BREED INFORMATION

Belgian Shepherd

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Belgian Sheepdog
Country/Date of origin:
  • Belgium
  • 1200′s
...
read more
Other names/Nicknames:
  • Belgian Sheepdog
Country/Date of origin:
  • Belgium
  • 1200′s
Height:
  • 22 to 26 inches
Weight:
  • 60 to 70 pounds
Personality:
  • Very intelligent.
  • Trustworthy around people and property.
  • A no-nonsense dog with an innate sense of duty.
  • Cautious of strangers.
  • Makes a fine watchdog.
  • Loyal and affectionate to its family.
History:

There are three herding dogs known collectively as the Belgian Shepherds.  They share the same standard and are identical except for coat and color.  The most popular is the long-haired Tervuren, which is a rich mahogany overlaid with sooty black.  The Gronendael, a long-haired solid black dog is usually referred to as the Belgian Sheepdog.  The short- haired variety is the Malinois, which is a brown or tan color with black mask and ears.  They are shown as varieties of a single breed in some countries and as three separate breeds in others, including their Belgian homeland.  The American Kennel Club (AKC) has considered them as three separate breeds since 1959.

Body Type:
  • Has a square, muscular body.
  • Medium-length, bushy tail is carried low and is never altered.
  • The ears are erect and are not altered.
Coat:
  • Long, straight, moderately-harsh, double coat lies flat to the body.
  • Moderate grooming required except when shedding in the spring and fall.
  • Color is a solid black.
  • Small bits of white are allowed but not desired.
Health and Wellness:
  • Generally healthy.
  • Subject to hip dysplasia.
What you should know:
  • This breed can be too aggressive.
  • It was bred to protect flocks from attack by wolves and wild dogs.  It still has that strong territorial protectiveness and it is sometimes misplaced.
  • The black variety is the most popular world wide.
  • This breed was used as a war dog in World War I and II.

 

read less

Belgian Tervuren

Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Belgium

  • 1200′s

Height:
  • ...
read more
Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Belgium

  • 1200′s

Height:
  • Females:  22 to 24 inches

  • Males:  24 to 26 inches

Weight:
  • 60 to 70 pounds

Personality:
  • Very intelligent.

  • Trustworthy around people and property.

  • A no-nonsense dog with an innate sense of duty.

  • Cautious of strangers.

  • Makes a fine watchdog.

  • Loyal and affectionate to its family.

History:

There are three herding dogs known collectively as the Belgian Shepherds.  They share the same standard and are identical except for coat and color.  The most popular is the long-haired Tervuren, which is a rich mahogany overlaid with sooty black.  There is another equally popular long-haired variety called the Gronendael, which is solid black.  The short-haired variety is the Malinois, which is a brown or tan color with black mask and ears.  They are shown as varieties of a single breed in some countries and as three separate breeds in others, including their Belgian homeland.  The American Kennel Club (AKC) has considered them as three separate breeds since 1959.

Body Type:
  • Has a square, muscular body.

  • Medium-length, bushy tail is carried low and is never altered.

  • The ears are erect and are not altered.

Coat:
  • Long, straight, moderately-harsh, double coat that lies flat to the body.

  • Moderate grooming required except when shedding in the spring and fall.

  • Color is a rich mahogany with sooty tipped guard hairs.  This color is known as fauve de charbonne.

Health and Wellness:
  • Generally healthy

  • Gastric carcinoma.

What you should know:
  • This breed can be too aggressive.  It was bred to protect flocks from attack by wolves and wild dogs.

  • It still has that strong, territorial protectiveness and it is sometimes misplaced.

  • One of the few breeds with a distinct color difference between the sexes.  Males have much stronger soot markings than the females.

  • This breed was used as a war dog in World War I and II.

read less

Bengal

Personality:
  • Intelligent, loving, very active, and curious.

  • Bengals less than four...

read more
Personality:
  • Intelligent, loving, very active, and curious.

  • Bengals less than four generations from a cross with the Asian Leopard cat may lack a domestic nature (varies with each individual cat).

  • Many Bengals love to play in water.

  • Only Bengals with a four generation pedigree of Bengal to Bengal breeding are eligible to compete for championship titles in The International Cat Association (TICA).

History:

Breed derived from crossing a domestic cat with the Asian Leopard Cat, a non-endangered species that resembles the Ocelot or Marguay.  First documented cross in the United States occurred in 1963 through the efforts of Jean Mill of Covina, California who wanted to create a domestic cat that had the physical characteristics of the Asian Leopard Cat.  The leopard patterned Bengal was accepted for championship status in TICA in 1991. The snow and marbled versions were accepted in 1994. The Bengal is not recognized by the Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA) because of the cat’s wild blood.

Body Type:
  • Medium to large in size, sleek, and very muscular.

  • Head is a broad, modified wedge with rounded contours.

  • Eye color may be gold, green to blue green depending on coat color.

Coat:
  • Glossy coat is short to medium in length.

  • Base coat colors can be ivory, gray or golden orange.

  • Two patterns available: leopard spotted (dark spots on a lighter ground color) and marbled (swirls of black or brown spotted colors flowing in a horizontal pattern over the lighter ground color).

Health and Wellness:
  • Since this breed was developed by crossing domestic cats with the non-domesticated Asian Leopard Cat, a gentle temperament is essential.  This is true even in a playful kitten.

  • Reputable breeders work for good dispositions and recommend that pets be at least four generations away from a cross with an Asian Leopard Cat to insure a sweet, loving pet.

What you should know:
  • Good Bengals demand good prices.

  • Do your homework and buy your Bengal from a reputable breeder who will help you choose a Bengal that will be right for your personality and lifestyle.

  • Cats that are the result of a mating with a Leopard Cat, or other allowable outcross, are called F1.

  • Successive generations of Bengal to Bengal breedings are termed as F2, F3 and then SBT.

  • SBT’s are usually the best choice for a domestic temperament.

read less

Berger Des Pyrenees

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Labri

  • Pyrenean Sheepdog

Country/Date of origin:
  • France

  • ...
read more
Other names/Nicknames:
  • Labri

  • Pyrenean Sheepdog

Country/Date of origin:
  • France

  • 1700′s

Height:
  • 15 to 19 inches

Weight:
  • 40 pounds

Personality:
  • Lively with quick reflexes.

  • Intelligent with an excellent memory.

  • Courageous, faithful, and dependable.

  • Herding abilities instinctive, as are ratting prowess.

  • Naturally protective.

History:

The small Sheepdog of the Pyrenees Mountains is considered the oldest of the French herding dogs.  It was used in concert with the large, white, sheep-guardian dogs of the region.  The little dog herded the sheep.  The big dog watched over them.  The natural abilities of this shaggy shepherd are legend.  It was officially recognized by the French Kennel Club in 1921, but it has not made much of a name for itself outside its homeland.

Body Type:
  • A small, shaggy Sheepdog.

  • Ears are cropped to stand upright or left natural.

  • Tail is docked or is a natural bobtail.

  • Double dewclaws are a hallmark of the breed.

Coat:
  • Long, shaggy, coarse hair is water resistant.

  • Hair on the tail and loins is woolly.

  • There are two varieties.  One has long hair all over the body, and the other has shorter hair on the face.

  • Permissible colors are harlequin or fawn, with or without brindle markings.

  • Moderate grooming required.

Health and Wellness:
  • Remarkably hardy.

  • Particularly resistant to distemper.

What you should know:
  • In World War I, the Berger des Pyrenees was used to carry messages and search for the wounded.  Many were killed on the battlefields.

  • This active little dog needs a job to do.  Will become frustrated, and perhaps destructive, if not given mental and physical exercise.

read less

Bernese Mountain Dog

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Berner Sennenhund

Country/Date of origin:
  • Switzerland

  • 100...

read more
Other names/Nicknames:
  • Berner Sennenhund

Country/Date of origin:
  • Switzerland

  • 100 BC

Height:
  • Females:  23 to 26 inches

  • Males:  25 to 27-1/2 inches

Weight:
  • 87 to 90 pounds

Personality:
  • A very dominant, take-charge animal.

  • Pleasant to be around.

  • Cautious with strangers.

  • Loyal and steadfast.

  • A serious nature is innate.

  • Does not fawn.

  • Learns slowly but it retains what it is taught.

History:

One of four tri-colored dogs from the Swiss mountains, the Bernese is the only long-haired member of the quartet.  It is the only one of the four that is not a herding dog.  It was bred in the area around Berne as a draft animal.  Its primary job was to haul milk (down the mountains) to market, but it is also a superb guard dog and will drove cattle when necessary.  This dog, of the mastiff family, is a descendant of dogs that invading Roman soldiers brought as livestock guards and drovers 2,000 years ago.  This is the most popular of the four breeds.

Body Type:
  • Have a rather compact build for their size.

  • The tail is of medium length and is carried low.  It is not altered.

  • The ears hang slightly forward and are held next to the face.  They are not altered.

Coat:
  • Long and slightly wavy, without being curly.  It is exceptionally thick.

  • Color is very important.  There is only one permissible:  jet-black, with deep tan or rust markings on all legs.

  • A white blaze on the head (extending between the eyes) and a white chest marking (known as a cross) are essential.

  • White paws are preferred.

  • Moderate to heavy grooming needed.

  • Seasonal shedding is heavy.

Health and Wellness:
  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Elbow dysplasia.

  • Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD).

  • Meningitis.

  • Histiocytosis.

  • Histiocytic sarcomas.

What you should know:
  • Nicknamed the bear cub.

  • If used to guard cattle, the Berner is a tyrant.  It keeps all its charges in line with a firm paw.

read less

Bombay

Personality:
  • Intelligent and easily trained.

  • Loyal and devoted to their humans.

  • ...
read more
Personality:
  • Intelligent and easily trained.

  • Loyal and devoted to their humans.

  • Only cat that is judged 55% on color and coat.

  • This combination of Burmese and American Shorthair has resulted in a cat that is hardier and less vocal than the Burmese.

History:

Created by a breeder in Kentucky who crossed a copper-eyed, black American Shorthair with a sable Burmese in an attempt to create a mini-panther.  Named after the black leopard of India and the city of Bombay.  Breeders are still allowed to outcross to Burmese for type and to black American Shorthairs for color.  Accepted for championship status by the Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA) in 1976, 18 years after the breeding program began.

Body Type:
  • Medium-size, well-balanced, muscular cat.

  • Head is rounded without a snubbed nose look.

  • Ears are medium and slightly rounded.

  • Eyes are bright gold to copper, with copper preferred in the show ring.

Coat:
  • Coat is short, with a satin-like texture and patent-leather sheen.

  • Solid jet black.

  • The International Cat Association (TICA) accepts sable in addition to black.

Health and Wellness:
  • Bombays are a hybrid created by crossing sable Burmese with black American Shorthair cats.  As a rule, creating hybrids brings hybrid vigor to the breed.

What you should know:
  • Use a soft chamois cloth to keep your Bombay looking sleek and glossy.

read less

Border Collie

Other names/Nicknames:

  • None

Country/Date of origin:

  • Great Britain

  • 1700′s

...
read more

Other names/Nicknames:

  • None

Country/Date of origin:

  • Great Britain

  • 1700′s

Height:

  • Females:  18 to 21 inches

  • Males:  19 to 22 inches

Weight:

  • 30 to 44 pounds

Personality:

  • One-person dogs that are intensely loyal and protective.

  • Super intelligent and trainable.

  • Does not tend to wander and doesn’t like owner to wander off property either.

  • Reserved with strangers

  • Needs room to run.

  • Becomes hyperactive if not give exercise daily.

History:

The early history of England’s working-stock dog is obscure.  It is known that it was in its present form by the 18th century.  This is a breed that is first and foremost a working animal.  Although it was a pet in Victorian England, most of the bloodlines were selectively bred for herding abilities and intelligence rather than looks.  In the sheep-raising countries of Australia and New Zealand, it reigns supreme in both numbers and prestige.  In 1995, it was accepted for registry in the American Kennel Club (AKC) stud books.

Body Type:

  • A medium-sized, working dog that is slightly longer than it is tall.

  • The long tail, carried low, is not altered.

  • Semi-erect or erect ears are not altered.

Coat:

  • Medium-length, double coat is water resistant.

  • Coat is longer around the neck forming a ruff.

  • Allowed colors are black, blue, chocolate, red, blue merle, black and tan, with or without white markings.  White, however, should not predominate.

  • Moderate grooming required.

Health and Wellness:

  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Congenital deafness.

  • Collie-eye anomaly.

  • Cryptorchidism.

  • Progressive retinal atrophy.

What you should know:

  • The superstar of obedience competitions, it seems to know what you want even before you do.

  • This breed tends to nip at heels of joggers and cyclists.  It also challenges cars, a trait that gets it into trouble from time to time.

  • Most of the billion sheep in the world are watched over by Border Collies.  It is the working sheepdog of choice almost everywhere.

read less

Border Terrier

Other names:
  • Coquetdale Terrier
  • Reedwater Terrier
Country/Date of origin:
  • Border...
read more
Other names:
  • Coquetdale Terrier
  • Reedwater Terrier
Country/Date of origin:
  • Border country between England and Scotland
  • 19th century
Height:
  • 12 to 13 inches at shoulder
Weight:
  • 12 to 15 pounds
Personality:
  • Unspoiled in looks and personality.
  • Gets along well with other pets.
  • Plucky and courageous, although not as argumentative as some other terriers.
  • Very upbeat and willing to please.
  • Can be strong willed.
History:

The Border Terrier, which had no particular name until the 1860′s, was bred by farmers in the hill country that makes up the border between Scotland and England.  Strangely enough, the terrier did not get its name from the border country but from a pack of foxhounds called the Border Hunt.  The little go-to-ground terriers, which followed the hunters, were used to roust the fox from its lair.  Working ability was favored above all, and to this day the rough-and-ready Borders retain the pluck and spirit necessary to go after a fox, badger or otter.  Fearful that acceptance into the show world would diminish the supremely important working abilities, Border breeders did not join the English Kennel Club until 1920.  Membership into the American Kennel Club (AKC) came even later, with the first dog registered in the 1927 Stud Book.

Body Type:
  • This no-frills working terrier has a compact body and a head that is similar to that of an otter.
  • Drop ears are not altered.
  • Tail is not altered.
Coat:
  • Harsh, wiry, double coat is very weather resistant.
  • Needs little grooming.  Even shown in natural state.
  • Red, wheaten, grizzle and tan, and blue and tan are the allowed colors.
Health and Wellness:
  • Ventricular septal defects.
  • Cushing’s syndrome (PDH and AT).
What you should know:
  • Unspoiled in looks and personality, the Border Terrier has never been a faddish breed and consequently has kept its true working ability.
  • Thick skinned (literally) to protect from the bites of fox, badger and otter.
  • Needs plenty of exercise.
read less

Borzoi

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Russian Wolfhound

Country/Date of origin:
  • Russia

  • 13th...

read more
Other names/Nicknames:
  • Russian Wolfhound

Country/Date of origin:
  • Russia

  • 13th century

Height:
  • Females:  From 26 inches

  • Males:  From 28 inches

Weight:
  • Females:  60 to 85 pounds

  • Males: 75 to 105 pounds

Personality:
  • The sensitive Borzoi cannot take criticism.

  • Prefers the company of adults.

  • Rather aloof and does not seek the attention of strangers.

  • Loyal and attentive to the master it chooses.

  • Intelligent but stubborn and difficult to train.

History:

The history of the Borzoi is inextricably linked with that of the Russian royalty.  The aristocracy developed the dog to hunt wolves and hares on the great open steppes of Russia.  The Borzoi was called a Russian Wolfhound in the United States until 1936 when the name was officially changed.

Body Type:
  • A very large, heavily-coated member of the greyhound family that combines speed and grace.

  • Rose ears, held tightly against neck, are not altered.

  • Long, gracefully-curved tail, which is used as a rudder when turning at high speeds, is not altered.

  • A narrow dog that rarely becomes overweight.

Coat:
  • Long, silky coat is either flat, wavy, or curly.

  • The coat is especially profuse on neck to protect from bites.

  • Any color is permissible.  However, most Borzoi are white or white with patches of color.

  • High grooming.

  • Excessive shedding.

Health and Wellness:
  • Autoimmune thyroid disease.

  • Metabolic bone disease.

  • Gastric dilatation and volvulus syndrome (GDV, also commonly called bloat).

  • Elbow hygromas.

  • Osteosarcoma.

What you should know:
  • The name Borzoi means swift in Russian.  It is pronounced Bor-zoy.

  • Not long-lived.

read less

Boston Terrier

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Yankee Terrier

  • Round Heads

  • American Bull Terrier

     
...
read more
Other names/Nicknames:
  • Yankee Terrier

  • Round Heads

  • American Bull Terrier

     
Country/Date of origin:
  • United States

  • 1800′s

Height:
  • 15 to 17 inches

Weight:
  • 10 to 25 pounds

Personality:
  • Very affectionate.

  • The Boston Terrier is not a terrier.  It does not have the fiery temperament of that tribe.

  • Dapper and intelligent.

  • Can have a stubborn streak.

History:

A breed made in the United States, the Boston Terrier is the result of a cross between an English Bulldog and a white English Terrier (a breed now extinct). The original Boston Terriers, which weighed 35 pounds, were considerably larger than the typical twenty-pound dog today.  Dog fanciers around Boston called the dog they developed the Round Head, Yankee Terrier, American Bull Terrier, and several other names.  When the breed was admitted to the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1893, it was decided that Boston Terrier would be used.

Body Type:
  • A distinctive , dapper-looking dog with a broad head, large, round eyes, and tuxedo markings.

  • The short tail is set low and is not carried above horizontal.  It can be either straight or screw.  It is never docked.

  • The ears are carried erect and are set at the corners of the skull.  They are sometimes cropped.

Coat:
  • Smooth, short, and shiny.

  • Permissible colors are brindle and white (which is preferred), or black and white.

  • A regular symmetry of the markings is extremely important in this breed.

  • The placement of the white is called tuxedo patterning.

  • There must be a white muzzle, a white blaze on the head, and white on the neck, chest, forelegs, and hind legs below the hocks.

  • Minimal grooming required.

Health and Wellness:
  • Calcinosis circumscripta.

  • Brachycephalic airway obstruction syndrome.

  • Hydrocephalus.

  • Cleft lip and palate.

  • Hemivertebrae.

  • Congenital deafness.

  • Tracheal hypoplasia.

  • Cataracts.

  • Mast cell tumor.

  • Dystocia.

  • Atopy.

  • Glaucoma.

  • Patella luxation.

  • Skin fold pyoderma (facial and tail).

  • Cushing’s syndrome (PDH and AT)

  • Chemodectomas.

  • Melanoma.

What you should know:
  • This is an excellent breed for the first time dog owner.

  • It will adapt itself to whatever life style you have.

  • It is small, relatively quiet, long-lived, smart, and short coated.

  • It was at one time the most popular dog in America.  It has been out of vogue for many years, but appears to be making a comeback.

  • The breed is closely associated with the city of Boston and is used as a mascot or symbol of many things in Beantown.

read less

Bloodhound

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Saint Hubert Hound

Country/Date of origin:
  • Belgium / 800′s

  • ...
read more
Other names/Nicknames:
  • Saint Hubert Hound

Country/Date of origin:
  • Belgium / 800′s

Height:
  • Females:  23 to 25 inches

  • Males:  25 to 27 inches

     
Weight:
  • Females:  80 to 100 pounds

  • Males:  90 to 110 pounds

Personality:
  • Contrary to its reputation for fierceness, the Bloodhound is very friendly toward people.

  • Not suitable for city life.

  • Bloodhounds are very active and need everyday exercise.

  • Stubborn and may be hard to train.

History:

An ancient breed whose exact origins are lost in antiquity.  It is known that the Bloodhound was used by hunters in ancient Greece and Rome.  However, it was in Belgium that it was refined to become the ultimate tracking dog.  The name Bloodhound has nothing to do with following a trail of blood, although they can do that.  It referred to the pure blood of the dog, as in blue blood.  Bloodhounds have been exhibited in the United States almost from the beginning of organized dog shows.

Body Type:
  • A very large hound that has a solid, powerful physique.

  • The ears, which are long enough to meet over the nose, are not altered.

  • The hanging ears help to sweep scent into the Bloodhound’s nose as it tracks.

  • Tail is carried gaily over back and is not altered.

  • Loose folds of skin on the head and neck and drooping eyes are necessary for the hallmark mournful expression of the breed.

Coat:
  • Short, smooth, and glossy

  • Allowed colors are black and tan, red and tan, and tawny.

  • Minimal grooming.

Health and Wellness:
  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Elbow dysplasia.

  • Gastric dilatation and volvulus syndrome (GDV, also commonly called bloat).

  • Metabolic bone disease.

What you should know:
  • The Bloodhound is the only dog whose testimony is accepted in a court of law.

  • The most famous man-tracker, Nick Carter, is credited with finding more than 600 criminals.

  • This is not a dog for everybody.  He may be the king of trackers, but to many he is known as the king of slime for his frequent drooling.

  • Known for snoring.

  • The distinctive, deep-baying voice of the Bloodhound can be a problem if you have close neighbors who do not appreciate a midnight serenade.

  • Bloodhounds should never be allowed to run free.  They have absolutely no road sense and are oblivious to cars when they are busy tracking something interesting.

  • Late bloomers.

  • Pups are born black and without wrinkles.

read less

Bichon Frise

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Tenerife Dog

  • Bichon

     
Country/Date of origin:
  • Spain

  • ...
read more
Other names/Nicknames:
  • Tenerife Dog

  • Bichon

     
Country/Date of origin:
  • Spain

  • 1400′s

Height:
  • 9 to 12 inches at shoulder

Weight:
  • 7 to 12 pounds

Personality:
  • Happy.  Happy.  Happy.  This breed is Pollyanna in canine form.

  • The Bichon lives to make you happy, too.

  • Loving and lovable.

  • Requires little exercise, so it is quite suited to apartment living.

  • Intelligent, although sometimes exhibits a stubborn streak.

History:

The history of the Bichon Frise is like that of a mysterious and exotic stranger.  Some claim a Maltese as the foundation stock, others see a dash of Poodle or Barbet.  The truth is the breed is probably a mixture of the best qualities of a lot of little lap dogs.  It is an ancient breed at any rate.  Bichons have been the favored playthings of aristocratic ladies since the Middle Ages.  They spread around the Mediterranean region because sea captains knew well the favors they could buy with one of the little canine charmers.  But as royalty’s fortunes declined, so did that of the Bichon Frise.  However, for a dog that was bred to please, it had other ways to make a living.  It literally joined the circus.  For almost a century the little powder puffs have amused audiences as clown dogs or dancing companions of organ grinders.  They remained popular in France but it wasn’t until the 1950′s that they began to attract an international following again.  The American Kennel Club (AKC) gave them full recognition as a member of the Non-sporting Group in 1973.

Body Type:
  • Small, fluffy dog with a poodle-like appearance.

  • Tail curls over the back and is not altered.

  • Narrow ears hang close to the head and frame the face.  They are never altered.

Coat:
  • An extremely thick, double coat.  Left to its own devices the coat would form short, corkscrew curls.  However, it is usually brushed and trimmed to form a fluffy powder-puff effect.

  • The outercoat is silky and long (two inches or more).

  • The undercoat is soft and short.

  • Hair on the ears and tail is longer than that on the body.

  • Permissible colors are white or white in combination with buff, cream, apricot, or gray.

  • Professional grooming is absolutely required for pets, as well as show dogs.  Plan on once every six weeks.

Health and Wellness:
  • Epiphora.

  • Urolithiasis (oxalate and struvite).

  • Patella luxation.

  • Idiopathic epilepsy.

  • Periodontal disease.

  • Generalized tremor.

  • Mitral insufficiency.

What you should know:
  • The name Bichon Frise means simply little fluffy dog in French.

  • It is pronounced Bee shoan Free say.

  • Bichons were powdered, perfumed, and coifed till Bichon came to mean pamper or make beautiful.

  • Bichons are literally clowns.  They enjoy entertaining people and many of the circus dogs most people think are Poodles are actually Bichons.

  • A high purchase price and monthly professional grooming can make the Bichon an expensive breed to own.

read less

Black Russian Terrier

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Tjorniy Terrier

  • BRT

  • Blackies

     
Country/Date of origin:
  • ...
read more
Other names/Nicknames:
  • Tjorniy Terrier

  • BRT

  • Blackies

     
Country/Date of origin:
  • Russia

  • 20th century

Height:
  • 25 to 30 inches

Weight:
  • 80 to 130 pounds

Personality:
  • Tends to be one-person dog.

  • Intensely loyal.

  • Protective of both family and property.

  • Suspicious towards strangers.

History:

Developed in Russia just after World War II, the Black Russian Terrier was created to fill a need for a large, fearless, utility dog for military and police work.  Base stock was the Giant Schnauzer, Airedale Terrier, Rottweiler, and the Russian Newfoundland or Russian Diver (a cross of Newfoundland with different breeds).  The result was a hardy dog that looks like a stocky version of the Giant Schnauzer but with a more actively protective personality.  The breed originated in the military kennel, Red Star, near Moscow.  For a long time now, St. Petersburg has been the source for quality Blackies.  With the collapse of the Soviet Union, export restrictions relaxed and the Black Russian Terrier, commonly known as the BRT, is finding new friends around the world.

Body Type:
  • A large, well-muscled dog that resembles a stocky, Giant Schnauzer.

  • Dog must be robust, rather massive, and have good bone structure.

  • Ears are natural, of medium size, and hang down from the cartilage with the front edge lying close to the cheek (like the Rottweiler’s).

  • Tail is docked to four or five vertebrae (to be four- to six-inches in the mature dog).

Coat:
  • The double coat is thick and wiry, giving the dog a shaggy, tousled look.

  • Only color accepted is black with a few gray hairs allowed on the back.

  • Any markings, gray or any other color, is a disqualification fault.

  • Grooming is moderate.

Health and Wellness:
  • Hip dysplasia.

What you should know:
  • Becoming very popular in Europe.

  • There are over 300 BRTs registered with the Black Russian Terriers Club of America.

  • Males can be dog-aggressive with large breeds because of the tendency to dominate.

  • They get along with cats and other small pets.

  • Early socialization and obedience training are very important.

  • For a person without experience with working dogs, a female is a better choice.

  • Blackies are very sensitive with owners and must be handled firmly but not roughly.

read less

Birman

Personality:
  • Gentle, quiet, and unobtrusive.

  • Affectionate and people-oriented.

  • ...
read more
Personality:
  • Gentle, quiet, and unobtrusive.

  • Affectionate and people-oriented.

  • Considered a cat of mystery and legend.

History:

Believed to have originated in Burma, where the Birman was considered the sacred cat of the Kittah priests.  A legend states that the Birman’s blue eyes come from a temple goddess and that its white feet (referred to as “gloves”) come from the head priest.  In 1919, a pair of Birmans were shipped from Burma to France.  The male did not survive.  The kittens of the pregnant female became the foundation stock of the Birman breed in France.  At the end of World War II only two Birmans were left alive in Europe, requiring an outcrossing program to re-establish the breed.  Birmans were exported to the United States from France in 1959 and were accepted for championship in the Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA) in 1967.

Body Type:
  • Large, elongated, and stocky.

  • Head is broad and rounded with medium, rounded ears.

  • Eyes are deep blue, round, and set well apart.

Coat:
  • Non-mat, silky coat is medium long to long with a heavy ruff.  With the exception of the white gloves on feet, the Birman is a pointed cat.

  • In CFA, points may be seal, blue, chocolate and lilac.

  • The International Cat Association (TICA) accepts many more colors, including lynx point and tortie point.

  • Body color should be in strong contrast with the points and have a faint, golden-beige cast that is referred to as golden mist.

  • White feet (gloves) are not found in any other breed and cannot be explained by geneticists

Health and Wellness:
  • Neonatal isoerythrolysis.

  • Hip dysplasia.

What you should know:
  • Even though the silky texture of the Birman coat is non-matting, regular grooming will keep your Birman looking its best.

read less

Black and Tan Coonhound

Other names/Nicknames:
  • American Black and Tan Coonhound

  • Treeing Hound

Country/Date...
read more
Other names/Nicknames:
  • American Black and Tan Coonhound

  • Treeing Hound

Country/Date of origin:
  • United States

  • 1700′s

Height:
  • Females:  23 to 25 inches

  • Males:  25 to 27 inches

     
Weight:
  • Females:  55 to 70 pounds

  • Males:  60 to 75 pounds

     
Personality:
  • Very active dogs.

  • Do better in a country setting.

  • Friendly and even tempered.

History:

Generations of breeding have produced this raccoon and possum specialist.  Like the dogs it was created from, the Bloodhound, the Foxhound, and the now extinct Talbot Hound, the Black and Tan Coonhound is a scent trailer and works with his head down.  Coonhounds do not give excessive voice when trailing, but when the quarry is treed, they break into a lusty chorus.  One of the six breeds of American coonhounds, the Black and Tan was recognized by the United Kennel Club (UKC) in 1900 and by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1945.  Most are registered with the UKC, which holds many more field events than the rival AKC.

Body Type:
  • A large, distinctively-marked hound with loose skin.

  • Resembles a lightly built Bloodhound.

  • Large, droopy ears are not altered.

  • Long tail is held upright when the dog is alert.

Coat:
  • Short, smooth, and glossy.

  • Black is the predominant color and must be accompanied by tan patches above the eyes, on the chest, legs, and on the sides of the muzzle.  Should comprise about 10 to 15 percent of the total body area.

Health and Wellness:
  • Generally healthy.

  • Ear cankers typical of breeds with pendulous ears.

  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Progressive retinal atrophy.

  • Blood disorder known as Hemophilia B is sometimes genetically transmitted.

What you should know:
  • Each Coonhound has a distinctive voice, and hunters can recognize their dogs by sound alone as they follow a hunting pack.

  • Puppies are born solid black.  The tan markings develop when the whelps are a few weeks old.

  • Likes to wander off.

  • The hunting urge runs strong in the Black and Tan.

read less

Briard

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Berger De Brie

Country/Date of origin:
  • France

  • 1200′s

...
read more
Other names/Nicknames:
  • Berger De Brie

Country/Date of origin:
  • France

  • 1200′s

Height:
  • Females:  22 to 25-1/2 inches

  • Males:  23 to 27 inches

Weight:
  • 75 to 90 pounds

Personality:
  • Loving and giving to those it knows but aloof and suspicious around strangers.

  • Intelligent and easily trained.

  • An independent spirit.

  • Not looking for constant approval.

  • Views itself as a companion rather than a servant.

History:

The history of the Briard can be traced back to the time of Emperor Charlemagne.  This very old French-shepherd dog can be seen in eighth-century tapestries.  Its great courage and loyalty are mentioned in records from the 12th century on.  The French-shepherd dog, with the springy gait, is both a herder and a flock guardian.  A club of fanciers was formed in France in 1897 and the breed’s fortunes followed the tides of war in the early 20th century.  The introduction of the Briard to the United States is not well documented.  It is thought that the Marquis de Lafayette may have brought some to his friend George Washington.  It is known that it took until 1922 for a United States born litter of Briard puppies to be recorded.

Body Type:
  • A large, powerful dog whose body is slightly longer than high.

  • Ears are set high on the head and are cropped in the United States.

  • The tail is carried low, with a small hook at the end called a crochet.  It is not altered.

  • Double dewclaws are required on each rear leg.

Coat:
  • The shaggy, coarse, double coat is slightly wavy and about four- to six-inches long.

  • Hair falls over the eyes, masking the expression but not the prominent black nose.

  • The outerhairs have a peculiar, dry feel and make a rasping sound between the fingers.

  • Permissible colors are black, various shades of gray, or tawny.

  • Becomes matted and dirty if not brushed at least twice a week.

Health and Wellness:
  • Subject to hip dysplasia.

  • Susceptible to bloat.

  • Progressive retinal atrophy.

What you should know:
  • Briards are homebodies.  Like other herding dogs, they do not tend to roam.

  • The gait of a Briard is supple and springy, like that of a big cat.

  • The dog seems to glide along the ground with no visible means of support.

  • Not a popular breed.

  • Puppies will be difficult to obtain.

read less

Bouvier Des Flandres

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Belgian Cattle Dog

Country/Date of origin:
  • Belgium

  • 1600′s

    ...
read more
Other names/Nicknames:
  • Belgian Cattle Dog

Country/Date of origin:
  • Belgium

  • 1600′s

Height:
  • Females:  23-1/2 to 26-1/2 inches

  • Males:  24-1/2 to 27-1/2 inches

Weight:
  • 75 to 95 pounds

Personality:
  • A natural guardian.

  • Can be aggressive with other dogs.

  • A homebody, this guard dog will not roam from the property.

  • Intelligent and docile.

  • Wary of strangers.

History:

One of Belgium’s native breeds, the Bouvier (which means cowherd) was developed as a butchers’ dog in Belgium.  It pulled the butchers’ cart and herded the cattle to and from the stock pens.  This gentle drover was almost lost in the destruction of  World Wars I and II that swept across its homeland in the 20th century.   The first Bouviers were imported to the United States in the 1930′s, and this kindly, loyal breed has never gotten the popularity it deserves.

Body Type:
  • A large, rough-coated, droving dog that is square in appearance.

  • Has a full beard and mustache, as well as very long eyebrows.

  • Ears are cropped to a triangular point in the United States and are carried erect.

  • Tail is docked to about four-inches in length.

Coat:
  • Tousled, with a crisp top coat and thick, protective undercoat that provides a waterproof covering.

  • Length should be kept at about two-inches overall.

  • Colors may be fawn to black, including brindle, gray, and salt-and-pepper.

  • A small white star on the chest is acceptable but any more white than that is heavily penalized, as are chocolate or parti-colors.

  • Unlike most breeds, the Bouvier does not have a shiny coat.  The hair has a dull, matte finish.

  • Moderate grooming required.

Health and Wellness:
  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Autoimmune thyroid disease.

  • Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD).

  • Laryngeal paralysis.

  • Metabolic bone disease.

  • Lymphoma.

  • Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC, digit).

What you should know:
  • Intelligent and trainable, the Bouvier is often used as a guide dog for the blind or as a police dog.

  • Relative scarcity of the breed may make it hard to find a puppy.

read less

Boxer

Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Germany

  • Late 1800′s

...
read more
Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Germany

  • Late 1800′s

Height:
  • Females: 21-1/2 to 23-1/2 inches

  • Males:  23 to 25 inches

     
Weight:
  • Females:  55 to 65 pounds

  • Males:  60 to 70 pounds

     
Personality:
  • Highly intelligent and willing to please.

  • Loyal and affectionate to family.

  • Suspicious of strangers.

  • May be too possessive.

History:

This is a breed whose exact beginnings are known.  In the 1880′s, George Alt, who lived near Munich, created a new working dog by crossing a Bullenbeisser (a mastiff type dog that is now extinct) with an English Bulldog.  The first dog to be considered a Boxer was a second generation of that mixture.  The breed is one that combines power and agility.  There is also a good head on the Boxer’s working shoulders.  It is so suited to doing man’s bidding that it has been a favorite of police departments, military trainers, and guide dog organizations.  Boxers in the United States are lighter and more refined than those in Europe.  The first Boxer was registered by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1904, but the first champion didn’t finish until 1915.  Boxers have had a slow and steady climb in popularity.  They are now firmly fixed in the top-twenty breeds.

Body Type:
  • Strong, muscular, athletic build.

  • Has an undershot jaw and an upward-tipped muzzle.

  • Ears are usually docked in the United States and are carried erect.

  • Docked tail is carried high.

Coat:
  • Smooth, shiny, and short.

  • Colors allowed are brindle or fawn, generally with white markings and a darker face or mask.

  • An all white dog is disqualified in the show ring.

  • Minimal grooming required.

Health and Wellness:
  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Autoimmune thyroid disease.

  • Gastric dilatation and volvulus syndrome (GDV, also commonly called bloat).

  • Calcinosis circumscripta.

  • Subaortic stenosis.

  • Pulmonic stenosis.

  • Cryptorchidism.

  • Histiocytomas.

  • Congenital deafness.

  • Metabolic bone disease.

  • Lymphoma.

  • Mast cell tumor.

  • Boxer cardiomyopathy.

  • Granulomatous colitis.

  • Idiopathic colitis.

  • Idiopathic epilepsy.

  • Atopy.

  • Food allergy.

  • Demodicosis.

  • Ulcerative keratitis.

  • Follicular dysplasia.

  • Muzzle pyoderma.

  • Steroid-responsive meningitis.

  • Cushing’s syndrome (PDH and AT).

  • Epulis.

  • Neoplasia (Glial cell tumors, thyroid tumors, osteosarcoma, aortic body tumoris, testicular tumors).

  • Cauda equina syndrome.

What you should know:
  • Snores up a storm.  A condition shared by almost all the short faced breeds.

  • Very popular.

  • Because of ear cropping and tail docking, this breed is usually costly to purchase.

  • Long lived.

  • A good family dog.

read less

Bracco Italiano

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Italian Pointer

Country/Date of origin:
  • Italy

  • 1700′s

...
read more
Other names/Nicknames:
  • Italian Pointer

Country/Date of origin:
  • Italy

  • 1700′s

Height:
  • 22 to 26 inches

Weight:
  • 55 to 88 pounds

Personality:
  • Tends to be stubborn.

  • Responsive to its owner and loyal.

  • Very energetic.

History:

The Bracco Italiano is thought to originate from crosses made to the sighthounds brought to Italy by the Phoenician traders from Egypt.  It is the ancestor of all European pointers.  Referred to by its admirers as noble, this was a popular hunting dog during the Renaissance and was often given as a gift from Italian government officials to VIP’s in other countries such as France and Spain.  It accompanied net hunters of the Middle Ages, and later it was teamed up with falconers who used it to flush the falcon’s quarry.  Its popularity declined during the 1800′s and it is now undergoing a revival in popularity in its homeland.  It remains almost unknown in the United States.

Body Type:
  • Resembles other pointer breeds in overall appearance.

  • The tail is always docked.

  • The hanging ears are set low and are long enough to reach the nose.  They are not altered.

  • Muzzle is unusually square for a pointer.

Coat:
  • The coat is smooth and short.

  • Acceptable colors are white; white with orange, amber, or brown markings; white flecked with orange or brown; and, roan.

  • Minimal grooming required.

Health and Wellness:
  • Sensitive ears require attention.

  • Possible hip dysplasia.

What you should know:
  • Best suited to outdoor living.

  • When hunting, it searches with a long, elastic, striding trot with its nose high in the wind.  However, it stands and points in traditional fashion.

  • Has changed little over the centuries.

  • Will be difficult to find a puppy in the United States.

read less

Braque Saint Germain

Other names/Nicknames:
  • St. Germain Pointer

Country/Date of origin:
  • France

  • 1700′s

    ...
read more
Other names/Nicknames:
  • St. Germain Pointer

Country/Date of origin:
  • France

  • 1700′s

Height:
  • 20 to 24 inches

Weight:
  • 40 to 57 pounds

Personality:
  • Rather reserved with strangers.

  • Obedient and loyal to its owner.

  • Not noisy, but rather quiet and gentle.

  • A willing worker.

History:

This breed is said to have been created when King Charles X of France crossed an orange and white English Pointer that he received as a gift with a Braque Francais.  This laid the foundation of the breed.  Used for hunting large game, it was concentrated for a long time in the area around St. Germain, which gave it its name.  It is a rare breed even in its own country.

Body Type:
  • Resembles the English Pointer, although rather leggy.

  • The long tail is carried horizontally and is not altered.

  • The hanging ears are set at eye level and are not altered.

  • Nose is pink and the eyes are yellow in keeping with the coat colors.

Coat:
  • Short, fine, thick, and glossy.

  • The color is always white with a few bright orange patches.

  • Does not provide sufficient insulation when wet, so the dog is not used for water retrieving.

  • Minimal grooming required.

Health and Wellness:
  • Generally very healthy.

  • May be subject to hip dysplasia.

What you should know:
  • A fine dog for hunting small game, but it is not a good choice for retrieving from the water.

  • Makes a good companion dog for the family.

  • Will be extremely difficult to find a puppy in the United States.

read less

FIND US

Texas West Animal Health

16367 South FM 4,

Santo, TX 76472

Phone. 940-769-2222

Fax. 866-632-3365

Email. texaswestvet@gmail.com