BREED INFORMATION

Chihuahua (Smooth)

Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Mexico

  • 1800′s

Height:
  • 6...

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Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Mexico

  • 1800′s

Height:
  • 6 to 9 inches

Weight:
  • 2 to 6 pounds

Personality:
  • The ultimate lap dog.

  • Bred to be a charming companion, the Chihuahua is extremely affectionate toward those it considers family.

  • Reserved with strangers.

  • Temperamental.

  • Easily trained for the most part.

  • Difficult to housebreak.

History:

The origins of the Chihuahua are not known.  The modern dog was, however, discovered in Mexico’s Chihuahua state in 1850.  Most of today’s dogs are descended from the original 50 taken to the United States.  Evidence in stone carvings of the Toltec people firmly establishes the Chihuahua was in Mexico in the ninth or tenth century.  Written records also indicate the dog was important in the religious and mythological life of the later Aztecs.  Chihuahuas may be longhaired or smooth-coated. The smooth-coat is considered to be the original variety.  The longhaired dogs were created in the early 20th century, possibly by crossing with longhaired toy breeds such as the Papillon and Pomeranian.

Body Type:
  • A sturdy breed but exceedingly tiny.

  • Anything over six pounds is disqualified.

  • Erect, wide-set ears are not altered.

  • Gently curved tail (called a sickle tail) held erect but not over back is not altered.

Coat:
  • In the smooth-coated variety, the hair is short, soft, and glossy.  The hair is longer around the neck creating a ruff.

  • All colors and combinations of colors are allowed.

  • Mexican fanciers favor a jet black dog with tan markings, or a black and white spotted one.

  • Solid color dogs are preferred in the United States.

  • Minimal grooming.

Health and Wellness:
  • Pulmonic stenosis.

  • Patent ductus arteriosis.

  • Juvenile hypoglycemia.

  • Hydrocephalus.

  • Cryptorchidism.

  • Patellar luxation.

  • Atlantoaxial subluxation.

  • Collapsing trachea.

  • Demodicosis.

  • Cushing’s disease (PDH).

  • Mitral insufficiency.

What you should know:
  • According to the Guinness Book of Records, the Chihuahua is the smallest breed of dog.  One full-grown specimen weighed in at ten ounces.

  • Sensitive to cold, Chihuahuas shiver a lot.  They also shake when excited or nervous.

  • Low exercise requirements make them ideal for apartments and older people.

  • Long-lived breed.

  • High-pitched bark. They will keep up an alarm until you investigate, making them an excellent alarm system.

  • Chihuahuas recognize and prefer their own kind.  However, they get along beautifully with other breeds of dogs if properly introduced or raised together.

  • Majority are wonderful with cats.

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Chinese Crested (Powderpuff)

Other names/Nicknames:

  • Chinese Powderpuff

Country/Date of origin:

  • China

  • Han...

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Other names/Nicknames:

  • Chinese Powderpuff

Country/Date of origin:

  • China

  • Han dynasty 100 BC

Height:

  • 9 to 13 inches at shoulder

Weight:

  • 5 to 12 pounds

Personality:

  • Affectionate with family but suspicious of strangers.

  • Does not like to be handled.

  • Active and alert.

  • Rather delicate.

History:

It is widely accepted that hairless dogs are spontaneous, genetic mutations.  They have been reported all over the world but for some reason they are more often found in Central and South America.  The Crested dogs are recorded in China 2,000 years ago but it was in Central America that they were fostered, keeping the breed alive when it fell out of favor in its native land.  The Chinese Crested is found in two varieties—Hairless and Powderpuff—and both types can be found in the same litter.  The main difference between the two varieties is the hair coat, of course, but the Powderpuffs can also have a drop ear, which is not permitted in the Hairless variety.  The Powderpuffs are not subject to as many genetic defects as their Hairless siblings and need to be retained in the breeding pool to maintain the health of the Hairless Cresteds.  A breed club was formed in 1975, and the Chinese Cresteds were accepted for registration in the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1992.

Body Type:

  • A small, dainty dog with a soft veil of long, silky hair.

  • Long tail, held low, is not altered

  • Heavily-fringed ears may be either erect or dropped.

  • The feet of the Chinese Crested are extraordinarily long.  They are so exaggerated in shape that it can appear that they have an extra joint.

Coat:

  • The Powderpuff variety has a long, silky coat.

  • It can be any color or combination of colors.

  • Moderate grooming.

  • The hair tangles easily.

Health and Wellness:

  • Generally healthy.

  • Problems with teeth and bad breath.

What you should know:

  • One of the early supporters of this breed was Gypsy Rose Lee.  She, however, favored the Hairless variety.

  • A Chinese Crested in motion reminds one of a prancing pony.

  • The gait is fluid, with great reach and drive.  Surprisingly vigorous in a Toy dog.

  • Hairless and Powderpuffs are often born in the same litter.  Legend has it that the hairy pups are to keep their hairless siblings warm.

  • Long-lived.

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Chinese Crested (Hairless)

Other names/Nicknames:

  • Chinese Hairless

Country/Date of origin:

  • China

  • Han dynasty ...

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Other names/Nicknames:

  • Chinese Hairless

Country/Date of origin:

  • China

  • Han dynasty 100 BC

Height:

  • 9 to 13 inches at shoulder

Weight:

  • 5 to 12 pounds

Personality:

  • Affectionate with family but suspicious of strangers.

  • Does not like to be handled.

  • Active and alert.

  • Rather delicate.

History:

It is widely accepted that hairless dogs are spontaneous genetic mutations.  They have been reported all over the world but for some reason they are more often found in Central and South America.  The Crested dogs are recorded in China 2,000 years ago but it was in Central America that they were fostered, keeping the breed alive when it fell out of favor in its native land.  The Chinese Crested is found in two varieties—Hairless and Powderpuff—and both types can be found in the same litter.  A breed club was formed in 1975, and the Chinese Cresteds were accepted for registration in the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1992.

Body Type:

  • A small dog that brings to mind a little pony.

  • Long tail, held low, is not altered.

  • Erect ears are not altered.

  • Fringing is optional.

  • The feet of the Chinese Crested are extraordinarily long.  They are so exaggerated in shape that it can appear that they have an extra joint.

Coat:

  • The Hairless variety has hair only on the head, feet and tail tip.  It can be any color.

  • The texture of the skin of the Hairless should be smooth and fine grained.  It is warm to the touch, although it is the same temperature as haired dogs.

  • Skin can be as colorful as the hair coats:  blue, pink, lilac, golden, spotted, or the same shade as the hair.

  • Color of the skin is variable.  It darkens (tans) in the summer and is lighter in the winter.

Health and Wellness:

  • Missing teeth are a problem that seems to be connected to the hairless gene.

  • Toenails are sometimes missing in the Hairless variety.

  • Hairless variety can get severe acne.

  • Will sunburn if not protected with suntan lotions.

What you should know:

  • One of the early supporters of Hairless variety was Gypsy Rose Lee.

  • A Chinese Crested in motion reminds one of a prancing pony.  It certainly looks like one with its mane and hairy tail

  • Cresteds and Powderpuffs are often born in the same litter.  Legend has it that the hairy pups are to keep their hairless siblings warm.

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Chinese Shar Pei

Other names/Nicknames:
  • The Wrinkly Dog

Country/Date of origin:
  • China

  • 1500′s

...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • The Wrinkly Dog

Country/Date of origin:
  • China

  • 1500′s

Height:
  • 18 to 20 inches

Weight:
  • 45 to 60 pounds

Personality:
  • The Shar Pei has an oriental nature.

  • It is regal and aloof.

  • This dog does not fawn and beg for attention.

  • A good watchdog.

History:

The Shar Pei is an ancient Chinese fighting dog.  In 1978, it was called the rarest breed in the world.  Now, it seems about to break the records for a comeback.  From a handful of the wrinkled warriors that remained in Hong Kong, the breed has spread around the world.  In 1988, when the Shar Pei was accepted into the American Kennel Club (AKC) Miscellaneous class, there were almost thirty-thousand dogs registered in the United States alone.  In 1992, it was given full membership in the AKC and it has already hit the top twenty breeds in popularity.

Body Type:
  • Known for the folds of loose skin covering its body, especially its head, which gives it a permanent frown.

  • The high-set, thick tail curls over the back, or to either side of the back, and is not altered.

  • The small, folded ears are never altered.

Coat:
  • Two types of coat are found in this breed.  The horse coat is short.  The brush coat is harsh and about one-inch long.

  • Permissible colors are solid cream, fawn, red, black, and chocolate.

  • In a twist, the Shar Pei has more wrinkles when it is a baby than when it is older.  However, there must be wrinkles at all ages.

  • A great deal of care must be taken to ensure that the folds are kept free of fungal or bacterial infections.

Health and Wellness:
  • Cutaneous mucinosis.

  • Demodicosis.

  • Ectropion.

  • Entropion.

  • Skin fold pyoderma.

  • Folliculitis.

  • Glaucoma.

  • Immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency.

  • Patella luxation.

  • Elbow dysplasia.

  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Upper airway obstruction.

  • Hiatal hernia.

  • Megaesophagus.

  • Ciliary dyskinesia.

  • Shar Pei fever.

  • Renal amyloidosis.

  • Atopy.

  • Food allergy.

  • Hypothyroidism.

  • Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

  • Otitis externa.

  • Mast cell tumor.

What you should know:
  • Shar Pei means sandy coat and it refers to the gritty feel of the stiff, bristly hair.

  • The tongue is always blue-black, a characteristic found in only two other breeds—the Chow Chow and Thai Ridgeback—indicating that perhaps these three are closely related.

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Chow Chow (Rough)

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Chow

Country/Date of origin:
  • China

  • First century
...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Chow

Country/Date of origin:
  • China

  • First century
Height:
  • 18 to 22 inches

Weight:
  • 45 to 70 pounds

Personality:
  • It may look cuddly, but the Chow is not a breed to toy with.  It demands respect.

  • They are one-person dogs.

  • Unpredictable with other animals.  Will attack for no apparent reason

  • Very stubborn.

  • A natural guard.

History:

One of the oldest recognizable breeds of dogs.  The Chow Chow is readily identifiable in northeast Asian artifacts that date before Christ.  The original purpose of this large member of the Spitz family was as a hunting dog.  A seventh century emperor of China is said to have kept over 4.000 Chows in his sporting kennel.  The breed gradually became more commonly used as a guard dog in temples.  It was attributed with mystical, supernatural powers and its terrifying warrior scowl was thought to scare off evil spirits.  No doubt the scowl and the Chow’s willingness to back it up with action worked quite well on humans with evil intentions, too.  The first Chows left the Orient in the 1880′s bound for England.  From there, they made it across the Atlantic in less than 10 years.  This breed is firmly in the top twenty most popular breeds in the American Kennel Club (AKC).

Body Type:
  • Massive, compact body with a distinctive lion-like ruff around the head, unusual blue-black tongue, and a frowning expression.

  • The tail is set high and curved over the back.  It is never altered.

  • Small, erect ears blend into the ruff and are never altered.

  • A stilted gait with a short stride is a unique characteristic of the Chow Chow.

Coat:
  • Dense, brush-like, double coat is made up of a coarse outer coat and a soft, woolly undercoat.

  • Permissible colors are solid black, red, blue, fawn, or cream.

  • Sheds heavily in the summer.

  • Significant grooming is necessary to prevent matting.

Health and Wellness:
  • Elbow dysplasia.

  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Pulmonic stenosis.

  • Entropion.

  • Renal dysplasia.

  • Hypothyroidism.

  • Uveodermatologic syndrome.

  • Pemphigus foliaceus.

  • Idiopathic epilepsy.

  • Alopecia X.

  • Demodicosis.

  • Glaucoma.

  • Melanoma (oral).

What you should know:
  • The Chow Chow got its name from English sailors who referred to it by the term the Chinese gave to miscellaneous cargo or bric-a-brac.

  • Chinese, at one time, used the Chow Chow for food and utilized the pelts for clothing.  This is still a common practice among nomadic tribesmen in the Arctic regions, where the Chow Chow is thought to have originated.

  • A blue tongue is a breed hallmark.  It is not unique among dogs, however.  The Shar Pei, for instance, also has a blue tongue.

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Cornish Rex

Personality:
  • Devoted, active, and highly intelligent.

  • Loving companions for people...

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Personality:
  • Devoted, active, and highly intelligent.

  • Loving companions for people and dogs.

  • Known to be excellent jumpers.

  • Enjoy grooming their human companions.

History:

In 1950, a curly-coated, cream-colored kitten was born in a litter of otherwise normal-coated barn cats in Cornwall, England.  The owner of the litter, assumed the coat was the result of a spontaneous mutation and worked to develop a breed with the characteristic coat.  The term rex is a genetic term that refers to a lack of guard hairs, or top coat, leaving only the soft curly undercoat.  Accepted for championship status in all breed associations.

Body Type:
  • Small- to medium-sized with a long, slender torso.

  • Head is small and narrow with a roman nose and large, full, alert ears.

  • Eyes are medium to large with color corresponding to coat color.

Coat:
  • Coat is short, extremely soft, and made up completely of undercoat that forms a tight, uniform, marcel wave from head to tail.

  • Coat sheds very little.

  • Wide assortment of colors including white, black, red, cream, chinchilla, smoke, tabby patterns, calico, and bi-color.

Health and Wellness:
  • As with all breeds that are developed from spontaneous mutations, there can be problems with weakened immune systems in cats that come from heavily inbred lines.

What you should know:
  • These cats enjoy perching in the highest spot in the house.

  • These cats may not cause allergies in allergy sufferers.

  • Because of their minimal coat, these cats like warmth and can suffer from cold temperatures.

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Deutsch Bracke

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Olpe Hound

  • German Foxhound

Country/Date of origin:
  • ...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Olpe Hound

  • German Foxhound

Country/Date of origin:
  • Germany

  • 19th century

Height:
  • 16 to 21 inches

Weight:
  • 35 to 40 pounds

Personality:
  • Affectionate and friendly.

  • Difficult to train.

  • Not very intelligent.

  • Bred for hunting skills.

History:

The Deutsch Bracke is an efficient tracking dog of the Foxhound family.  Developed in Germany, they have the same colors and markings of the usual hound and are used for the same purposes.  At the turn of the 20th century there were several breeds of pack hounds in Germany, but with the exception of the Deutsche Bracke, they are all virtually extinct.  In 1955, a standard was drawn up in Olpe, Germany to fix the type for show purposes.  Because of this, the breed is sometimes known as the Olpe Hound.  Small for a Foxhound, the Bracke is closer in size to the English Harrier.  He is closely related to the Stovare group of scent hounds in Scandinavia.

Body Type:
  • Ears are low set and very long.  They are not altered.

  • Tail is thin and quite long.  It is not altered.

Coat:
  • Short hair is smooth and glossy.

  • Marked in the traditional tricolor of the Foxhound (black, brown, and white).

  • Low grooming requirements.

Health and Wellness:
  • Generally healthy.

  • Hip dysplasia.

What you should know:
  • A pack hound, the Deutsche Bracke has a melodious voice like its Foxhound brethren.

  • Most Deutsche Bracke are still in the hands of masters of Foxhounds and used in their traditional vocation.

  • Not suitable as a house pet.  This is an outdoor dog.

  • Finding a puppy to purchase will be difficult.

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Curly Coated Retriever

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Gamekeeper’s Dog

Country/Date of origin:
  • England

  • 1800′s

...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Gamekeeper’s Dog

Country/Date of origin:
  • England

  • 1800′s

Height:
  • Females:  23 to 25 inches

  • Males:  25 to 27 inches

     
Weight:
  • 70 to 80 pounds

Personality:
  • Devoted and loving to family but aloof with strangers.

  • Makes a better watchdog than most sporting breeds.

  • Intelligent but stubborn.

  • Does not get along well with other dogs.

History:

A water retriever with a coat to do the job.  The Curly-Coated Retriever is an old breed probably created with a dash of Irish Water Spaniel, Poodle and possibly a bit of Newfoundland.  The Curly Coat first appeared in the show ring in England in 1860, and was being shown in the United States by 1907.  Although never very popular in America, it is the water dog of choice in Australia and New Zealand.

Body Type:
  • A large, strongly-built, sporting dog with a distinctive curly coat.

  • Hanging ears are not altered.

  • Tail is not altered.

Coat:
  • Body and tail are covered with tight ringlets.

  • In contrast the face is distinctively smooth.

  • Solid black or solid liver are allowed colors.

  • Surprisingly low maintenance grooming.

Health and Wellness:
  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Follicular dysplasia.

  • Frequent seborrhea skin irritations, especially when kept indoors.

What you should know:
  • Not common anywhere in the United States. Finding a puppy may take considerable time and effort.

  • Becomes hyperactive and cranky if not allowed ample exercise.

  • Don’t expect to be able to walk past any body of water without the Curly Coat checking it out.

  • Most Curly-Coated Retrievers are dual purpose, being actively used for both hunting and show.

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Cymric (Longhaired Manx)

Personality:
  • Intelligent and playful without being high strung.

  • Retain kitten like...

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Personality:
  • Intelligent and playful without being high strung.

  • Retain kitten like personality into adulthood.

  • Tend to be one-person only cats.

  • Reserved around strangers.

History:

The Cymric (kim-rick) is a longhaired mutation resulting from purebred Manx parents.  Although longhaired Manx have always appeared in Manx litters, it was only recently that breeders have attempted to have them recognized as a separate breed or breed division.  The International Cat Association (TICA) considers Cymrics as a separate breed from Manx.  In the Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA), Cymrics are referred to as Longhaired Manx, a division of the Manx.  Recognized for championship status in all breed associations.

Body Type:
  • Medium, stout, and compact with sturdy bone structure.

  • Rump is extremely broad and round with no tail, or only a partial tail.

  • Head is round with prominent cheeks and wide, rounded ears.

  • Eyes are large, round and conform to coat color.

Coat:
  • Silky, double coat is dense, medium long, and forms a ruff around the neck.

  • Colors include solids, tabbies, and parti-colors.

Health and Wellness:
  • The gene that causes a shortened or absent tail may also cause spinal problems, weak hindquarters, colon defects and urinary tract defects.

  • Kitten buyers should look for kittens that move freely (without a hop), stand easily on all four feet, and that have clean, dry, hindquarters.

  • Fecal incontinence.

What you should know:
  • Hindquarters are higher than fore.

  • Rumpies, entirely tailless and often with a dimple where the tail would have been, are most prized in the show ring.

  • Rumpie-risers have one to three tail vertebrae and are allowable in the ring as long as the vertebrae do not stop the judge’s hand stroking down the rump.

  • Stumpies have a short tail stump.

  • Longies have a tail almost as long as the average cat.

  • Although only the tailless Cymrics are accepted for championship, littermates may be of any tail length.

  • All true Manx and Cymrics can trace their pedigrees back to the Isle of Man.  Only real difference from the Manx is the longer coat length.

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Dachschund (Longhaired)

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Teckel

  • Doxie

     
Country/Date of origin:
  • Germany

  • 18th...

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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Teckel

  • Doxie

     
Country/Date of origin:
  • Germany

  • 18th century

Height:
  • Miniatures:  5 to 6 inches

  • Standards:  6 to 10 inches

Weight:
  • Miniatures:  under 11 pounds

  • Standards:  10 to 20 pounds (larger animals are not disqualified)

Personality:
  • A happy, fun-loving personality has made this breed immensely popular all over the world.

  • Gets along well with other pets.

  • Likes to play.

  • Each of the three coat varieties has a slightly different personality.  The longhaired is more prissy than the other two.

History:

Made in Germany, the Dachshund was most likely bred from the same ancestors as the Basset.  The six different types of Dachshunds reflect the various animals that it was used to hunt.  The larger, smooth-haired dogs went to ground after badger and fox.  The smaller smooths went to ground in the smaller den tunnels of weasels and rabbits.  The long and wire haired varieties were better able to tear through brambles and thickets than their smooth-coated relatives.  The breed has been popular in the United States for over a hundred years.  It is one of the foundation breeds of the American Kennel Club (AKC).

Body Type:
  • A long, low dog with short, bent forelegs.

  • Designed to go to ground after badger and fox.

  • Long tail is carried straight out behind and is not altered.

  • Hanging ears are long and well covered with hair.  They are not altered.

Coat:
  • Coat on the longhaired variety is silky and softly waving.

  • Hair is longer on the ears, behind the legs, and under the neck.  The longest hair is on the underside of the tail.

  • Allowed colors are: single color—red or black (although not desirable) and red sable; two colored—black, chocolate, gray, and white each with tan markings.

  • The most common is the black-and-tan, and dappled—a clear brownish or grayish color with dark irregular patches of dark gray, brown or black (no color should dominate).

  • Moderate grooming requirements.

Health and Wellness:
  • Gastric dilatation and volvulus syndrome (GDV, also commonly called bloat)

  • von Willebrand’s disease.

  • Portosystemic shunts.

  • Pattern baldness.

  • Acanthosis nigricans.

  • Microphthalmia.

  • Cryptorchidism.

  • Acquired hypogammaglobulinemia.

  • Congenital deafness.

  • Juvenile cellulitis.

  • Hypothyroidism.

  • Mast cell tumor.

  • Diabetes mellitus.

  • Intervertebral disc disease.

  • Urolithiasis (cystine).

  • Keratoconjunctivitis sicca.

  • Ear margin dermatosis.

  • Pemphigus foliaceus.

  • Sudden acquired retinal degeneration.

  • Cushing’s syndrome (PDH) and AT)

  • Mitral insufficiency.

  • Squamous cell carcinoma (digit).

  • Lipoma.

What you should know:
  • Dachshunds do not have a strong doggy odor and adapt well to city life.

  • Dachs means badger in German, and the dog got its name from the animal it was bred to hunt.

  • A cheerful companion.

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Clumber Spaniel

Other names/Nicknames:

  • None

Country/Date of origin:

  • England

  • 1800′s

Height:

  • ...
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Other names/Nicknames:

  • None

Country/Date of origin:

  • England

  • 1800′s

Height:

  • Females:  17 to 19 inches

  • Males:  18 to 20 inches

Weight:

  • Females:  55 to 70 pounds

  • Males:  70 to 85 pounds

Personality:

  • Gentle and easy going.

  • Learns slowly and requires constant reinforcement.

History:

The Clumber Spaniel is named after a place, Clumber Park, which was the estate of the Duke of Newcastle.  The foundation stock, it is said, was given to one of the English dukes in the mid-18th century by a French duke.  The heavyset retriever became the favorite of several British kings who tended to be heavyset themselves.  They couldn’t keep up with faster Cocker, Springer, and Field Spaniels,  but the steady plodding Clumber suited them fine.  Recognized in England in 1859, the Clumber was registered in the United States in 1883.  It has never been the spaniel of choice for American hunters who favor a bustling, faster-moving bird finder.

Body Type:

  • A bulky spaniel with slow movements and a gentle expression.

  • Hanging ears are not altered.

  • Short tail which is held level with the back is docked.

Coat:

  • Straight, silky, and very abundant coat

  • Color is always white.

  • Orange or lemon markings are permissible on the head but the fewer markings on the body, the better.

Health and Wellness:

  • Hip dysplasia

What you should know:

  • Runs to fat if not given daily exercise.

  • Tends to be a one-person dog.

  • Clumbers don’t do anything quickly.  They lumber.

  • Not common and a puppy may be hard to locate.

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Colorpoint Shorthair

Personality:
  • Fervent desire to be loved.

  • Active, inquisitive, intelligent, and ...

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Personality:
  • Fervent desire to be loved.

  • Active, inquisitive, intelligent, and vocal.

History:

In the late 1940′s, breeders crossed Siamese cats with American Shorthairs, British Shorthairs and Abyssinians in order to create a cat of Siamese type while adding to the spectrum of point colors.  Siamese purists in the Cat Fanciers’ Asscociation (CFA) blocked the acceptance of the new colors for registry as Siamese cats and insisted that they be considered as a separate breed.  In The International Cat Association (TICA), cats with the new colors are still considered as Siamese.  There is no Colorpoint Shorthair breed in their association.  Accepted for championship as an individual breed by CFA in 1974.

Body Type:
  • Medium-sized, refined, and svelte with long tapering lines.

  • Head is a long, tapering wedge with large pointed ears.

  • Blue eyes are a medium almond shape.

Coat:
  • Coat is short, fine, and glossy.

  • Colors on points include red, cream, seal-lynx, chocolate-lynx, blue-lynx, lilac-lynx, red-lynx, seal tortie, chocolate-tortie, blue-cream, lilac-cream, seal tortie-lynx, chocolate tortie-lynx, blue-cream lynx, lilac-cream lynx and cream lynx.

  • Paler body coat with contrasting points on face, ears, legs and tail.

  • Some colors exhibit thumbprint marks on backs of ears.

  • CFA restrictions prohibit Colorpoints born with the four traditional Siamese color points (seal, blue, chocolate and lilac) from being shown. This situation does not exist in TICA and other breed associations.

  • Kittens are born white, developing colorpoints when they are a week to 10 days old.

Health and Wellness:
  • Since Colorpoint Shorthairs are hybrids with Siamese in their pedigree, they sometimes have kinked tails and/or crossed eyes. These defects do not affect the well being of the cat, but are grounds for disqualification in the show ring.

  • Some lines have had occasional problems with cardiomyopathy, a defect of the heart muscle that can lead to heart failure.

  • Gingivitis occasionally is a problem in some lines. Preventive dental care and early treatment can minimize this condition.

What you should know:
  • Colorpoint Shorthairs want to be with you, on you, and involved with everything you do.

  • They get their feelings hurt when you don’t let them help you with all of your activities.

  • If you want a cat that is independent, the Colorpoint is not for you.

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Cocker Spaniel

Other names/Nicknames:

  • None

Country/Date of origin:

  • United States
  • ...
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Other names/Nicknames:

  • None

Country/Date of origin:

  • United States
  • 1800′s

Height:

  • 14 to 15 inches

Weight:

  • 24 to 28 pounds

Personality:

  • Generally even-tempered.
  • Affectionate and gentle.
  • Not particularly intelligent but a willingness to please makes up for it.
  • Can be a problem barker.

History:

This breed was bred from the English Cocker Spaniels that were brought to the United States in the 17th century.  It was recognized as a separate breed in 1946.  Used by hunters to flush out game, it specialized in retrieving quail instead of the woodcock so prevalent in England.  Today, it has become more of a pet and show dog, with an exaggerated coat that would not be suitable in the field.  It reached a peak in popularity between 1940-1956 when it set an American Kennel Club (AKC) record for the number of dogs registered.  It has remained a popular family pet and show dog.

Body Type:

  • Smallest of the sporting dogs.
  • It is known for its distinctive, domed head and large, round, expressive eyes.
  • The docked tail is carried on a line with the topline of the back.
  • The long, hanging, low-set ears are never altered.

Coat:

  • The lavish, medium-length coat is silky in texture.  It can be flat or slightly wavy.
  • There are three acceptable color classifications: black; any other solid color other than black (called ASCOB by show people); and parti-color, which consists of two or more definite colors appearing in clearly defined markings.
  • Needs a moderate amount of grooming, with occasional professional trimming.
  • Hair tends to mat.
  • Seasonal shedding.

Health and Wellness:

  • Autoimmune thyroid disease.
  • Factor X deficiency.
  • Phosphofructokinase deficiency.
  • Hereditary nephritis.
  • Congenital deafness.
  • Platelet dysfunction (storage pool deficiency).
  • Urolithiasis (struvite).
  • Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA).
  • Immune mediated thrombocytopenia (IMT).
  • Glaucoma.
  • Intervertebral disc disease (IVDD).
  • Atopy.
  • Food allergy.
  • Primary seborrhea.
  • Otitis externa.
  • Chronic hepatitis.
  • Cardiomyopathy (taurine responsive).
  • Progressive retinal atrophy.
  • Cushing’s syndrome (PDH and AT).
  • Skin tumors.
  • Keratoconjunctivitis sicca.
  • Oral cavity neoplasia.
  • Circumanal neoplasia.
  • Sebaceous adenomas.
  • Hyperplasia.

What you should know:

  • Easily obtained at reasonable prices.
  • Because of past problems with health and temperament, buy only from a reputable breeder.
  • Tends to become overweight if not kept active.
  • May be difficult to housebreak.
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Collie (Rough)

Other names/Nicknames:

  • Lassie Dog

  • Scotch Collie

Country/Date of ...

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Other names/Nicknames:

  • Lassie Dog

  • Scotch Collie

Country/Date of origin:

  • Great Britain

  • 1500′s

Height:

  • Females:  22 to 24 inches

  • Males:  24 to 26 inches

Weight:

  • Females:  50 to 65 pounds

  • Males:  60 to 75 pounds

Personality:

  • Collies exhibit the qualities of loyalty , intelligence, and gentleness that are the stuff of hero dogs.

  • Easy to train.

  • A desire to please is hard-wired in the Collie’s genetic makeup.

  • They are a noisy breed.  Many owners, as a last resort, cut the vocal cords of compulsive barkers.

History:

An ancient breed of herding dog, the Rough Collie shares a common heritage with the Border Collie.  In the 1860′s, the Rough Collie caught the eye of people interested in the beauty of the dog and bred it to increase body size and the thickness of its coat.  The bigger, slower Rough Collie was able to compete for the shepherd’s favor with the increased popularity of the larger, slower English sheep (more wool), and it began to find its way back into the fields.  With the patronage of Queen Victoria, the Collie became the vogue in the 1880′s.   American royalty, in the form of J. P. Morgan, championed the breed across the Atlantic as well.  In 1885, Collies were admitted into the American Kennel Club (AKC) and great specimens were fetching more than the average man earned in 10 years.  There are two varieties of the Collie.  Everything that can be said about the rough-coated Collie can be said about the smooth variety except for coat.

Body Type:

  • The Collie is recognizable by almost everyone.

  • Considered to be one of the most beautiful of dogs, it has a long, lean head and a muscular body with a deep chest.

  • The tail is long and carried low.  It is never altered.

  • The ears are wedge shaped and should fold forward at the tips.  They are never altered.

Coat:

  • Straight, harsh, outer coat and a full, soft undercoat.

  • Has a profuse ruff around the neck.

  • Four colors are allowed:  sable and white, tricolor (black with white and tan markings), blue merle, and white (which is predominantly white with colored patches.)

  • The standard says no color is to be preferred, but in reality judges and the general public have shown a strong partiality for Lassie’s sable and white.

  • Sheds heavily.

  • Needs regular brushing.

Health and Wellness:

  • Autoimmune thyroid disease.

  • Gastric dilatation and volvulus syndrome (GDV, also commonly called bloat).

  • Patent ductus arteriosis.

  • Microphthalmia.

  • Collie-eye anomaly.

  • Dermatomyositis.

  • Hemophilia.

  • Cylic neutropenia.

  • Invermectin toxicosis.

  • Congenital deafness.

  • Metabolic bone disease.

  • Discoid lupus erythematosis.

  • Idiopathic epilepsy.

  • Progressive retinal atrophy.

  • Skin tumors.

  • Nasal tumors.

  • Bladder tumors.

What you should know:

  • This is not a suitable dog for an apartment.

  • In the spring and summer they become mobile hair spreaders.

  • The wished for dog of many a child who has read the Lad books of Albert Payson Terhune or watched Lassie on television.

  • Females shed much more than males, and look ratty by summer’s end.  This is why the movie Lassie has always been a Laddie!

  • In spite of its good press, great beauty, and high recognition index, the Collie is not even in the top twenty-five breeds in popularity.

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Collie (Smooth)

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Scotch Collie

Country/Date of origin:
  • Great Britain

  • ...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Scotch Collie

Country/Date of origin:
  • Great Britain

  • 1500′s

Height:
  • Females:  22 to 24 inches

  • Males 24 to 26 inches

Weight:
  • Females:  50 to 65 pounds

  • Males:  60 to 75 pounds

Personality:
  • Collies exhibit the qualities of loyalty , intelligence, and gentleness that are the stuff of hero dogs.

  • Easy to train.

  • A desire to please is hard-wired in the Collie’s genetic makeup.

  • They are a noisy breed.  Many owners, as a last resort, cut the vocal cords of compulsive barkers.

History:

An ancient breed of herding dog, the Rough Collie shares a common heritage with the Border Collie.  In the 1860′s, the Rough Collie caught the eye of people interested in the beauty of the dog and bred it to increase body size and the thickness of its coat.  The bigger, slower Rough Collie was able to compete for the shepherd’s favor with the increased popularity of the larger, slower English sheep (more wool), and it began to find its way back into the fields.  With the patronage of Queen Victoria, the Collie became the vogue in the 1880′s.   American royalty, in the form of J. P. Morgan, championed the breed across the Atlantic as well.  In 1885, Collies were admitted into the American Kennel Club (AKC) and great specimens were fetching more than the average man earned in 10 years.  There are two varieties of the Collie.  Everything that can be said about the smooth-coated Collie can be said about the rough variety except for coat.  It has played Cinderella to its more glamorous rough-coated sibling except where it counts—in working situations.  The Smooth Collie has shone as a military dog in the two World Wars, as a guide for the blind, and as a search and rescue dog.

Body Type:
  • Identical to the rough Collie except for coat.

  • The tail is long and carried low.  It is never altered.

  • The ears are erect and fold forward at the tips.  They are never altered.

  • The merle colored smooth Collie often has one blue eye and one brown eye.  This is perfectly normal.

Coat:
  • Short, harsh, flat coat with a weather-resistant undercoat.

  • Permissible colors are sable and white, tricolor, blue merle and white.

  • Moderate grooming required.

Health and Wellness:
  • Autoimmune thyroid disease.

  • Gastric dilatation and volvulus syndrome (GDV, also commonly called bloat).

  • Patent ductus arteriosis.

  • Microphthalmia.

  • Collie-eye anomaly.

  • Dermatomyositis.

  • Hemophilia.

  • Cylic neutropenia.

  • Invermectin toxicosis.

  • Congenital deafness.

  • Metabolic bone disease.

  • Discoid lupus erythematosis.

  • Idiopathic epilepsy.

  • Progressive retinal atrophy.

  • Skin tumors.

  • Nasal tumors.

  • Bladder tumors.

What you should know:
  • Smooths and Roughs can be born in the same litter.  In some countries they are shown as separate breeds, but in the United States they are considered varieties of the same breed.

  • The wished for dog of many a child who has read the Lad books of Albert Payson Terhune or watched Lassie on television.

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Dachschund (Smooth)

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Teckel

  • Doxie

     
Country/Date of origin:
  • Germany

  • 18th...

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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Teckel

  • Doxie

     
Country/Date of origin:
  • Germany

  • 18th century

Height:
  • Miniatures:  5 to 6 inches

  • Standards:  6 to 10 inches

Weight:
  • Miniatures:  under 11 pounds

  • Standards:  10 to 20 pounds (larger animals are not disqualified)

Personality:
  • A happy, fun-loving personality has made this breed immensely popular all over the world.

  • Gets along well with other pets.

  • Likes to play.

  • Each of the three coat varieties has a slightly different personality.  The Smooth is the most stubborn of the trio.

History:

Made in Germany, the Dachshund was most likely bred from the same ancestors as the Basset.  The six different types of Dachshunds reflect the various animals that it was used to hunt.  The larger, smooth-haired dogs went to ground after badger and fox.  The smaller smooths went to ground in the smaller den tunnels of weasels and rabbits.  The long and wire haired varieties were better able to tear through brambles and thickets than their smooth coated relatives.  The breed has been popular in the United States for over a hundred years.  It is one of the foundation breeds of the American Kennel Club (AKC).

Body Type:
  • A long, low dog with short, bent forelegs.

  • Designed to go to ground after badger and fox.

Coat:
  • Coat on the smooth variety is short, glossy, and lies close to the body.

  • Allowed colors are: single color—red or black (although not desirable); two colored—black, chocolate, gray, and white each with tan markings.

  • The most common is the black-and-tan; and dappled—a clear brownish or grayish color with dark irregular patches of dark gray , brown or black (neither color should dominate).

  • Minimal grooming.

Health and Wellness:
  • Gastric dilatation and volvulus syndrome (GDV, also commonly called bloat)

  • von Willebrand’s disease.

  • Portosystemic shunts.

  • Pattern baldness.

  • Acanthosis nigricans.

  • Microphthalmia.

  • Cryptorchidism.

  • Acquired hypogammaglobulinemia.

  • Congenital deafness.

  • Juvenile cellulitis.

  • Hypothyroidism.

  • Mast cell tumor.

  • Diabetes mellitus.

  • Intervertebral disc disease.

  • Urolithiasis (cystine).

  • Keratoconjunctivitis sicca.

  • Ear margin dermatosis.

  • Pemphigus foliaceus.

  • Sudden acquired retinal degeneration.

  • Cushing’s syndrome (PDH) and AT)

  • Mitral insufficiency.

  • Squamous cell carcinoma (digit).

  • Lipoma.

What you should know:
  • Smooth-coated Dachshunds are the most popular variety.

  • Dachshunds do not have a strong doggy odor and adapt well to city life.

  • Dachs means badger in German, and the dog got its name from the animal it was bred to hunt.

  • A cheerful companion.

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Devon Rex

Personality:
  • Intelligent and curious.
  • Playful, active, and very affectionate.
  • Reported...
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Personality:
  • Intelligent and curious.
  • Playful, active, and very affectionate.
  • Reported to enjoy eating asparagus, grapes, and cantaloupe.
  • Wag their tails when happy.
  • Have large vocabulary of cat sounds.
History:

In 1960, a natural mutation caused British barn cats to produce kittens with soft wavy coats, elf-like faces and over-sized ears.  The Rex gene that causes the wavy coat in the Devon Rex is different from the Rex gene that causes the wavy coat in the Cornish Rex.  Outcrosses with other shorthaired breeds have been allowed to increase the gene pool.  Accepted for championship by the Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA) in 1983.

Body Type:
  • Medium-sized with a broad chest and medium-fine boning.
  • Head is shaped in a modified wedge with strikingly large ears.
  • Eyes are large and wide set with a color appropriate to coat color.
Coat:
  • No-shed coat is very short, soft, and wavy.
  • Often lack whiskers.
  • Colors include basic solid colors (white, black, blue, red, cream, chocolate, lavender, cinnamon and fawn), shaded colors (the solid colors with a silver base), tabby patterns, bi-colors and pointed.
What you should know:
  • Your Devon Rex will want to eat almost anything.  Be prepared to share your corn on the cob, salads, and spaghetti.
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Dachschund (Wirehaired)

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Teckel
  • Doxie
     
Country/Date of origin:
  • Germany
  • 18th century
...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Teckel
  • Doxie
     
Country/Date of origin:
  • Germany
  • 18th century
Height:
  • Miniatures:  5 to 6 inches
  • Standards:  6 to 10 inches
Weight:
  • Miniatures:  under 11 pounds
  • Standards:  10 to 20 pounds (larger animals are not disqualified)
Personality:
  • A happy, fun-loving personality has made this breed immensely popular all over the world.
  • Gets along well with other pets.
  • Likes to play.
  • Each of the three coat varieties has a slightly different personality.  The wirehaired is more playful than the other two.  It is almost impish.
History:

Made in Germany, the Dachshund was most likely bred from the same ancestors as the Basset.  The six different types of Dachshunds reflect the various animals that it was used to hunt.  The larger smooth haired dogs went to ground after badger and fox.  The smaller smooths went to ground in the smaller den tunnels of weasels and rabbits.  The long and wire haired varieties were better able to tear through brambles and thickets than their smooth coated relatives.  The breed has been popular in the United States for over a hundred years. It is one of the foundation breeds of the American Kennel Club (AKC).

Body Type:
  • A long, low dog with short, bent forelegs.
  • Designed to go to ground after badger and fox.
  • The wirehaired variety is allowed to have slightly longer legs than the other two Dachshunds.
  • Long tail is carried straight out behind and is not altered.
  • Hanging ears are long and are not altered.
Coat:
  • Coat on the wirehaired variety is a uniform, short, thick, rough, hard outercoat with a fine shorter undercoat.
  • Wirehaired Dachshunds must have a beard and bushy eyebrows.
  • The hair on the ears is not long.  It is shorter than that on the body.
  • Allowed colors are: single color—red or black (although not desirable), and a grizzle called wild boar; two colored—black, chocolate, gray, and white each with tan markings; and dappled—a clear brownish or grayish color with dark irregular patches of dark gray , brown or black (neither color should predominate).
  • The most popular colors of this variety are red and wild boar.
  • Hand stripping is required to keep a Wirehaired Dachshund in a show coat.  Otherwise, grooming is moderate.
Health and Wellness:
  • Gastric dilatation and volvulus syndrome (GDV).
  • von Willebrand’s disease.
  • Portosystemic shunts.
  • Pattern baldness.
  • Acanthosis nigricans.
  • Microphthalmia.
  • Cryptorchidism.
  • Acquired hypogammaglobulinemia.
  • Congenital deafness.
  • Juvenile cellulitis.
  • Hypothyroidism.
  • Mast cell tumor.
  • Diabetes mellitus.
  • Intervertebral disc disease.
  • Urolithiasis (cystine).
  • Keratoconjunctivitis sicca.
  • Ear margin dermatosis.
  • Pemphigus foliaceus.
  • Sudden acquired retinal degeneration.
  • Cushing’s syndrome (PDH & AT).
  • Mitral insufficiency.
  • Squamous cell carcinoma (digit).
  • Lipoma.
What you should know:
  • Dachshunds do not have a strong doggy odor and adapt well to city life.
  • Dachs means badger in German, and the dog got its name from the animal it was bred to hunt.
  • A cheerful companion.
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Dalmatian

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Carriage Dog
  • Plum Pudding Dog
  • Fire House Dog
Country/Date...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Carriage Dog
  • Plum Pudding Dog
  • Fire House Dog
Country/Date of origin:
  • Former Yugoslavia
  • 1400′s
Height:
  • 19 to 23 inches
Weight:
  • 50 to 55 pounds
Personality:
  • Multi-talented.  It has been a dog of war, watchdog, shepherd, hunter and ratter.

  • Loving and spirited.

  • A quick learner.

  • Reserved with strangers.

  • A natural watchdog that doesn’t like other dogs in its territory.  It was selectively bred for this quality for many years.

History:

The Dalmatian has filled many roles in its long history.  It is a fine sporting dog, working before the gun as a pointer.  It was a shepherd in its native Dalmatia (what was once Yugoslavia).  It was, however, as a coaching guard that it reached its flowering.  Trained to run underneath the carriage, the Dalmatian would dart out and protect the horses from stray dogs that menaced them, and conversely, the horses protected it.  The Dalmatian’s ability to exactly match the horse’s pace let it slip between the moving feet to get away from a pack of curs.  In the days when fire apparatus was pulled by horses, the Dalmatians were welcomed in the fire houses where they kept vermin at bay.  Dalmatians were one of the first breeds exhibited at organized shows in the United States.

Body Type:
  • A medium-sized, well-balanced dog not exaggerated in any way.

  • Instantly identified by its distinctive, bold, spotted patterning.

  • The long, thin tail is carried and never altered.

  • The high-set ears are carried close to the head and are not altered.

  • The gait of the Dalmatian is very important.  It must be a steady rhythm of one, two, three, four, as if in military cadence.  This allowed the dogs to safely pace themselves underneath a moving carriage.

Coat:
  • Short, harsh and dense.

  • Permissible colors are black or liver-brown markings set on a pure white background.

  • The size, shape and distribution of the spots is a very important consideration in choosing a Dalmatian.  They should be round and well delineated.  They may be as large as a silver dollar.

  • The color of the nose must match the color of the spots.  Black spotted dogs have black noses.  Brown spotted ones have brown noses.

  • Minimal grooming required.

Health and Wellness:
  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Laryngeal paralysis.

  • Congenital deafness.

  • Globoid cell leukodystrophy.

  • Chronic hepatitis.

  • Urolithiasis (urates).

  • Atopy.

  • Bacterial folliculitis.

  • Solar dermatitis.

  • Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, actinic).

  • Hemangioma (actinic).

  • Hemangiosarcomas.

What you should know:
  • Dalmatian is commonly mis-spelled with an o.

  • The name is a denotes the dog’s place of origin—Dalmatia.

  • Two children’s books, The Twilight Howling and 1001 Dalmatians propelled this breed, via Disney, onto the top ten list in American Kennel Club (AKC) registrations.

  • A jogger’s dog, the breed needs lots of exercise.

  • If confined it can be destructive or become a compulsive barker.

  • This breed has an unusual affinity for horses.

  • Puppies are born solid white.  The spots don’t appear till the whelps are about 10-days old.

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Dandie Dinmont Terrier

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Pepper and Mustard terrier

  • Dandie

     
Country/Date of origin:
...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Pepper and Mustard terrier

  • Dandie

     
Country/Date of origin:
  • Britain (border area between Scotland and England)

  • 16th century

Height:
  • 8 to 11 inches at shoulder

Weight:
  • 18 to 24 pounds

Personality:
  • One-person dog.

  • Inclined to be stubborn.

History:

Originally bred to hunt small game, the Dandie Dinmont Terrier is as hard-bitten as the varmints that share its homeland in the border area between England and Scotland.  This farmer’s dog became the darling of country squires in 1814 when it was mentioned in Sir Walter Scott’s novel, Guy Mannering.  Popularity was immediate, and the little varmint dogs became the darling of urban society as well.  They were one of the first breeds accepted in the American Kennel Club (AKC).

Body Type:
  • Unlike most terriers, the Dandie is a dog of curves instead of angles.

  • Short of leg and long of body, the Dandie has a large head and big, soulful eyes.

  • Pendulous ears are not altered.

  • Long tail is not altered.

Coat:
  • An unusual mixture of hard and soft hairs, which feels crisp but not harsh to the touch.  The ratio of hard hair to soft is 2:1.

  • A long, silky topknot is the breed’s hallmark.

  • Dandies require professional grooming.

  • Two coat colors are permitted: pepper and mustard.

Health and Wellness:
  • Like most long bodied dogs, Dandies often suffer from disc disease.

  • Can become obese if pampered.

What you should know:
  • The only dog to take its name from a literary character.  In Guy Mannering (Sir Walter Scott’s 1814 novel), a farmer named Dandie Dinmont had game little terriers called Pepper and Mustard.  The breed became known as Dandie Dinmont’s terriers.

  • Stairs can be a problem for an older Dandie.

  • Puppies that are black and tan at birth turn into Peppers and those that are sable, become Mustards.  The transformation takes about nine months.

  • Late bloomers.  Not mature till they are three-years old.

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Texas West Animal Health

16367 South FM 4,

Santo, TX 76472

Phone. 940-769-2222

Fax. 866-632-3365

Email. texaswestvet@gmail.com