BREED INFORMATION

Doberman Pinscher

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Dobermann
Country/Date of origin:
  • Germany
  • 1800′s
Height:
    ...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Dobermann
Country/Date of origin:
  • Germany
  • 1800′s
Height:
  • Females: 24 to 26 inches
  • Males:  26 to 28 inches
     
Weight:
  • 68 to 88 pounds
Personality:
  • This dog looks and acts like an aristocrat.
  • Loving and loyal to its master, but offers a challenge to strangers on its territory.
  • An alert watchdog with natural guarding qualities.
  • Quick in mind and body.
  • Can become hyperactive if deprived of vigorous exercise every day.
  • Males can be aggressive with other dogs.
  • If you are not a dominant person, obedience training can be a struggle with this large, dominant dog.
History:

In the 1870′s, a German tax collector named Louis Dobermann wanted a dog to accompany him on his rounds.  He needed a dog as alert, protective, and intelligent as the German Shepherd Dog but with the grace and agility of a terrier.  The breed he created twenty years later was named after him.  He had achieved his goal.  By blending dogs such as the Rottweiler, German Pinscher, and Black and Tan Terrier he got a smart guard dog with a fearless nature.  The Doberman Pinscher made its debut in American show circles in 1921. Today, it is among the top twenty most popular breeds in the United States.

Body Type:
  • Sleek, well-muscled, and elegant in appearance.
  • Hanging ears are cropped to an erect point in the United States.
  • Tail is docked short.
Coat:
  • Short, fine, close lying coat.
  • Permissible colors are black, deep red, blue, or fawn.
  • All colors with sharply defined rust markings above each eye, on muzzle, throat, forechest, legs, feet, and below tail.
  • Requires minimal grooming.
Health and Wellness:
  • Hip dysplasia.
  • Autoimmune thyroid disease.
  • Gastric dilatation and volvulus syndrome (GDV, also commonly called Bloat).
  • Color dilution alopecia.
  • von Willebrand’s disease.
  • Juvenile glomerulonephropathy.
  • Dominance aggression.
  • Immunodeficiency (neutrophil function defect).
  • Congenital deafness.
  • Metabolic bone disease.
  • Follicular dysplasia.
  • Cervical vertebral instability (Wobbler’s syndrome).
  • Chronic hepatitis.
  • Cardiomyopathy.
  • Demodicosis.
  • Pemphigus foliaceus.
  • Acral lick dermatitis.
  • Melanoma.
  • Osteosarcoma (appendicular).
What you should know:
  • In the United States, the breed name is spelled with one “n” at the end.  Elsewhere, it has a double “n” as in the name of Louis Dobermann (the breed’s creator).
  • Dobermans have had bad press, not entirely undeserved.  Overbreeding, which is usually synonymous with poor breeding, left a superb working dog with a multitude of physical and temperament problems.  These have been significantly improved in the past few decades.
  • Not suggested for families with limited space.
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English Cocker Spaniel

Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Great Britain

  • 1800′s

...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Great Britain

  • 1800′s

Height:
  • Females:  15 to 16 inches

  • Males:  16 to 17 inches

Weight:
  • Females:  26 to 32 pounds

  • Males:  28 to 34 pounds

Personality:
  • The Cocker Spaniel is described as merry.

  • Loyal and affectionate.

  • Intelligent with a desire to please, which makes training easy.

History:

 

The English Cocker Spaniel, or Cocker Spaniel as it is known in the rest of the world, is a bird dog designed to work before the gun, springing or flushing game out of cover.  In litters of spaniels, the smallest ones were used to work woodcock, a bird that hides in dense thickets.  The breed gets its name from the game bird it hunted.  Eventually, the different types of spaniels were separated into various breeds.  The most popular being the little Cockers.  Cockers not only flush birds and hares, they retrieve them as well.  In the United States, a distinct variation began to emerge in the early part of the 2oth century.  By 1946, the two types of Cocker were sufficiently different to be split into two breeds.  The American Kennel Club (AKC) granted the name Cocker to the new American variation, and distinguished the original by calling it the English Cocker Spaniel.

Body Type:
  • A larger, lighter-coated spaniel than the American Cocker.

  • The tail is set low and is carried even with the back.  It is always moderately docked.

  • The long, hanging ears are set low and are not altered.

Coat:
  • The long coat is silky.  It may be flat or slightly wavy.

  • Permissible colors are white, black, black and tan, or roan pattern in blue, liver, red, orange, or lemon.

  • Moderate grooming required, with occasional professional trimming.

Health and Wellness:
  • Congenital deafness.

  • Cardiomyopathy.

  • Otitis externa.

  • Chronic hepatitis.

  • Atopy.

  • Food allergy.

  • Lip-fold pyoderma.

  • Primary seborrhea.

  • Sebaceous adenomas.

  • Hyperplasia.

What you should know:
  • This dog loves to play.

  • A happy little dog.

  • Needs a great deal of exercise.

  • Should not be difficult to find but not as available as the American Cocker Spaniel.

 

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Dogo Argentino

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Argentinean Mastiff

Country/Date of origin:
  • Argentina

  • ...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Argentinean Mastiff

Country/Date of origin:
  • Argentina

  • 1920′s

Height:
  • 24 to 27 inches

Weight:
  • 80 to 100 pounds

Personality:
  • A dog deliberately bred to be fierce.

  • Loyal and loving to owner.

  • Can be aggressive toward people it does not know, especially if it thinks they are trespassing on its property.

  • Bold and brave, seemingly impervious to pain.

History:

A recent South American creation, the Dogo Argentino was bred to hunt big cats in its homeland.  They have also proved effective in guarding cattle against poachers, both the two- and four-legged variety.  It is descended from an old fighting dog which originated in Spain.  Father of the breed, Dr. Antonio Martinez, reportedly added some Boxer blood to increase the dog’s tractability.  The Dogo’s notoriously fierce temperament has put it on the list of banned dogs in Britain. It is, however, legal to own them in the United States and they are becoming popular for guard work and probably illegal dog fighting.

Body Type:
  • Looks like an overgrown Pit Bull Terrier.

  • Ears are cut to short, erect triangles with sharply pointed tips.

  • Tail is thick and tapered.  It is moderately long and not altered.

Coat:
  • Short, dense and harsh to the touch.  Lies close to the skin.

  • Only color allowed is white.

  • Pink skin shows through near the eyes and nose.

  • Low grooming requirements.

Health and Wellness:
  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Skin allergies and irritations.

What you should know:
  • This is just too much dog for the average person.

  • Bold, aggressive, and dominant, the Dogo Argentino will walk all over an owner if given the chance.

  • Professional obedience lessons are a must.

  • Many insurance companies will not provide you with liability coverage if you own a Dogo Argentino.

  • Check with your insurance agent to see if you will be covered before you purchase a puppy.

  • Dogos should be protected from dognappers who would steal them for use in pit fights.

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Dogue De Bordeaux

Other names/Nicknames:
  • French Mastiff

Country/Date of origin:
  • France

  • 4th century

    ...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • French Mastiff

Country/Date of origin:
  • France

  • 4th century

Height:
  • 23 to 27 inches

Weight:
  • 80 to 100 pounds

Personality:
  • Beneath the scowling face there really is a pugnacious nature.

  • This breed does not take to strangers.

  • A natural guarding instinct.

  • Extremely loyal to the person it chooses as its master.

  • Generally calm and tranquil in nature.

  • Not a high-energy animal.

  • Surprisingly agile when aroused.

History:

The Dogue De Bordeaux can trace its ancestry back to the great Mastiff dogs that came across the alps with the Roman legions.  From the same stock that produced the Rottweiler, the Dogue obviously has been infused with more than a dash of Bulldog blood, too.  For centuries, the dogs served as guards and dispatchers of large, dangerous animals.  In temperament and disposition they were meant to be aggressive and surly.  This has been a stumbling block to the breed’s popularity today.  Some of the fierce nature has been bred out and they are enjoying a new surge in popularity.

Body Type:
  • A typical dog of the Mastiff family, with a foreshortened muzzle.

  • Ears are set well back on the head and are small for the dog’s size.  They are not altered.

  • Tail is medium length and tapers.  It is carried low and is not altered.

  • Eyes are light amber to match the coat tones.

  • An undershot jaw and furrowed wrinkles on the brow impart a characteristic scowl and pugilistic expression.

Coat:
  • Short, fine, and soft.

  • Color is a solid red.

  • Dark red with warm tones is preferred.

  • There must be a contrasting face mask of darker tone.  In the red-fawn dogs it is a dark red; in the dark-red dogs it is black.

  • Moderate grooming.

Health and Wellness:
  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Bloat.

  • Bone cancer.

  • Thyroid problems.

  • Fungal or bacterial infections in deep wrinkles.

What you should know:
  • Almost unknown in the United States until 1988 when the movie Turner and Hooch introduced the breed.

  • The biggest drawback of owning a Dogue De Bordeaux is the slobber.

  • Snorts, snuffles and spit go with the breed.

  • Can be fierce with other dogs.

  • Puppies should be available in most parts of the United States.

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Egyptian Mau

Personality:
  • Extremely intelligent, loyal, active, and devoted.

  • Sociable and...

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Personality:
  • Extremely intelligent, loyal, active, and devoted.

  • Sociable and affectionate, but can be aloof with strangers.

  • Only natural breed of domestic spotted cat.

  • Frequently express happiness by chortling and wiggling their tails while treading with their forepaws.

  • Many have been known to defend their owners when necessary.

History:

One of the oldest breeds of domestic felines dating back to 1400 B.C.  Drawings of spotted cats can be seen in the tombs of Egyptian pharaohs.  In 1956, three Egyptian Maus were brought to the United States by an exiled Russian princess and became the foundation for the breed.  Granted championship status in the Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA) in 1977.

Body Type:
  • Medium-sized and long, with well-developed muscular strength.

  • Hind legs are longer then front, giving the appearance of being on tip toe when standing upright.

  • Head is a slightly-rounded wedge with medium to large ears

  • Green eyes are large and alert.

Coat:
  • Medium length with a lustrous sheen.

  • Random spotting with contrasting bands of darker color (ticking) on legs and tail.

  • Four colors:  silver, bronze, smoke, and black on black (black is not accepted for shows but is valuable in many breeding programs).

Health and Wellness:
  • Some lines have problems with asthma.

  • As with asthma in humans, air passages in the lungs constrict causing difficult breathing.

  • Medication is available to alleviate symptoms.

What you should know:
  • This is the only natural breed of spotted cats.

  • Egyptian Maus have a relatively limited gene pool.

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Fila Brasileiro

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Brazilian Mastiff

Country/Date of origin:
  • Brazil

  • 1800′s

...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Brazilian Mastiff

Country/Date of origin:
  • Brazil

  • 1800′s

Height:
  • 24 to 30 inches

Weight:
  • 100 pounds minimum

Personality:
  • Characterized by an intense loyalty to its master.

  • Territorial and will guard its property without being told.

  • Aggressive towards strangers.

History:

The Fila developed as an all-around, working dog on the great cattle estancias of Brazil.  They descend from Portuguese herding dogs that were introduced in colonial times, English Mastiffs, old-style Bulldogs, and Bloodhounds.  This resulted in a tough, bold guardian that can also hunt jaguar, drive cattle, and act as a tracker in police work.  Still little known outside of its native Brazil, the Fila has a reputation for being fierce.  It is banned in England under the Dangerous Dogs Act.

Body Type:
  • A robust, short-coated dog of the Mastiff type.

  • Ears are triangular and hang flat against the face.

  • Tail is moderately long and not altered.

  • The Bloodhound influence is evident in heavy dewlap and pronounced lip flews.

  • Hind legs are longer than the forelegs, giving the dog the appearance of going downhill when it is standing.

Coat:
  • Short, dense, and harsh to the touch.

  • All colors and combination of colors allowed with the exception of solid white.

  • Brindle is the most common.

  • Low grooming requirements.

Health and Wellness:
  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Bloat.

  • Bone cancer.

  • Heart problems.

What you should know:
  • Call these dogs Fee-luh in the Brazilian manner.

  • This is too much dog for the average person.

  • Bold, aggressive, and dominant, the Fila will walk all over an owner if given an inch.

  • Professional obedience lessons are a must to get a puppy under control.

  • Many insurance companies will not provide you with liability coverage if you own a Fila.  Check with your insurance agent before purchasing a puppy.

  • Filas should be protected from dognappers who could steal them for use in pit fights.

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Finnish Hound

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Suomenajokoira

  • Finnish Stovare

Country/Date of origin:
  • ...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Suomenajokoira

  • Finnish Stovare

Country/Date of origin:
  • Finland

  • 1800′s

Height:
  • 20-1/2 to 24 inches

Weight:
  • 55 to 60 pounds

Personality:
  • Affectionate and friendly to all.

  • Not as inclined to roam as other Foxhound types.

  • High energy.

History:

Typical of Scandinavia’s Stovare-type of hunting hound, the Finnish version, called Suomenajokoira in its native land, is about a 100-years old.  It was created by crossing English Foxhounds, French and German hounds, and some of the older Stovare-types in Sweden.  By 1870, the type was fixed but appearance in this breed has never been as important as hunting ability.  Its quarry is the hare and the fox, which it flushes and pursues.

Body Type:
  • A medium-sized hound of the Foxhound type.

  • Long, hanging hound ears stand out slightly from the head and are not altered.

  • Long tail is not altered.

Coat:
  • A short, thick coat that is both coarse and rough.

  • Traditional hound tricolor markings of black, red, and white.

  • Sheds profusely for a shorthaired dog.  Otherwise, minimal grooming.

Health and Wellness:
  • Exceptionally healthy.

  • Hip dysplasia.

What you should know:
  • Although the Finnish Hound is not often seen outside its native land, it is the most popular dog in that country.

  • A puppy will be difficult to locate in the United States.

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Finnish Spitz

Other names/Nicknames:

  • Finsk Spets

  • Barking Bird Dog

Country/Date of origin:

  • ...
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Other names/Nicknames:

  • Finsk Spets

  • Barking Bird Dog

Country/Date of origin:

  • Finland

  • 1800′s

Height:

  • Females:  15-1/2 to 18 inches

  • Males:  17-1/2 to 20 inches

Weight:

  • 30 to 35 pounds

Personality:

  • Gay and lively companion.

  • Intelligent but tends to be strong willed, so training can be difficult.

  • Noisy.

History:

One of the oldest European breeds of dog, the Finnish Spitz accompanied the early Finns on hunting expeditions.  Unlike most members of the spitz family this is primarily a bird dog.  If it finds birds, it points at the prey, waving its tail back and forth to mesmerize them.  It will also bark loudly to attract the attention of the hunter, giving it the sometimes used name of Barking Bird Dog.  In contests, it is judged on the number of barks per minute, which can top 160 per minute.  Extremely popular in its homeland and the rest of Scandinavia.  Its good qualities as a house pet have won it fanciers in England and the United States in the last few years as well.

Body Type:

  • A typical member of the spitz group with a distinctly foxlike appearance.

  • The plumed tail is set high and curves forward in a tight curl.  It is not altered.

  • The ears are erect and sharply pointed.  They are not altered.

Coat:

  • Dense, double coat.  Moderately-short and harsh outercoat and very thick undercoat.

  • The color is red, ranging from reddish brown to red gold.

  • Moderate grooming required.

  • Heavy seasonal shedding.

Health and Wellness:

  • Generally quite healthy.

  • Subject to hip dysplasia.

  • Pemphigus foliaceus.

What you should know:

  • National dog of Finland.

  • Likes to roam.

  • An adorable, cuddly puppy, the Finnish Spitz does not like to be petted and fondled—even as a baby.

  • It is somewhat aloof and a bit reserved.

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Flat Coated Retriever

Other names/Nicknames:
  • None
Country/Date of origin:
  • England
  • Mid 19th century
Height:
...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • None
Country/Date of origin:
  • England
  • Mid 19th century
Height:
  • Females:  22 to 23-1/2 inches
  • Males:  23 to 24-1/2 inches
Weight:
  • 60 to 70 pounds
Personality:
  • Attentive and friendly.
  • This breed loves everybody.
  • Very intelligent and wants to please.
  • Not possessive enough to be a good watchdog.
  • A serious worker on land and water.
History:

Created in England from two American breeds, the Newfoundland and the Labrador.  It was the gamekeeper’s dog of choice in the late 1800′s in the United KIngdom because of its splendid temperament and working abilities on both land and water.  It dropped from favor, however, with the rise of the Golden Retriever and the Labrador and has never regained the wide acceptance it once had.  It was one of the foundation breeds in the American Kennel Club (AKC) stud books.

Body Type:
  • A medium-sized hunting dog of the retriever type.
  • Short, well-feathered tail is not altered.
  • Small ears that hang close to the head are not altered.
Coat:
  • Dense coat of medium length lies as close to the body as possible, as the breed’s name would suggest.
  • Allowable colors are solid black or liver.  Black is the more common color.
  • Medium grooming.
Health and Wellness:
  • Free from most health problems that affect more popular breeds.
  • Patella luxation.
  • Idiopathic epilepsy.
What you should know:
  • A great tail wagger.  If you own one, you will have to remove breakable objects from low tables.
  • This breed was the most popular retriever in England in the 1880′s but it was never popular in the United States.
  • A puppy may be difficult to locate.
  • Unspoiled and overlooked, the Flat-Coated Retriever is a great family dog that can be shown, worked in obedience, and hunted over.
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Fox Terrier (Smooth)

Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • England

  • 1700′s

Height:
  • Up ...

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Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • England

  • 1700′s

Height:
  • Up to 15 1/2 inches

Weight:
  • 16 to 18 pounds

Personality:
  • The arch typical terrier.

  • Always on the go.

  • Extremely energetic.

  • The quarrelsome nature of the Fox Terrier does not make it suitable for families with other pets.

  • Intelligent but often difficult to train because it has self-appointed jobs to do that may conflict with your agenda.  His own schedule will invariably take precedence.

History:

There are two varieties of Fox Terrier—smooth and the wire haired.  Until recently, the two coats were shown as varieties of a single breed.  The Smooth Fox Terrier predates the Wire Haired variety by about 20 years.  The old Black and Tan Wire Haired Terrier was liberally crossed with Smooth Fox Terriers.  This was done to get the predominately white color that hunters wanted to protect their dogs from savaging by hounds, which often got dark colored terriers confused with fox or other vermin.  The Fox Terrier became one of the most recognized dogs in the world because the British took it with them wherever they went.  Smooths were shown at the very first organized dogs shows.  In fact, some of those early shows were for Fox Terriers only.  The breed in both varieties were founding stock when the American Kennel Club (AKC) was formed.

Body Type:
  • A sturdy terrier that is a dog of sharp angles.

  • Brims with vigor and vitality, as evidenced in its quick and constant movement.

  • Button ears are not altered.

  • Erect tail is docked.

Coat:
  • Coat is smooth and lies close to the body.  It should be dense and abundant.

  • There must be no visible bare spots anywhere on the body.

  • White must be the predominate color so the terrier can be seen and distinguished from a fox or badger during the hunt.

  • Markings are black, tan, or ginger.

  • Color patterns on the Wire Haired Fox Terrier are often different from those occurring on the Smooth Fox Terrier.

Health and Wellness:
  • Tetralogy of Fallot.

  • Ectopic ureter.

  • Myasthenia gravis.

  • Legg-Perthes disease.

  • Idiopathic epilepsy.

  • Atopy.

  • Skin tumors.

What you should know:
  • A veritable barking machine.

  • Fox Terriers have won Best In Show at the Westminster Dog Show more times than any other breed.

  • Best known as the dog depicted in His Master’s Voice the trademark of RCA Victor records.

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Field Spaniel

Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Great Britain

  • 1800′s

...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Great Britain

  • 1800′s

Height:
  • Females:  17 inches

  • Males:  18 inches

Weight:
  • 35 to 50 pounds

Personality:
  • A friend to all.

  • This spaniel has the typical cheerful nature that has made the family so popular around the world.

  • Gets along well with other pets.

  • Gentle and easy going.

  • Very willing to do your bidding.

History:

One of the youngest of the spaniel breeds, the Field Spaniel is slower than the Cocker Spaniel and lower to the ground than the Springer Spaniel.  It does the same job, however, flushing or springing game from cover so the hunter can shoot it.  At the end of the 19th century, a passion for a stylized spaniel was almost the undoing of the Field Spaniel.  They were bred so low and so long, with such heavy bones and short legs, that they were useless in the field.  In the 20th century an infusion of Springer and Cocker Spaniel blood fixed most of the excesses.  Today, it is a happy, healthy breed again.

Body Type:
  • Longer and lower than other spaniels.  Otherwise, a typical spaniel build.

  • The docked tail is carried low, usually below level of the back.

  • The low-set, hanging ears are not altered.

Coat:
  • The silky, glossy coat should be flat or slightly wavy, never curly.  It is more setter-like than spaniel.

  • Permissible colors are black, liver, golden liver, roan, mahogany red, or any of these with tan markings.

  • Moderate grooming required.

Health Concerns:
  • Subject to hip dysplasia.

  • Possible ear trouble.

What you should know:
  • The rarity of this breed will make finding a puppy rather difficult.

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French Bulldog

Other names/Nickname:
  • Bouledogue Francais

  • Frenchie

     
Country/Date of origin:
  • ...
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Other names/Nickname:
  • Bouledogue Francais

  • Frenchie

     
Country/Date of origin:
  • France

  • 1800′s

Height:
  • 12 inches

Weight:
  • Up to 28 pounds

  • An average would be 18 pounds

Personality:
  • A perfect little companion.

  • Although the Frenchie tends to be a one-person dog, it is cordial to all.

  • Always ready to play.

  • Sweet-tempered and dependably cheerful.

  • Quiet.  Bark little as a rule.

History:

The history of the Gallic Bulldog is entwined with that of the English Bulldog.  There is considerable debate about whether the dog was a miniature version of the English Bulldog and was shipped off to France as an undesirable, or was developed on the European Continent and later brought to England.  At any rate, the Frenchie is without doubt a miniature version of its stouter Anglo Saxon cousin.  There are two rather significant differences beyond the obvious size one.  The Frenchie’s wide-set, bat ears are unique to it, and its skull is flat between the ears and domed as it comes down toward the nose.  In the larger Bulldog the ears are held in the tightly-curled, rose position and the skull must show no signs of a bulging dome.  The Frenchie was traditionally a woman’s pet.  It was shown in the United States in 1898 in the ballroom of the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York, the first time a dog show had been held in any place so grand.  It caused quite a sensation.

Body Type:
  • In appearance, a miniature Bulldog with erect ears.

  • The head is very big and the body wedge shaped, wide at the front and tapering to the rear.

  • The naturally-short tail is set low and can be either straight or screwed, but not curly.

  • The ears are erect and have a distinctive, batlike shape.  These identifying hallmarks of the breed are not altered.

Coat:
  • Short, fine coat that lies close to the body.

  • Permissible colors include all brindles, solid colors (with the exception of liver), mouse, or black.

  • The acceptable colors may or may not be combined with white.

  • Minimal grooming required.

Health and Wellness:
  • Brachycephalic airway syndrome.

  • Cleft lip and palate.

  • Pyloric stenosis.

  • Hemivertebrae.

  • Dystocia.

  • Atopy.

  • Follicular dysplasia.

  • Intervertebral disc disease (IVDD).

What you should know:
  • A breed on the comeback trail.  Once, one of the most popular dogs in America, the Frenchie was out of favor for many years.  Today, its registrations are on the rise again, and deservedly so.

  • This is an excellent pet for an apartment dweller.

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Fox Terrier (Wirehaired)

Other names/Nicknames:

  • None

Country/Date of origin:

  • England

  • ...
read more

Other names/Nicknames:

  • None

Country/Date of origin:

  • England

  • 1700′s

Height:

  • up to 15 1/2 inches

Weight:

  • 16 to 18 pounds

Personality:

  • The arch-typical terrier.

  • Always on the go.

  • Extremely energetic.

  • The quarrelsome nature of the Fox Terrier does not make it suitable for families with other pets.

  • Intelligent but often difficult to train because it has self-appointed jobs to do that may conflict with your agenda.  His own schedule will invariably take precedence.

History:

There are two varieties of Fox Terrier:  Smooth and Wirehaired.  Until recently, the two coats were shown as varieties of a single breed.  The Smooth Fox Terrier predates the Wirehaired variety by about 20 years.  The old Black and Tan Wirehaired Terrier was liberally crossed with Smooth Fox Terriers.  This was done to get the predominately white color that hunters wanted to protect their dogs from savaging by hounds, which often got dark colored terriers confused with fox or other vermin.  The Fox Terrier became one of the most recognized dogs in the world because the British took it with them wherever they went.  Smooths were shown at the very first organized dogs shows.  In fact, some of those early shows were for Fox Terriers only.  The breed in both varieties were founding stock when the American Kennel Club (AKC) was formed.

Body Type:

  • A sturdy, rough terrier that is a dog of sharp angles.

  • Whiskers and beard are trimmed to accentuate the square look.

  • Button ears are not altered.

  • Erect tail is docked.

Coat:

  • Double, weatherproof coat.

  • Outer hairs are hard and wiry without any tendency to curl.

  • Undercoat is soft and insulating.  Professional grooming required.

  • White must be the predominate color, so the terrier can be seen and distinguished during the hunt from a fox or badger.

  • Markings are black, tan, or ginger.

  • Color patterns on the Wirehaired Fox Terrier are often different from those occurring on the Smooth Fox Terrier.

Health and Wellness:

  • Tetralogy of Fallot.

  • Ectopic ureter.

  • Legg-Perthes disease.

  • Idiopathic epilepsy.

  • Atopy.

  • Glaucoma.

  • Skin tumors.

What you should know:

  • A veritable barking machine.

  • Fox Terriers have won Best In Show at the Westminster Dog Show more times than any other breed.

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German Longhaired Pointer

Other names/Nicknames:

  • Deutsche Langhaar Vorstehhund

Country/Date of origin:

  • ...
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Other names/Nicknames:

  • Deutsche Langhaar Vorstehhund

Country/Date of origin:

  • Germany

  • 19th century

Height:

  • 23-1/2 to 25-1/2 inches

Weight:

  • 65 pounds

Personality:

  • Gentle and docile.

  • More like a setter in temperament than a pointer.

  • Affectionate.

  • Intelligent and easily trained.

History:

There are three types of German Pointer:  the Shorthaired, the Wirehaired and the Longhaired.  The first two are closely related and popular around the world.  The third, the German Longhaired Pointer, had a great deal more spaniel blood in its original makeup as an attempt to create a dog that would be better at water work than the other two pointers.  It is believed that the now extinct Old Water Spaniel and various spaniels from France were the foundation stock and later other blood was introduced, notably that of the Gordon Setter.  The German Longhaired Pointer is a handsome gun dog that can work feathered game on land and water.  He is slow and thorough in the field with an unremarkable nose, which may account for the fact that the breed is still relatively unknown outside of Germany.

Body Type:

  • Resembles a coarse, Irish Setter.

  • Hanging ears are well feathered and not altered.

  • Long, feathered tail is held in setter fashion and is not altered.

Coat:

  • Double coat is glossy, slightly waved, and about two-inches long.

  • Legs, tail, and ears have distinct feathering.

  • Allowable colors are liver or liver-and-white.

  • Moderate grooming required.

Health and Wellness:

  • Hip dysplasia.

What you should know:

  • The German Longhaired Pointer has almost become extinct several times in its history.  However, it has a group of loyal supporters in Germany at the moment.

  • It will be hard to find a puppy of this breed in the United States.

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German Pinscher

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Deutscher Pinscher

Country/Date of origin:
  • Germany

  • 1800′s

    ...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Deutscher Pinscher

Country/Date of origin:
  • Germany

  • 1800′s

Height:
  • 17 to 20 inches

Weight:
  • 25 to 35 pounds

Personality:
  • Loyal and devoted to family.

  • A good watchdog, as it is suspicious of strangers and will bark an alarm.

  • Not a barker.

  • Intelligent and easily trained.

  • Are talented in obedience, agility, and search and rescue (SAR).

  • Sensitive nature.  Will not take harsh criticism.

  • Need systematic and consistent training at a young age.

  • Tend to be hyperactive as puppies if not given enough to occupy mind and body.

  • Calm down greatly as adults.

History: The smooth-haired Pinscher has been mentioned in the German stud book since 1880.  He has the same ancestors as the Schnauzer, which was also called the rough-coated Pinscher.  The two dogs differed in their color and coat type.  In Germany, the Pinscher is a watch and companion dog.  Very active and alert, the German Pinscher has clean, muscular lines that give it the look of barely restrained power.  The standard size has never achieved the international popularity of the other two Pinschers.
Body Type:
  • In relation of length to height, the Pinscher’s build should be as square as possible and medium in size.

  • V-shaped, drop ears are set high.  Ears are not docked.

  • Tail is natural.

Coat:
  • Short, fine, and glossy.

  • Dense and smooth, close and shiny.

  • Allowed colors are black and tan, deer red, reddish-brown to dark red or brown.

  • Minimal grooming.

Health and Wellness:
  • Generally healthy breed.

  • Subject to skin allergies.

  • Tend to be sensitive to vaccination if given too many at a time.

  • Lifespan up to 12 years.

What you should know:
  • Often mistaken for a young Doberman Pinscher.

  • In spite of their similar heritage and resemblance in looks, their personalities are quite different.

  • A good house pet.

  • Pinschers bond strongly with their owners and love to share the sofa.

  • Love to play games and socialize well with other dogs and people.

  • Clean as a cat.  Has almost no body odor.

  • Can be noisy, but not usually.

  • German Pinschers are not barkers unless they are disturbed by a sound or bell.

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German Shepherd Dog

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Alsatian

  • Deutscher Schaferhund

  • Police Dog

Country/Date of...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Alsatian

  • Deutscher Schaferhund

  • Police Dog

Country/Date of origin:
  • Germany

  • 1800′s

Height:
  • Females:  22 to 24 inches

  • Males:  24 to 26 inches

     
Weight:
  • 75 to 95 pounds

Personality:
  • The intelligence of the breed is legendary.

  • Wants to please and is sensitive to the moods of its owner.

  • Natural protective instincts.

  • Easy to train.

History:

Although it has a long and distinguished line of sheep-working ancestors, the modern incarnation of the German Shepherd Dog begins in 1882 (the first time it was exhibited at a dog show).  From the moment it was first seen, the world knew it was looking at a super dog.  Championed by Herr von Stepanitz and rigorously controlled by the German Breed Club, the German Shepherd Dog came to full flower in the 20th century.  Concern that the dogs be of sound mind and body, culminated in the result that championships were only granted if both qualities were judged to be superior.   It is unparalleled as a working dog and companion.  It was the original Seeing Eye Guide, the standard by which other military and police dogs were judged, and a star of movies and television.   Originally smooth, wired and long-haired varieties were shown.  The wire was eliminated in preference to the other two varieties.  The smooth is the dog we know today, although a long haired one pops up from time to time.  The first German Shepherd Dog was registered in the United States in 1912.  To protect the dog from anti-German sentiment during the First World War, the Kennel Club dropped the “German” from its name.  It was restored in 1932, just in time for World War II.

Body Type:
  • Has a slightly elongated body and a strong muscular build.

  • Ears are high set and carried erect.  They are not altered.

  • The tail is long and bushy.  It is carried low and is never altered.

Coat:
  • The harsh, short, straight coat is dense and lies close to the body.

  • The most common color is black and tan.  Also allowed are solid black or tan.

  • Although the current German Shepherd Dog Club of America breed standard currently lists white as a disqualifying color, white is the second most common color registered for German Shepherds by the American Kennel Club (AKC).  The AKC permits competition of White German Shepherds in all of the performance events open to German Shepherds.

  • Has a tendency to shed.

  • Needs regular brushing.

Health and Wellness:
  • The enormous popularity of this breed has resulted in careless breeding that has crippled the German Shepherd Dog with a whole catalog of genetic diseases.

  • Elbow dysplasia.

  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Autoimmune thyroid disease.

  • Gastric dilatation and volvulus syndrome (GDV, or commonly called bloat)

  • Calcinosis circumscripta.

  • Patent ductus arteriosis.

  • Subaortic stenosis.

  • Persistent right aortic arch (PRAA).

  • Ventricular ectopy.

  • Pituitary dwarfism.

  • Hemophilia A.

  • von Willebrand’s disease.

  • Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.

  • Immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency.

  • Protective aggression.

  • Fear-elicited aggression.

  • Congenital deafness.

  • Metabolic bone disease.

  • Cataracts.

  • Lymphoma.

  • Addison’s disease.

  • Megaesophagus.

  • Lupoid onychodystrophy.

  • Metatarsal fistula.

  • Perianal fistulae.

  • Atopy.

  • Food allergy.

  • Pyoderma.

  • Discoid lupus erythematosis.

  • Inflammatory bowel disease.

  • Idiopathic epileps.

  • Keratitis.

  • Nodular dermatofibrosis.

  • Splenic torsion.

  • Acral lick granuloma.

  • Sialocele.

  • Cushing’s syndrome (PDH & AT)

  • Hemangiosarcoma.

  • Degenerative myelopathy.

  • Cauda equina syndrome.

  • Osteosarcoma.

  • Nodular dermatofibrosis and renal cystadenocarcinomas.

  • Keratoconjuncitivitis sicca.

  • Nasal tumors.

What you should know:
  • Ranks third in AKC registrations behind the Labrador and the Rottweiler.

  • The German Shepherd Dog came to symbolize everything German.  Adolf Hitler bred German Shepherds, and while he was Chancellor he would exhibit them in shows.  Imagine what the judges felt when they were presented with his less-than-perfect pets!

  • To protect American dogs from anti-German sentiment they were often referred to as Alsatians, an attempt to give the dogs a less inflammatory name.

  • The American White Shepherd Association is working toward recognition of the White Shepherd as a separate breed with the AKC, as it is in much of Europe already.  The United Kennel Club (UKC) will be recognizing the White Shepherd as a separate breed starting in 1998.  The White Shepherd Club of Canada has received the support of the Canadian Kennel Club to begin their efforts to obtain separate breed status in Canada.

  • As superior as the Shepherd is, health and temperament problems should be taken into consideration before selecting this breed.

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English Foxhound

Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • England

  • 1700′s

Height:
  • 24 ...

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Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • England

  • 1700′s

Height:
  • 24 to 25 inches

Weight:
  • 62 to 70 pounds

Personality:
  • The English Foxhound is generally loyal to its owner.

  • Likes to wander.

  • Described as a real sporting dog.

History:
Body Type:
  • Natural tail is carried low and is not altered.

  • Ears hang and are usually rounded off with about one inch altered.

  • Resembles the American Foxhound but is heavier boned.

Coat:
  • The coat is short, hard, and dense.

  • Permissible colors are any of the hound colors, usually black, white, and tan.

  • Minimal grooming required.

Health and Wellness:
  • No serious genetic faults.

  • Should not be allowed to get too heavy.

  • Should be checked for hip dysplasia.

  • Congenital deafness.

What you should know:
  • Not a typical house pet, this dog does best with people who are serious about dogs.

  • They are usually kept in pack kennels of 20 to 30 dogs.

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English Springer Spaniel

Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Great Britain

  • 1800′s

...
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Other names/Nicknames:
  • None

Country/Date of origin:
  • Great Britain

  • 1800′s

Height:
  • 19 to 20 inches

Weight:
  • 40 to 50 pounds

Personality:
  • Gentle and easygoing.

  • The typical spaniel personality.

  • Very affectionate with everyone.

  • Gets along well with other dogs.

  • Playful and loves to engage in rough-and-tumble games.

History:

The English Springer is a member of the British family of spaniels.  These hunting dogs are used before the gun to spring or flush birds into the air.  Cockers and Springers were once found in the same litter.  The smaller ones were used for woodcock and became known as Cockers.  The larger ones became known as Springer or starter spaniels and eventually became a separate breed.  The versatility and hunting prowess of the English Springer makes it the spaniel of choice for hunters in the United States.  It was accepted into the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1932.

Body Type:
  • One of the tallest spaniels, it is distinguished from the Cocker Spaniels by its longer legs and heavier head.

  • The tail is set low and carried nearly horizontal.  It is always moderately docked.

  • The long, wide, hanging ears are never altered.

Coat:
  • Flat, wavy, and of medium length it is sufficiently dense to be waterproof.

  • Marked feathering on ears and legs.

  • Permissible colors are liver or black, with white markings; liver or black and white, with tan markings; blue or liver roan; white with tan, black, or liver markings.

  • The most commonly seen are the black and white and liver and white varieties.

  • Requires moderate grooming to prevent matting, with occasional professional trimming.

Health and Wellness:
  • Hip dysplasia.

  • Gastric dilatation and volvulus syndrome (GDV, also commonly called bloat).

  • Calcinosis circumscripta.

  • Phosphofructokinase deficiency.

  • Fucosidosis.

  • Ventricular septal defect.

  • Congenital deafness.

  • Myasthenia gravis.

  • Otitis externa.

  • Atopy.

  • Food allergy.

  • Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA).

  • Cushing’s syndrome (AT).

  • Skin tumors.

What you should know:
  • One of America’s favorite dogs.

  • In the top twenty five in popularity.

  • Adapts well to city life but needs plenty of exercise.

  • Rowdy when young.

  • Obedience training is recommended.

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English Toy Spaniel

Other names/Nicknames:
  • Ruby Spaniel

  • King Charles Spaniel

  • Blenheim Spaniel

  • Prince...

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Other names/Nicknames:
  • Ruby Spaniel

  • King Charles Spaniel

  • Blenheim Spaniel

  • Prince Charles Spaniel

Country/Date of origin:
  • England

  • 1600′s

Height:
  • 10 to 11 inches at shoulder

Weight:
  • 8 to 14 pounds

Personality:
  • Despite its scowling visage, this is a merry-hearted dog.

  • Likes its comfort.

  • Gets along well with other pets.

  • Attentive but not demanding.

  • It is a clingy kind of dog that doesn’t want to leave your side.

  • Not outgoing with strangers.

History:

The early history of these little lap dogs is not clearly defined.  It is thought they originated in China and arrived in England via Europe.  For hundreds of years, they have been the pampered darlings of English royalty.  They have a lingering hunting instinct, which probably indicates that they were crossbred with small Cocker or Springer Spaniels over the years.  It is not known, however, if they were ever used for hunting purposes.  There are four varieties that are identical except for coloring.  One of the foundation breeds of the American Kennel Club (AKC).

Body Type:
  • A miniature spaniel in appearance, with a short tail and pushed in face.

  • Hanging ears are so long they touch or almost touch the ground.  They are not altered.

  • Docked tail is cut to about 1-1/2 inches and is covered with hair that is 3 or 4 inches in length.

  • The tail is not carried above the level of the back.

  • Docking is optional, and dogs with long tails are often seen.

  • The very short face has a wide, turned-up muzzle.

  • The head is domed and is one of the most important points of the breed.

  • Protruding tongue is a serious fault.

Coat:
  • The coat is moderately long, very thick, and wavy but not curly.

  • The ears and feet are especially heavily coated.

  • In the Black-and-Tan, the hair on the ears is longer than that of the other varieties.

  • There are four allowed color patterns:  Ruby—a solid ruby red; Black and Tan ( King Charles)—a black body with tan points; Blenheim—a white ground coat with patches of red chestnut (a blaze of white, extending up the forehead and ending in a loop with a red dot in the center, is required for this color); and Tricolor (Prince Charles)—which is a white ground dog with black patches and tan spots over the eyes, on the muzzle, chest, and legs. The ears and vent should also be lined with tan.

  • Moderate grooming.

Health and Wellness:
  • Large, prominent eyes are subject to injury and infection.

  • Pushed in face may cause breathing problems.

  • Dislocation of joints.

  • Ear infections cause by lack of air circulating around the heavily coated, hanging, leathers.

  • Large head causes whelping difficulties.

What you should know:
  • Low exercise requirements make this an ideal dog for older people.

  • Hard to train to do traditional obedience exercises, but good manners seem to be inbred in the Toy Spaniel.

  • Mary, Queen of Scots, went to the scaffold with one of these little dogs that refused to leave her side.

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Exotic Shorthair

Personality:
  • Enjoy human companionship.

  • Tranquil, quiet, and peaceful.

History:
...
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Personality:
  • Enjoy human companionship.

  • Tranquil, quiet, and peaceful.

History:

Hybrid developed by crossing Persians with American Shorthairs in order to create an American Shorthair with a flatter face and bigger eyes.  In order to stop the crosses, Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA) closed the American Shorthair registry and recognized the hybrid as a separate breed.  Breed is judged against the standard of the Persian.  Received championship status in CFA in 1967.

Body Type:
  • Medium to large with heavy bones and soft, round lines.

  • Head is round and massive with a wide skull, a Persian- like, snubbed, broad nose and flattened face.

  • Ears are small and round tipped.

  • Eyes are large, round, and brilliant in color.

Coat:
  • Coat is medium short in length and has a plush texture that stands out because of a dense undercoat.

  • Over 50 colors and patterns including solids, shaded, smokes, tortoiseshell, tabby patterns, and points.

Health and Wellness:
  • Polycystic kidney disease (PKD).

  • Dystocia.

What you should know:
  • Coat does not mat and requires much less grooming than Persians.

  • Kittens born with the long coats of their Persian ancestors cannot be shown in CFA.

  • In The International Cat Association (TICA), kittens having long coats can be registered and shown as Persians.

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Texas West Animal Health

16367 South FM 4,

Santo, TX 76472

Phone. 940-769-2222

Fax. 866-632-3365

Email. texaswestvet@gmail.com