of the breed.

  • Much gentler and much less quarrelsome with other dogs than the other Northern breeds.

  • Registered under the name Arctic Husky by the United Kennel Club (UKC).

  • Very popular.  In the top twenty of AKC registrations for 1995.

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Singapura

Personality:
  • Curious, friendly, and extremely affectionate.

  • Playful and maternal in...

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Personality:
  • Curious, friendly, and extremely affectionate.

  • Playful and maternal in nature.

History:

Originated from the natural cat gene pool of Southeast Asia.  In 1975, three cats found on the streets of Singapore were imported to the United States and became the foundation for the breed.  Another cat was obtained from the Singapore SPCA in 1980 for use in the breeding program.  Accepted by the Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA) for championship in 1988.

Body Type:
  • Small, muscular, and moderately stocky.

  • Rounded head with large eyes and ears.

  • Feet are small for the size of the cat.

  • Eyes color is hazel, green, or yellow with no other color permitted.

Coat:
  • Coat is very short, silky, and close lying.

  • Warm, ivory-ground color with warm, dark-brown ticking.

  • Each hair should have at least two bands of dark ticking separated by light bands.

  • Some barring on the inner front legs and back knees.

Health and Wellness:
  • Because of the limited gene pool, occasionally kittens may have zyphoid sternums (protruding sternum bone) and/or juvenile heart murmurs.

  • Although cats with these defects may be fine as pets, they should not be used in a breeding program.

  • Kinked tails and white lockets are also seen from time to time.  These minor aesthetic defects do not affect the well being of the cat, but are grounds for disqualification in the show ring.

What you should know:
  • Listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the smallest breed of domestic cat.

  • Considered to be a rare breed.  Some kittens may be shy with strangers.

  • Spend time with kittens before selecting your pet to insure that your kitten will have a sociable nature.

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Snowshoe

Personality:
  • Intelligent, playful, and athletic.

  • Affectionate and tactile.

  • Happiest ...

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Personality:
  • Intelligent, playful, and athletic.

  • Affectionate and tactile.

  • Happiest when they can share their household with a companion animal.

History:

Until breeders worked to remove it, at the turn of the century many Siamese had white markings.  The Snowshoe is a return to a Siamese of Victorian times, with a heavier body, rounder head, and striking white markings.  To create the breed, cat fanciers crossed traditional Applehead-style Siamese with blue or black bicolored American Shorthairs.  Accepted for championship in The International Cat Association (TICA) in 1994.  Not accepted by the Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA).

Body Type:
  • Medium-sized, well-balanced, long and firm without being extreme.

  • Head is a broad, modified wedge with medium, slightly-rounded tip ears.

  • Brilliant blue eyes have an oval shape.

Coat:
  • Coat is short to medium short, smooth, and close lying.

  • Basically a pointed cat, with a paler base coat and either blue or seal colored points on face, ears, legs, and tail.

  • White markings can be found in various degrees on the face, chin, chest, stomach, and feet.

  • Only Snowshoes with extensive white mustaches, a prominent white blaze, or a white V-mark on the face, can be shown.

  • Piebald patterned cats—cats having white on 50%  of their body or with white on the back and hips—are sold with alter agreements only.

Health and Wellness:
  • Because this breed is a hybrid with traditional Siamese in their background, some cats will have kinked tails and/or crossed eyes.  These defects do not affect the well being of the cat but are grounds for disqualification in the show ring.

What you should know:
  • Since Snowshoes are still a relatively new breed, there are still a lot of different ideas about what they should look like.

  • Do research before purchasing your Snowshoe and discuss variations with breeders.

  • Because the breed was founded by using traditional style Siamese, some Snowshoes may have kinked tails or crossed eyes.

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Somali

Personality:
  • Active, enthusiastic companions.

  • Intelligent and enterprising.

  • Some...

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Personality:
  • Active, enthusiastic companions.

  • Intelligent and enterprising.

  • Some have an uncanny ability to use their paws like hands.

  • Very adept at entertaining themselves.

  • More tranquil than their Abyssinian relatives.

History:

At one time these cats were considered the undesirable result of a recessive gene that caused some Abyssinians to be born with long hair.  A few Abyssinian breeders liked the look and began a breeding program to develop the longhaired Abyssinians as a separate breed.  The breed’s name was chosen because of the close proximity of Somali to Abyssinia.  Accepted for championship status in the Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA) in 1978.

Body Type:
  • Medium to large with a lithe, graceful body, well-developed muscles, and a full-brush tail.

  • Fox-like appearance.

  • Head is a modified, rounded wedge with large, alert, tufted ears.

  • Eyes are almond shaped, large, and expressive.

Coat:
  • Fine, non-matting, medium-long, double coat with ruff and britches.

  • Colors include blue (soft-gray ticked with slate blue.  Undercoat should be a warm blush-beige or oatmeal), ruddy (reddish-brown ticked with black), red (warm, red ticked with chocolate brown) and fawn (cream ticked with pinkish brown).

  • Each hair has two to three alternating bands of darker and lighter coloring known as ticking.

Health and Wellness:
  • Gingivitis may occur in some lines.  Preventive dental care and early treatment can keep this condition under control.

What you should know:
  • Although many people believe that a Somali needs lots of space and should be kept outdoors, they are perfectly adapted to apartment life and are much happier, safer and healthier when they are kept indoors.

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Spanish Mastiff

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Mastin Espanol

  • La Mancha

Country/Date of origin:
  • Spain

  • 800′s

...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Mastin Espanol

  • La Mancha

Country/Date of origin:
  • Spain

  • 800′s

Height:
  • 26 to 29 inches

Weight:
  • 110 to 135 pounds

Personality:
  • Forms attachment to a single person.

  • Very protective.

  • Usually nonaggressive toward strangers.

  • May not get along well with other dogs.

History:

A descendant of the ancient Molossus dogs, this Mastiff was probably introduced to Spain by Phoenician traders.  It was developed into its present form in the vicinity of Madrid, where its primary use for many centuries was as a guard dog of both livestock and homes.  Although it is centuries old, a breed standard was not drawn up until 1946.  Commonly seen at Spanish dog shows, the Spanish Mastiff is rarely seen outside of its home country.

Body Type:
  • Typical mastiff appearance, although the head is not as massive as some breeds in the group.

  • The long tail often has a curved tip.  It is carried low and never altered.

  • The small, hanging ears are not altered.

  • Skin is loose and there is a pronounced dewlap.

Coat:
  • Medium-length, thick, and soft with an almost woolly texture.

  • Allowed colors are any shade of fawn and red, wolf gray, grizzle with cream markings, and brindle.

  • Moderate grooming required.

Health and Wellness:
  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Elbow dysplasia.

  • Autoimmune thyroid disease.

  • Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD).

  • Gastric dilatation and volvulus syndrome (GDV, also commonly called bloat).

  • Metabolic bone disease.

  • Muzzle pyoderma.

  • Arthritis.

What you should know:
  • Obedience training is highly recommended.

  • May be difficult to find in the United States

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Silky Terrier

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Sidney Silky

  • Australian Silky Terrier

Country/Date of origin:
  • ...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Sidney Silky

  • Australian Silky Terrier

Country/Date of origin:
  • Australia

  • 19th century

Height:
  • 9 to 10 inches

Weight:
  • 8 to 11 pounds

Personality:
  • A bundle of energy with a true terrier spirit.

  • One-family dog.

  • Does not like strangers.

  • Noisy.

  • Makes a good watchdog.

  • Possessive of its people and territory.

  • Likes to get its own way—and usually does because it is so insistent.

  • Difficult to train.

History:

This feisty little terrier was created in Sidney, Australia by crossing Australian Terriers with Yorkshire Terriers.  It got its diminutive size from the Yorkie and its ruggedness and spirit from the Aussie Terrier.  It was first shown in 1907 as the Sidney Silky.  The first representatives of the breed were imported to the United States in the 1950′s and it was accepted for registration by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1959.

Body Type:
  • A small, terrier-type dog with a long, lightly-built body.

  • Tail is docked and carried erect or semi erect.

  • Small, prick ears are held erect and not altered.

Coat:
  • The fine, silky, single coat (that gives the dog its name) is long on the body and head and short on the face, ears, and lower legs.

  • Silky Terriers must be a blue and tan color.  The blue varies from gunmetal to slate or silver-blue.

  • Coat is parted on the head and down over the back to the root of the tail.

  • Not much shedding but the coat mats easily.

Health and Wellness:
  • Legg-Perthes disease.

  • Tracheal collapse.

  • Patella luxation.

  • Diabetes mellitus.

  • Atlanto-axial sublucation.

  • Periodontal disease.

  • Color dilution alopecia.

  • Mitral insufficiency.

What you should know:
  • Wants to be boss.

  • Very quick moving.

  • Makes an excellent snake killer in its native Australia.

  • This is a small terrier, not a Toy dog, in spite of the way the American Kennel Club classifies it.

  • Sturdy, robust, and fiery in nature, there is nothing delicate about this dog.  It is a lot of dog in a little package.

  • The relative rarity of the Silky Terrier makes puppies hard to find.

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Skye Terrier

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Terrier of the Western Isles
Country/Date of origin:
  • Scotland
  • 1600′s
...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Terrier of the Western Isles
Country/Date of origin:
  • Scotland
  • 1600′s
Height:
  • 9 to 10 inches
Weight:
  • 19 to 23 pounds
Personality:
  • Friendly and loyal to those he knows but reserved and cautious with strangers.

  • The Skye has an aloof personality, even within its family circle.

  • Not recommended for homes with other pets.

  • May be overprotective with property.

History:

Relatively unchanged for four hundred years, the Skye Terrier is a product of the harsh and demanding Outer Hebrides Islands off the northern coast of Scotland.  The long coat offered the dog protection from the weather and the dangerous animals such as the badger, fox, and weasel that he hunted.  Rarely seen now, the Skye was the most popular terrier in the world until the end of the 19th century.  Skyes were one of the foundation breeds of the American Kennel Club (AKC).

Body Type:
  • Long, lean, and lanky, this short-legged terrier has a body that is twice as long as it is high.

  • Ears, which can be either drop or prick, are not altered.  Prick ears are much more common than drop ears.

  • The long tail, which is carried in a downward curve, is not altered.

Coat:
  • Double weather-resistant coat.

  • Outer hairs are long, wiry, and lay flat.  The undercoat is short, dense, soft, and woolly.

  • Any solid color is allowed, and a dark muzzle and dark ears are prized.

  • The most common colors are varying shades of gray and cream.

  • Hair on the head is shorter and softer than elsewhere, and forms a veil over the forehead and eyes.

  • Body hair is parted along the midline of the back and must be at least five and a half inches long.

  • It may take three years for a young Skye to develop the proper length coat.

  • Requires professional grooming.

Health and Wellness:
  • Overall a healthy breed.

  • Autoimmune thyroid disease.

  • Copper hepatopathy.

  • Some hypoplasia of the larynx.

  • Occasional colitis and bowel irritations reported.

What you should know:
  • Low exercise requirements make the Skye an ideal city or apartment pet.

  • Part of the breed’s popularity is due to the affection Queen Victoria lavished on her Skye, Boz.

  • Skyes often bring a smile to observers because their long body and apron of hair concealing their feet gives them the appearance of caterpillars.

  • The motto of the Skye Terrier Club is “Wha daur meddle wi’ me” or “Don’t mess with me”.

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Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier

Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Ireland

  • 1700′s

Height:
  • Females:  17 to...

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Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Ireland

  • 1700′s

Height:
  • Females:  17 to 18 inches

  • Males:  18 t 19 inches

Weight:
  • Females:  30 to 35 pounds

  • Males:  35 to 40 pounds

Personality:
  • Sweet-natured and affectionate.

  • Gets along well with other pets.

  • Wants to please and is, consequently, easy to train.

History:

An all-purpose, farm dog bred in the south of Ireland, the Soft Coated Wheaten was kept down-on-the-farm for centuries.  Its prowess was a well kept secret. Wheatens can herd cattle and sheep, retrieve game, guard home and garden, and single-handily eliminate vermin on a property.  It has been recognized as a pure bred dog in Ireland since 1937, but didn’t gain acceptance to the American Kennel Club (AKC) until 1973.

Body Type:
  • Very similar in appearance to the Kerry Blue Terrier, which comes from the southern part of Ireland as well.

  • Wheatens are somewhat shorter and lighter than the Kerry.

  • Button ears are not altered.

  • Tail is docked short.

Coat:
  • Wheaten-colored coat is the hallmark of the breed.

  • The soft hair is slightly wavy.  Without frequent combing it will mat.

  • Coat does not shed.

Health and Wellness:
  • Generally healthy.

  • Protein-losing enteropathy.

  • Protein-losing nephropathy.

  • Mitral insufficiency.

What you should know:
  • There are no hyphens in the breed name—they were eliminated by a vote of the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier Club.

  • Not prone to the dogfighting that other terriers seem to revel in.

  • Puppies have a red cast to the coat with black face markings.  They will fade to the adult coloration by the time they reach their second birthday.

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South Russian Owtcharka

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Iuzjnorusskaja Owtcharka
  • South Russian Sheepdog
Country/Date of...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Iuzjnorusskaja Owtcharka
  • South Russian Sheepdog
Country/Date of origin:
  • Russia
  • 1700′s
Height:
  • From 26 inches
Weight:
  • 110 to 140 pounds
Personality:
  • Fierce, strong, guard dog.
  • Very intelligent.
  • Suspicious and aggressive toward strangers.
History:

This is a large, aggressive, livestock-guarding dog that originated in the Crimean and Ukrainian regions of Russia.  These dogs were relied upon to protect the flocks from wolves and robbers and were left on their own to perform this function.  In more recent times they have been used to keep prisoners from leaving gulags and have proven to be excellent military guard dogs.

Body Type:
  • Resembles an oversized Briard.
  • The long tail is carried low with a slight kink at the tip (as found in the Briard).  It is not altered.
  • The ears are often cropped, and the abundant hair gives the same appearance as the Briard.  If not cropped, the ears hang close to the head.
Coat:
  • A thick, double coat that is water resistant.
  • Coat is abundant and about six-inches long.
  • White is the most common color.  Cream, pale lemon, or gray is also allowed.
  • Requires extensive grooming, especially when shedding.
Health and Wellness:
  • Subject to hip dysplasia.
  • Generally robust.
  • Not suited to hot climates.
What you should know:
  • Owtcharka means sheepdog in Russian.
  • Pronounce it of-charka as the Russians do.  Plural is Owtcharki.
  • Will be difficult to obtain.
  • Obedience training is recommended.
  • Needs plenty of room.
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Sphynx

Personality:
  • Intelligent, loyal, and loving.

  • Sociable, but usually select one particular human as their own.

History:

Breed is the result of a spontaneous mutation of the gene related to hair.  ...

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Personality:
  • Intelligent, loyal, and loving.

  • Sociable, but usually select one particular human as their own.

History:

Breed is the result of a spontaneous mutation of the gene related to hair.  The name for the cat was inspired from ancient Greek drawings of a mythical creature that resembles the cat.  First imports to the United States came from France and Canada and are believed to have originated from a Devon or Cornish Rex background.  Accepted for championship status by The International Cat Association (TICA) in 1987.  Not accepted by the Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA).

Body Type:
  • Medium-sized cat with a broad chest, medium to fine boning and whip-like tail.

  • Roll of fat around midriff helps to maintain body heat.

  • Head is shaped like a modified wedge with very large ears.

  • Eyes are large, wide set and correspond to coat color.

Coat:
  • Coat consists of fuzz-like hair with perceptible hair on the feet, tip of the tail, nose, and behind the ears.

  • Cat feels like warm velvet or suede.

  • Since there is no protective hair in the ears, they must be cleaned every other day with a cotton swab.

  • Wide assortment of colors including solids, tabby patterns, or parti-colors.

Health and Wellness:
  • In the past, this breed was reported to have had problems with immune system development.  According to Sphynx breeders, this problem no longer exists.

What you should know:
  • Cat must be kept out of the sun to avoid sunburn.

  • Requires a high-calorie diet in order to maintain body heat.

  • Sphyxes must be protected from extremes in temperature.

  • Since there is no coat to absorb natural oils and no hair in the ears to repel dirt, a Sphynx will require more grooming than its furry cousins.

  • Please be sure that you have the dedication and time available to maintain a Sphynx before purchasing a kitten.

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Staffordshire Bull Terrier

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Bull and Terrier

  • Pit Bull

Country/Date of origin:
  • England

    ...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Bull and Terrier

  • Pit Bull

Country/Date of origin:
  • England

  • 1800′s

Height:
  • 14 to 16 inches

Weight:
  • Females:  24 to 34 pounds

  • Males:  28 to 38 pounds

Personality:
  • Quarrelsome with other dogs but surprisingly gentle towards his humans.

  • Must be supervised around other animals and strangers.

  • Loyal and devoted.

  • A courageous and determined watchdog that fears no human or animal.

History:

A 19th-century variety of a much older form of bull and terrier cross that was bred for the sport of dog fighting.  After bullbaiting was abolished in England, a smaller, faster dog was created by crossing the Bulldog with more agile terriers.  The outlawing of dog fighting did not wipe out the breed, it merely went underground.  Sad to say, illegal dog fighting continues to this day.  The ruffian street fighter was not granted the respectability of Kennel Club registration in England until 1935, and it took decades for the American Kennel Club (AKC) to acknowledge it.  In 1975, the first Staffordshire Bull Terrier competed in a dog show here.  Today, the fire and fight remain but the show-dog’s temperament has been refined so that it now makes a fine family pet.

Body Type:
  • A medium-sized, heavy-set dog that gives the appearance of power and strength combined with athletic ability.

  • Often confused with the larger American Staffordshire Terrier which has cropped ears.

  • Rose or half pricked ears are not altered.

  • The medium-length tail is not altered and is carried downward.

Coat:
  • Smooth and close to the skin.

  • Numerous colors and combination of colors allowed: red, fawn, white, black, blue or any of these colors in combination with white, or brindle with or without white.

  • Black and tan and liver are not allowable colors in the show ring.

  • Easily groomed at home.

Health and Wellness:
  • Generally very healthy.

  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Cataracts.

  • Follicular dysplasia.

  • Hemangiomas (actinic).

  • Hemangiosarcomas.

  • Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, actinic).

What you should know:
  • It is illegal to own this breed in many places and many insurance companies will not cover owners of these dogs.

  • Puppies must be separated from each other at an early age to prevent fights.

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Sussex Spaniel

Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Great Britain

  • 1700′s

...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Great Britain

  • 1700′s

Height:
  • 13 to 16 inches

Weight:
  • 35 to 45 pounds

Personality:
  • Gentle and cheerful.

  • Not as intelligent as some of the spaniels but willing to please and can be trained.

  • Noisy.

  • Can be unpredictable with other dogs.

  • Slow moving due to its bulk and short legs.

History:

A member of the British Spaniel family, the Sussex is the breed that stands lowest to the ground.  It is heavyset and slow, bred during a time when men still hunted on foot.  Its name comes from the county of England where it was developed.  Said to have a good nose, the Sussex may become more popular as game preserves and foot hunting become the hunting mode of necessity.

Body Type:
  • A spaniel but massive, long, low and muscular.

  • The low-set tail is always docked to between five and seven inches.

  • The hanging ears are fairly large and lie close to the head.  They are never altered.

  • Heavily wrinkled face gives the breed a scowling look.

Coat:
  • Abundant, flat, slightly waxy.

  • Moderate in length, except for long feathering on ears, legs, tail, and chest.

  • The only allowed color is rich golden liver.

  • Moderate grooming required.

Health and Wellness:
  • Very healthy.

  • Ears should be checked routinely.

  • Hip dysplasia.

What you should know:
  • The only spaniel that gives tongue on the trail.

  • It has a clear, bell-like voice and talks to the gunners repeatedly as it hunts.

  • A very rare breed in England and in America.  A puppy will be difficult to find in either country.

  • Puppies are unusually fragile.  The mortality rate, especially in females, is high.

  • Called a self-colored dog, the Sussex has a coat, eyes, and nose that match.

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Tibetan Mastiff

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Do-Khyi

Country/Date of origin:
  • Tibet

  • 900′s

Height:
  • 24 ...

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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Do-Khyi

Country/Date of origin:
  • Tibet

  • 900′s

Height:
  • 24 to 28 inches

Weight:
  • 140 to 180 pounds

Personality:
  • Responsive to training.

  • Usually gentle.

  • Loyal to its family.

  • Excellent guard dog.

History:

The Tibetan Mastiff is believed to be the originator of most of the European Mastiff breeds.  It has remained unchanged for centuries.  A fierce guard dog, it was used by nomadic Tibetan people.  Marco Polo reported seeing this dog during his travels but it remained relatively unknown outside of Tibet until the 1970′s.  At that time they were imported to the United States, Germany and Switzerland.

Body Type:
  • Typical Mastiff-type dog but not as heavy in body.

  • The tail is carried over the back in a loose curl and is not altered.

  • The hanging ears are carried close to the head and are not altered.

Coat:
  • Medium-long with a very thick undercoat.

  • Has a mane around the neck.

  • Accepted colors are black, brown, and bluish gray, with or without tan markings.

  • Grooming is moderate but brushing is a must.

Health and Wellness:
  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Elbow dysplasia.

  • Autoimmune thyroid disease.

  • Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD).

  • Gastric dilatation and volvulus syndrome (GDV, also commonly called bloat).

  • Metabolic bone disease.

  • Muzzle pyoderma.

  • Arthritis.

What you should know:
  • Obedience training recommended.

  • Puppies are difficult to find, especially since the females do not come into season as often as other breeds.

  • It is common in Tibet for this dog to wear a red yak’s-hair collar as a status symbol.

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Tonkinese

Personality:
  • Extremely intelligent, affectionate, and people-oriented.

  • Very sociable...

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Personality:
  • Extremely intelligent, affectionate, and people-oriented.

  • Very sociable and eager to participate in household activities.

  • Known to enjoy riding on shoulders.

History:

Hybrid that is the result of crossings in the 1950′s between Burmese and Siamese in an effort to create a cat midway between the darker colors of the Burmese and the lighter colors of the Siamese.  As Burmese and Siamese breeds became more diverse and extreme in type, the Tonkinese provided a more intermediate look, neither cobby nor svelte.  Accepted for championship status in the Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA) in 1984.

Body Type:
  • Medium-size, intermediate in type, balanced, muscular and surprisingly heavy.

  • Head is a modified wedge shape with medium, wide-set ears.

  • Distinctive aqua colored eyes are a medium almond shape.

Coat:
  • Coat is medium short, fine, soft, and glossy.

  • Coat texture resembles mink.

  • Can take 18 months before color fully develops.

  • Eye color can change as the cat matures.

  • CFA recognizes mink colors for championship competition including:  natural mink (medium-brown body graduating to dark brown points), champagne mink (golden-buff body graduating to medium-brown points), blue mink (soft blue-gray body graduating to slate-blue points), and platinum mink (pale-silver body graduating to frosty-gray points).

  • The International Cat Association (TICA) recognizes the mink colors, as well as those same colors in solid and pointed versions.

Health and Wellness:
  • Kittens may be slow to develop a strong immune system, making them susceptible to colds and upper respiratory infections.  As the cat matures, the problem subsides.

What you should know:
  • Happiest when in homes with a companion cat.

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Toy Poodle

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Toy Black and Tan Terrier (no longer used)

Country/Date of...
read more
Other names/Nicknames:
  • Toy Black and Tan Terrier (no longer used)

Country/Date of origin:
  • England

  • 1500′s

Height:
  • 10 to 12 inches

Weight:
  • Under 12 pounds

Personality:
  • One-family dog that is reserved with strangers.

  • Alert and quick to bark an alarm.

  • Is less aggressive than the Standard variety.

History:

There are two sizes of the Manchester Terrier, the Toy and the Standard.  Both spring from the same stock, one of the oldest strains of British terrier.  In the Manchester district of England, the breed was developed for poor-man’s sports—rat killing and rabbit coursing.  Judicious crossings of the now extinct Black and Tan Terrier and Whippets gave the Manchester what was wanted in a rat and rabbit dog—the fire and courage of the Terrier and the speed of the little Greyhounds. In 1923, the American Kennel Club (AKC) adopted the name of Manchester Terrier.  Until 1959, the Toy and the Standard were registered as two separate breeds, although interbreeding between the two breeds was permitted.  Since that date, they have been registered as a single breed with two varieties.  A single litter may have both varieties:  those under 12 pounds being shown as Toys, and those over 12 pounds shown as Standards.

Body Type:
  • Everything about this small terrier is sleek, from the long, unbroken line of the face to the tapering tail.

  • Classes at shows are often divided into two groups: seven pounds and under, and over seven pounds but not exceeding 12 pounds.

  • The erect ears of the Toy variety of the Manchester must not be altered.  Standard Manchesters can have button ears, drop ears, or cropped, erect ears.

  • Long whiplike tail is unaltered.

Coat:
  • Sleek, short, coat lies close to the body and is very glossy.

  • Only color allowed is jet black with mahogany tan markings on the legs and head.

  • A small tan spot on the side of each cheek and over each eye is required.

  • Thin black lines, described as penciling, are found in the tan color of the toes and lower legs.

  • Low maintenance grooming.

Health and Wellness:
  • Tends to overeat.

  • Severe genetic problems with the bleeding disorder known as von Willebrand’s disease.

  • Glaucoma and lens luxation.

What you should know:
  • Once used as a ratter in stables.

  • In an 1880 rat killing contest, a Manchester Terrier called Billy dispatched 100 rodents in just over six minutes.

  • Very graceful in its movements.

  • Breeders describe the Manchester as “pleasant” and “a dog that cares, adapting itself to your moods”.

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Standard Schnauzer

Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Germany

  • 1400′s

Height:
  • 17 ...

read more
Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Germany

  • 1400′s

Height:
  • 17 to 19 inches at shoulder

Weight:
  • 30 to 50 pounds

Personality:
  • A serious-minded worker.  The Standard Schnauzer takes its duties as a home protector to heart.

  • Tends to be a one-person dog.

  • Enjoys joining in rough and tumble activities.

  • Not only intelligent, but trainable.

History:

Schnauzers come in three sizes:  Miniature, Giant and Standard.  The two extremes are believed to have sprung from the middle or standard size which is at least 500 years old.  Although the smaller member of the trio is considered a terrier by the American Kennel Club (AKC), the two larger Schnauzers—also with obvious terrier origins—are classified as working dogs.  These Germanic members of the terrier tribe are less fiery than their British cousins and eminently suited for a life of service.  Standard Schnauzers are in demand around the world as guardians and police dogs.  Standard Schnauzers were imported into the United States for show purposes in the 1920′s.

Body Type:
  • A stocky dog, the Standard Schnauzer has a decidedly square shape.

  • Typical rough-coated terrier appearance.

  • Has distinctive arched eyebrows, bristly mustache, and whiskers.

  • Tail is set moderately high and carried erect.  It is always docked to not less than one-inch or more than two-inches.

  • The ears are set high.  They can be either cropped and erect, or natural and folded.

Coat:
  • Tight, hard, wiry and as thick as possible.  It is composed of a soft, close undercoat and a harsh outer coat.

  • Allowed colors are pepper-and-salt or pure black.

  • The gray salt-and-peppers are the most common.

  • The grizzle color is the result not of a mixture of light and dark hairs, but of agouti coloration that has banded patterns of light and dark on a single hair.

  • Grooming requires the plucking or stripping of long, dead hairs.

  • Eyebrows and beard need shaping with scissors.

  • Professional grooming may be necessary.

Health and Wellness:
  • Generally healthy overall.

  • Hip dysplasia. Pulmonic stenosis.

  • Schnauzer comedo syndrome.

  • Melanoma (cutaneous).

  • Skin tumors.

What you should know:
  • In 1879, the winner of the first show in which the then named Wirehaired Pinschers were exhibited was named Schnauzer.  He was such a superior animal that his name became generic for the entire breed.

  • It was a most suitable name too, because in German the word, Schnauze means muzzle or face, especially pointing out the hallmark beard and mustache.

  • Salt-and-pepper is the more common color by far.

  • It will prove difficult to find a solid black puppy to purchase.

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Thai Ridgeback

Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Thailand

  • 1600′s

Height:
  • ...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Thailand

  • 1600′s

Height:
  • 23 to 26 inches

Weight:
  • 60 to 65 pounds

Personality:
  • Tough and active.

  • Excellent watchdog.

History:

An ancient dog, this breed was unknown outside of its homeland until about 360 years ago when it was seen on the island of Dao Phu Quoc.  Because it has a ridge of hair running against the rest of the coat, it is thought to share a common ancestry with the Rhodesian Ridgeback.  Like the Rhodesian Ridgeback, the Thai Ridgeback is a very fierce guard and watchdog.  It is still extremely rare outside of its country of origin, but is beginning to be noticed by dog fanciers in other countries.

Body Type:
  • Medium-size, well-muscled dog.

  • The long tail is held vertically or curved like a sickle.  It is not altered.

  • The ears are large and carried erect.

  • Eyes are usually light in color, giving the gaze a fierce intensity.

Coat:
  • Short and smooth.

  • Allowed colors are black, gray, blue, and shades of red.

  • Minimal grooming required.

  • Hair along the ridge of the back grows opposite to the rest of the coat.  It begins with a pair of whorls behind the shoulders and extends about half way down the back.

Health and Wellness:
  • Generally robust.

What you should know:
  • Early training and socialization is recommended.

  • This dog is agile, energetic, and likes to jump so be prepared to get lots of exercise.

  • Its tongue is blue or bluish-gray in color.

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Tibetan Spaniel

Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Tibet

  • 1000 BC

Height:
  • 10...

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Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Tibet

  • 1000 BC

Height:
  • 10 inches

Weight:
  • 9 to 15 pounds

Personality:
  • Very intelligent but stubborn.

  • Aloof with strangers.

  • Affectionate with family members.

  • Alert and happy.

History:

The name Spaniel is a misnomer.  This ancient breed from Tibet is probably the ancestor of the Pekingese.  It has been kept by monks for over 3,000 years.  The little dog was trained to walk on a treadmill, which turned prayer wheels that the monks believed sent prayers to heaven.  The holy dogs were given to the emperors of China as tribute gifts and surely figure in the backgrounds of many of the Chinese breeds.  One of the first of the Tibetan breeds to reach the West, the Spaniels appeared in England about 1900 and looked much like the Pekingese of the time.  Refinements in England have brought the two breeds to their present forms.  The Tibetan Spaniel has much more leg under it and is not so exaggerated in form as the Pekingese.  Tibetan Spaniels were recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1984.

Body Type:
  • Somewhat similar in appearance to the Pekingese but less exaggerated.

  • The mouth is supposed to be undershot.

  • The high-set, plume tail is carried over the back and is not altered.

  • The medium-sized, hanging ears are never altered.

Coat:
  • The silky-textured, double coat is moderately long.

  • All colors and mixtures of colors are acceptable.

  • Moderate grooming required.

Health and Wellness:
  • Progressive retinal atrophy.

  • Kidney disease.

What you should know:
  • Despite its name, this is not a true spaniel, which is a hunting dog.  The Tibetan Spaniel is a companion animal.

  • Long-lived.

  • Obedience training is recommended.

  • May be difficult to housebreak.

  • Well suited to apartment living.

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Toy Manchester

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Toy Black and Tan Terrier (no longer used)

Country/Date of...
read more
Other names/Nicknames:
  • Toy Black and Tan Terrier (no longer used)

Country/Date of origin:
  • England

  • 1500′s

Height:
  • 10 to 12 inches

Weight:
  • Under 12 pounds

Personality:
  • One-family dog that is reserved with strangers.

  • Alert and quick to bark an alarm.

  • Is less aggressive than the Standard variety.

History:

There are two sizes of the Manchester Terrier, the Toy and the Standard.  Both spring from the same stock, one of the oldest strains of British terrier.  In the Manchester district of England, the breed was developed for poor-man’s sports—rat killing and rabbit coursing.  Judicious crossings of the now extinct Black and Tan Terrier and Whippets gave the Manchester what was wanted in a rat and rabbit dog—the fire and courage of the Terrier and the speed of the little Greyhounds. In 1923, the American Kennel Club (AKC) adopted the name of Manchester Terrier.  Until 1959, the Toy and the Standard were registered as two separate breeds, although interbreeding between the two breeds was permitted.  Since that date, they have been registered as a single breed with two varieties.  A single litter may have both varieties:  those under 12 pounds being shown as Toys, and those over 12 pounds shown as Standards.

Body Type:
  • Everything about this small terrier is sleek, from the long, unbroken line of the face to the tapering tail.

  • Classes at shows are often divided into two groups: seven pounds and under, and over seven pounds but not exceeding 12 pounds.

  • The erect ears of the Toy variety of the Manchester must not be altered.  Standard Manchesters can have button ears, drop ears, or cropped, erect ears.

  • Long whiplike tail is unaltered.

Coat:
  • Sleek, short, coat lies close to the body and is very glossy.

  • Only color allowed is jet black with mahogany tan markings on the legs and head.

  • A small tan spot on the side of each cheek and over each eye is required.

  • Thin black lines, described as penciling, are found in the tan color of the toes and lower legs.

  • Low maintenance grooming.

Health and Wellness:
  • Tends to overeat.

  • Severe genetic problems with the bleeding disorder known as von Willebrand’s disease.

  • Glaucoma and lens luxation.

What you should know:
  • Once used as a ratter in stables.

  • In an 1880 rat killing contest, a Manchester Terrier called Billy dispatched 100 rodents in just over six minutes.

  • Very graceful in its movements.

  • Breeders describe the Manchester as “pleasant” and “a dog that cares, adapting itself to your moods”.

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Yorkshire Terrier

Personality:
  • Intelligent and very affectionate.

  • Good-natured and determined.

  • Love...

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Personality:
  • Intelligent and very affectionate.

  • Good-natured and determined.

  • Love aerial acrobatics and perching on high places.

History:

According to legend, Mohammed, founder of the Islamic faith, possessed a Turkish Angora.  Angoras found their way to Europe in the early 1600′s and were exported to America in the 1700′s.  The breed was used extensively in Persian breeding programs to add length and silkiness to the Persian coat.  The Turkish government started a breeding program to preserve the breed in the early part of the 20th century.  Angoras were imported into the United States from Turkey in 1962, and were accepted for championship in the Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA) in 1973.

Body Type:
  • Medium-sized with a long, lithe, graceful torso and fine bones.

  • Head is wedge-shaped with tufted, long, pointed ears.

  • Eyes are large and almond shaped and can be amber, green, blue, hazel, or odd eyed.

Coat:
  • Silky, non-matting coat is medium long, fine, and slightly wavy.

  • Tail is plume like.

  • Colors include any color or pattern with the exception of chocolate, lavender, or the himalayan pattern.  White is the most frequently seen color.

Health and Wellness:
  • Blue eyed white cats are frequently born deaf—a defect that is related to color, not to the Turkish Angora breed.  Deafness should not be considered a major problem in an indoor pet.

  • No breed specific genetic defects have been reported.

What you should know:
  • Despite their graceful, delicate appearance, Angoras are very sturdy and strong.

  • Many Angoras enjoy swimming.

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Turkish Van

Personality:
  • Highly intelligent, independent, and loyal.

  • Active and playful.

  • ...
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Personality:
  • Highly intelligent, independent, and loyal.

  • Active and playful.

  • Fascinated by water, some Vans enjoy swimming.

History:

Rare and ancient natural breed that developed in the Lake Van region of Turkish Armenia.  Considered as valuable treasures in their homeland.  In 1955, two English women traveling in Turkey obtained two pairs of Vans and began a breeding program in England, from where the breed was exported to other countries throughout the world.  Accepted for championship in the Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA) in 1994.

Body Type:
  • Large and sturdy, with a deep chest, long body, and dense-muscle tone.

  • Head is refined, with a small muzzle and high cheekbones.

  • Ears are large, and set high and well apart.

  • Eyes are large, rounded, almond shaped and can be amber, blue, or odd eyed.

Coat:
  • Semi-long, non- matting coat has a cashmere like texture.

  • Coat has water repellent quality.

  • Predominantly white with colored markings restricted to the head and tail.

  • Colored markings can be auburn, cream, black, blue, tortoiseshell, or blue cream with tabby patterns and should not cover more than 20% of the cat’s body.

Health and Wellness:
  • Some lines have had problems with pectus excavatum, a malformation of the skeletal structure in the upper body.  Severity will vary.  Cats with this defect are frequently fine as pets, but should not be used in breeding programs.

  • Temperament can be unpredictable.

What you should know:
  • Vans do not reach full maturity until they are three to five years of age.

  • Completely separate breed from the Turkish Angora.

  • Overall, Vans do not appreciate grooming.

  • Pets need to be taught to be combed or brushed, and need to be introduced to the bath at a young age.

  • Temperament is unpredictable.

  • Spend time with kittens before selecting your pet.

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Weimaraner

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Gray Ghost

  • Weimar Pointer

Country/Date of origin:
  • Germany

    ...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Gray Ghost

  • Weimar Pointer

Country/Date of origin:
  • Germany

  • Early 19th century

Height:
  • Females:  23 to 25 inches

  • Males:  25 to 27 inches

Weight:
  • 70 to 86 pounds

Personality:
  • A one-family dog that is not friendly to strangers.

  • Intelligent and assertive.  A combination that makes for difficulty in training.

  • Can be rambunctious.

  • Bubbles with energy and cannot stand to be confined.

  • Can be very destructive if not given enough exercise.

History:

The Weimaraner is an all-around hunter that was bred by aristocratic sportsmen in the Weimar region of Germany.  The breed was jealously guarded and no dogs were sold outside the close-knit circle of nobility in the Weimar court.  It was most likely created by crossing a Bloodhound type dog with German Shorthaired Pointers to get hunters with a better nose and a larger size.  This enabled them to hunt larger game such as wild boar.  In 1929, an American named Howard Knight got a pair of dogs ostensibly for breeding purposes, but the Germans had secretly neutered them.  These were later replaced with fertile dogs and the breed, amidst a great public relations campaign, flourished in the United States.  The short-haired variety was admitted to the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1943, but the long-haired variety is still unrecognized here.

Body Type:
  • A heavy, muscular, hunting pointer.

  • Long, hanging ears are rounded at tips and not altered.

  • Tail is docked to about six-inches long.

Coat:
  • The short, sleek, gray coat is the hallmark of the breed.

  • The gray color is slightly lighter on the head and ears.

  • The nose is also gray, and the eyes are a light amber or blue-gray, giving the dog the nickname of gray ghost.

  • Minimal grooming.

Health and Wellness:
  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Autoimmune thyroid disease.

  • Gastric dilatation and volvulus syndrome (GDV, also commonly called bloat).

  • Tricuspid dysplasia.

  • Hemophilia.

  • Spinal dysraphism.

  • Immunodeficient dwarfism.

  • Cryptorchidism.

  • Metabolic bone disease.

  • Demodicosis.

  • Muzzle pyoderma.

  • Mast cell tumor.

  • Oropharyngeal neoplasia.

What you should know:
  • There is a long-haired version of the Weimaraner but it is not recognized by the AKC.  Consequently, it is not often seen in the United States.

  • Popular with hunters who favor an all-around dog.

  • The Weimaraner can point, retrieve, and track.  It will also face big game that other softer pointers will refuse.

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Welsh Springer Spaniel

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Welsh Cocker

  • Starter

Country/Date of origin:
  • Great ...

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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Welsh Cocker

  • Starter

Country/Date of origin:
  • Great Britain

  • 1500′s

Height:
  • Females:  17 to 18 inche

    s
  • Males:  18 to 19 inches

Weight:
  • 35 to 45 pounds

Personality:
  • The merry ways of the spaniel are firmly fixed in this Welsh charmer.

  • It is hard to resist the loving attention a Welsh Springer will lavish on you.

  • Gentle, although able to take correction better than the other spaniels which fold under criticism.

  • Willing to please and moderately intelligent.

History:

One of the group of spaniels that works before the gun, springing or flushing birds for the hunter.  The ancestors of this breed are thought to have been brought to England with the Gauls in pre-Roman times.  Its similarity to the Brittany Spaniel is evidence for this theory.  Until 1900, it was little seen outside of Wales. Originally shown as a Welsh Cocker, it was granted separate breed status in England in 1902 and shown as the Welsh Springer Spaniel.  A breed club was formed in the United States in 1960 to promote the interests of the Welsh Springer.

Body Type:
  • Similar to the English Springer Spaniel, but shorter and more lightly built.

  • The tail is always docked to two thirds of the original length.

  • The fringed ears are small and hang close to the head.  They are not altered.

Coat:
  • The flat, straight coat is thick and silky.

  • The only allowed color is dark, rich red and white.

  • Moderate grooming required.

Health and Wellness:
  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Subject to epilepsy.

  • Progressive retinal atrophy.

  • Cataracts.

What you should know:
  • A rarely seen breed in the United States.  It is overshadowed by its English Springer cousin.

  • Finding a puppy will be difficult.

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West Highland Terrier

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Poltalloch Terrier

  • Roseneath Terrier

  • Westie

Country/Date...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Poltalloch Terrier

  • Roseneath Terrier

  • Westie

Country/Date of origin:
  • Scotland

  • 1800′s

Height:
  • 10 to 11 inches

Weight:
  • 15 to 22 pounds

Personality:
  • The sunniest disposition in the terrier family.

  • Choose your lifestyle and the Westie will happily adapt to it.

  • One of the few terriers that does well with other pets.

History:

The West Highland White Terrier has a shared history with the Cairn, Scottish, and Dandie Dinmont Terriers (all of which probably come from the same stock).  However, it was a single family—the Malcolms of Poltalloch, Scotland—that was responsible for refining the little white terriers that were originally called by the name of their estate.  Many hunters favored the white coats, which were easily visible in the field.  It is believed that the white coats were selectively bred when they popped up in litters of Cairn Terriers.  The Malcolms quite fancied these game, earth dogs and kept the white strain alive for over a hundred years.  First introduced at British shows in 1900, the Westies were introduced to American fanciers in 1908.  However, it was not until the 1960′s that they skyrocketed on the popularity charts.

Body Type:
  • A compact, wiry terrier with a short face and impish expression.

  • Very small, pointed, erect ears are not altered.

  • The short tail is natural, not docked.

  • Front feet are bigger than hind feet, as might be expected in a digging dog.

Coat:
  • Harsh double coat about 2-inches long.

  • White is the only allowed color.

  • Requires professional grooming.

Health and Wellness:
  • Legg-Perthes disease.

  • Cranio-mandibular osteopathy.

  • Pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency.

  • Congenital deafness.

  • Globoid cell leukodystrophy.

  • Cataracts.

  • Atopy.

  • Generalized tremor.

  • Copper-storage hepatopathy.

  • Demodicosis.

  • Mitral insufficiency.

What you should know:
  • Sometimes referred to as the white dog in the Black and White Scotch ads, Westies are not white, Scottish Terriers.  This breed is much more upbeat and less quarrelsome.

  • Excessive barking can be a problem if a Westie becomes bored.

  • Likes to dig under fences, whereupon it will set out to see the world.

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Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Korthals Griffon

Country/Date of origin:
  • France

  • 1800′s

...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Korthals Griffon

Country/Date of origin:
  • France

  • 1800′s

Height:
  • Females:  20 to 22 inches

  • Males:  22 to 24 inches

Weight:
  • 50 to 60 pounds

Personality:
  • Affectionate with family and willing to please.

  • High-strung, which can lead to timidness.

  • Wary of strangers.

  • Intelligent and trainable.

History:

This breed owes its existence to a Dutchman named Edward Korthals, who started in 1870 with a Barbet dog and mixed her bloodlines with various setters, spaniels, and pointers to create a new, sporting dog.  A family feud forced him to leave Holland and continue his breeding experiments in Germany and France.  The breed type was fixed by the beginning of the 20th century, and the dog exhibited the skills of both a pointer and a retriever.  Its harsh coat and swimming abilities enabled it to be utilized for both water and field work.

Body Type:
  • A rough-coated, gun dog with legs that are short compared with length of the body.

  • Medium-length, hanging ears are not altered.

  • Tail is docked to a third of its original length and held level with top line of the back

Coat:
  • A harsh, stiff outercoat with eyebrows, mustache, and beard.  Undercoat is soft and fine.

  • Permissible colors are solid chestnut, steel-gray, gray-white, or dirty-white with or without chestnut splashes.

  • The solid chestnut is not desirable and solid black is a disqualification.

  • Moderate grooming required.  The dog is supposed to have a shaggy, unkempt look.

Health and Wellness:
  • Very healthy breed.

  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Thyroid problems may lead to skin allergies.

  • Follicular dysplasia.

What you should know:
  • Not a suitable dog for the city.

  • It will become high-strung and hyperactive if not given enough exercise.

  • A good swimmer.

  • Puppies are born white or white with liver spots.

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Vizsla

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Hungarian Vizsla

Country/Date of origin:
  • Hungary

  • 9th...

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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Hungarian Vizsla

Country/Date of origin:
  • Hungary

  • 9th century

Height:
  • Females:  21 to 23 inches

  • Males:  22 to 24 inches

Weight:
  • 48-1/2 to 66 pounds

Personality:
  • Affectionate with family and easygoing.

  • Alert and watchful.

  • Barks if aroused.

  • Boundless energy.

  • Not happy confined indoors.

  • Intelligent but extremely headstrong.

  • Can be difficult to housebreak.

  • Very reserved with strangers.

History:

On the steppes of Hungary, where game was plentiful, this superb hunting dog flourished for centuries.  Thought to have been brought by the Magyar people when they conquered the land, this dog is an excellent pointer, retriever and tracker.  It was especially suited to tracking partridges and rabbits in the tall grass steppes.  The numbers of Vizsla dropped dramatically as its homeland was ravaged amidst World War I and II.  In the Russian occupation that followed, families fleeing to western European countries brought the dogs with them and extended the breed’s popularity.  Vizslas were admitted to the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1960.

Body Type:
  • A medium-sized, athletic, pointer-type of gun dog with a distinctive golden-russet coat.

  • Low set tail is docked to a medium length.

  • Long, thin ears with a rounded tip are not altered.

Coat:
  • Short, smooth, close lying coat.

  • Permissible colors are golden russet from a rusty gold to a dark, sandy yellow.

  • Eyes must harmonize with the coat color and the nose must be brown rather than black.

  • Minimal grooming.

Health and Wellness:
  • Calcinosis circumscripta.

  • Hemophilia.

  • Sebaceous adenitis.

What you should know:
  • Vizslas come in a wirehaired variety, although this is rarely seen in the United States.

  • The dog is named after a town in Hungary.

  • Clean and easy to live with.

  • Does not do well in an apartment, and really is not all that suited to the suburbs either.  This is a country dog.

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Welsh Corgi Pembroke

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Ci Llaathaid (meaning Yard Long Dog)

Country/Date of origin:
    ...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Ci Llaathaid (meaning Yard Long Dog)

Country/Date of origin:
  • Great Britain

  • 1200′s

Height:
  • 10 to 12 inches at shoulder

Weight:
  • 25 to 38 pounds

Personality:
  • Bright and alert, but only moderately active.

  • Intelligent and very willing to please.

  • Easily trained. However, the Corgi will train you with ease if you are not careful.

  • Playful nature.

  • Good watchdog.

  • Reserved with strangers.

  • Noisy.

History:

In the Pembrokeshire district of Wales, the Corgi without a tail has been the all around farm dog for centuries.  It is an excellent cattle drover and vermin router.  Although it has been interbred with the Cardigan Corgi since the 19th century, it did not have the same ancestors.  The Cardigan has dachshunds and farm collies in its background, and the Pembroke descended from northern spitz-type dogs.  The small size is an asset in the Corgi’s style of droving.  It nips the heels of the cows, and when they kick in retaliation, it drops to the ground to avoid the flying heels.  The little dog is fearless—seemingly unaware that it is so small.  The first Corgis were shown in Britain in 1925, with both types in a single class.  In 1934, the two varieties were separated for show purposes.

Body Type:
  • Sturdy dog whose body is long in relationship to its very short legs.

  • Muscular in appearance.

  • The tail is very short and, if not naturally bobtail, is always docked.

  • The ears are erect, of medium size, and are not altered.  The Pembroke’s ears are set closer together and are smaller than the Cardigan’s.

Coat:
  • The straight, medium-length coat lies flat and is harsh to the touch.

  • Permissible colors are red, sable, fawn, black, or tan, with or without white markings.

  • Minimal amount of grooming necessary.

Health and Wellness:
  • Hip dysplasia.

  • von Willebrand’s disease.

  • Dystocia.

  • Intervertebral disc disease (IVDD).

  • Idiopathic epilepsy.

  • Atopy.

  • Food allergy.

What you should know:
  • The Pembroke is much more popular than the Cardigan.

  • The Pembroke enjoys the patronage of the Queen of England.  Her father, King George VI, gave two Pembrokes to his daughters as childhood pets.  She still fancies the breed and is often photographed with them.

  • Does well in an apartment.

  • Owners often have two Corgis so they can amuse themselves when left alone.

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Welsh Terrier

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Old English Terrier

  • Black and Tan Wire Haired Terrier

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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Old English Terrier

  • Black and Tan Wire Haired Terrier

Country/Date of origin:
  • Wales

  • 1500′s

Height:
  • 14 to 15 inches

Weight:
  • 20 to 21 pounds

Personality:
  • Active and playful, the Welsh Terrier is a charmer.

  • Very much a one-family dog.

  • Less volatile than the Lakeland or the Wire Haired Fox Terrier.  The Welsh will not back down from trouble if he finds it.

History:

The recorded history of the Welsh Terrier goes back to the 1500′s.  By the 1700′s, it was customarily used with fox hunting packs in the northern part of Wales.  The long-legged terrier was able to keep up with the horses but was still small enough to go after fox or badger below the ground.  Show classes were offered for the Welsh Terrier at English shows in the 1880′s.  By 1901 there were enough of the breed in America to offer classes for them at American Kennel Club (AKC) shows.

Body Type:
  • A medium-sized, rough-coated terrier with a distinctive patterning of the coat.

  • Often confused with the Lakeland Terrier, the Welsh can be distinguished by its broader head and sparser facial hair.

  • Button ears are not altered.

  • Erect tail is docked.

Coat:
  • The workman-like coat is weather resistant and double.  The outer hairs are hard and wiry and the undercoat soft.

  • The preferred color is black and tan but black, grizzle and tan is also permitted.

  • Requires professional grooming.

Health and Wellness:
  • Generally hardy.

  • Lens luxation.

What you should know:
  • Puppies are usually born solid black. The dark color recedes quickly and the blanketed, black and tan pattern should be visible by the time the pup is three or four months old.

  • More level-headed than most terriers.

  • Welsh Terriers are excellent outfielders in a ball game.

  • Relative rarity of the Welsh Terrier may make a puppy hard to find in some parts of the country.

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Whippet

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Snap Dog

Country/Date of origin:
  • England

  • 19th century

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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Snap Dog

Country/Date of origin:
  • England

  • 19th century

Height:
  • Females:  18 to 21 inches

  • Males:  19 to 22 inches

Weight:
  • 28 pounds

Personality:
  • Gentle and affectionate.

  • Gets along well with other dogs and indoor cats.

  • Extraordinarily clean in its personal habits.  Almost cat-like.

  • Adores being pampered.

  • Intelligent and more trainable that most sighthounds.

History:

About 150 years ago, Greyhounds were crossed with several different breeds of terrier to produce a dog that would be speedy enough to course rabbits but small and agile enough to go after rats.  The dogs were known as the poor-man’s greyhound and were traditionally run over a 200-yard course.  They were called snap dogs because the owners stood at the finish and urged them on by snapping rags to attract their attention.  Whippets are one of the fastest dogs for their weight and can reach speeds in excess of 35 miles per hour.

Body Type:
  • A slim, racing dog that looks like a miniature version of the Greyhound.

  • Rose ears, carried close to neck, are not altered.

  • Long, tapering tail is carried low and is not altered.  It is used as a rudder when the dog is turning at high speed.

Coat:
  • Short, glossy coat that lies close to the body.

  • Any color allowed.  Few other dogs come in as many variations as the Whippet.

  • Minimal grooming.

Health and Wellness:
  • Cryptorchidism.

  • Pattern baldness.

  • Idiopathic onchodystrophy.

  • Demodecosis.

  • Hemangiosarcoma (cutaneous).

  • Hemangiomas (actinic).

  • Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, actinic).

What you should know:
  • Whippet track racing is a popular sport in the United States.  They run a shorter course than their Greyhound cousins, but it is just as exciting to watch them chase the mechanical bunny.

  • Whippets do not like the cold.  If you fancy a dog that will willingly wear a fashionable coat, this is the breed for you.

  • The delicate appearance of the Whippet is misleading.  This dog is more robust than it looks.

  • Adapts well to city life, if given a good leash walk once a day.

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Yorkshire Terrier

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Formerly called a Broken Haired Scotch Terrier

  • Yorkie

     
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Formerly called a Broken Haired Scotch Terrier

  • Yorkie

     
Country/Date of origin:
  • England

  • 1800′s

Height:
  • 7 to 9 inches

Weight:
  • Less than 7 pounds (some are a mere two pounds)

Personality:
  • Sweet and loving, the Yorkie is the ultimate lap dog.

  • Loves to be pampered.

  • Intelligent and willing to please.

  • Tends to be noisy.

  • Good watchdog despite its size.

  • Yorkies are very alert.

History:

The Yorkshire Terrier was originally a ratter, kept to control rats in the coal mines of northern England.  If this is hard to believe about the extremely tiny, glamorously coated breed, keep in mind that the early dogs were much larger, weighing around 15 pounds.  The miniaturization took place in the mid 1800′s in England.  The Yorkshire Terrier has been shown in the United States since 1878 and the early classes were divided by weight.

Body Type:
  • A long-haired, toy terrier with a high-head carriage and a confident manner.

  • Prick ears are not altered.

  • Tail is docked to a medium length and is carried slightly above the level of the back.

Coat:
  • The long, silky, single coat is fine in texture.  It must be perfectly straight.

  • The fall on the head is tied with a bow (traditionally red) in the center of the head, or parted and fastened with two bows.

  • The hair is parted along the center of the back.

  • The coat of a show-conditioned Yorkshire Terrier should sweep the ground.  Because it is easily broken, the hair is wrapped between shows in little paper covered packets and tied with rubber bands.

  • The only color allowed is a steel blue accented with tan points.

  • Daily grooming required.

  • The coat tangles easily.  It does not shed much.

Health and Wellness:
  • Juvenile hypoglycemia.

  • Hydrocephalus.

  • Retained primary teeth.

  • Portosystemic shunts.

  • von Willebrand’s disease.

  • Patent ductus arteriosis.

  • Atlantoaxial subluxation.

  • Legg-Perthes disease.

  • Distichiasis.

  • Shaker syndrome.

  • Yorkie encephalitis.

  • Melanoderma.

  • Tracheal collapse.

  • Calcium oxalate urolithiasis.

  • Lymphangiectasia.

  • Melanoderma.

  • Generalized tremor.

  • Cushing’s syndrome.

  • Mitral insufficiency.

  • Keratoconjuncitivitis sicca.

What you should know:
  • Yorkies resemble a caterpillar when they walk.  The feet are not visible and the dog seems to flow along.

  • The tiny dogs are very fragile and rough play will injure them.

  • Good quality Yorkshire Terriers that are very small (about 2 or 3 pounds) are expensive.  Five or six thousand dollars is not unusual for a really tiny one.

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Santo, TX 76472

Phone. 940-769-2222

Fax. 866-632-3365

Email. texaswestvet@gmail.com