PHARMACEUTICAL INFORMATIONS

Pet Library

We’re always happy when we can put our experience and expertise to use for the good of our patients and their owners. Our goal is to become a valuable resource to our clients and the community as a whole. Please feel free to browse through our extensive online library of articles which covers a variety of topics that we feel may be helpful to you, from general wellness to medications to behavior and alternative therapies. Have a question or topic you don’t see here?  Let us know – we’d be happy to help!

Amitraz Dip

General Description: Amitraz dip is a topical solution applied to your dog’s coat to treat mange (usually Demodex). Mix the dip according to directions and be sure to use a fresh mixture with each...

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General Description: Amitraz dip is a topical solution applied to your dog’s coat to treat mange (usually Demodex). Mix the dip according to directions and be sure to use a fresh mixture with each treatment. Follow your veterinarian’s directions to achieve the best results. Do not rinse off Amitraz dip and allow your pet to air-dry. Read and follow all safety precautions on packaging. Available in 10.6 mL bottles.

What is this drug?

An antiparasitic dip
A monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI)
Amitraz dip is applied topically
Reasons for prescribing:

Used in dogs to treat generalized demodicosis (Demodex mange), caused by a small mite
It may be used to treat other types of mange
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Safety is unknown for breeding, pregnant and nursing dogs
Dogs less than 4 months of age
Dogs taking MAOI drugs such as Anipryl, Selegiline or using a Preventic® Tick Collar
Dogs with deep bacterial skin infections
Rabbits
Use with caution in diabetic dogs
Dogs known to have had an allergic reaction to the amitraz or like products before
Directions:

Follow your veterinarian’s dosage and directions. If you have difficulty administering the treatment, contact your veterinarian.

Clip medium- and long-haired dogs. Prior to treatment, shampoo, rinse and towel dry your dog. To protect the dog’s eyes, place ophthalmic ointment in each eye. All handlers should wear eye protection and rubber gloves.

Mix a fresh mixture of amitraz ensuring a correct dosage. Avoiding the dog’s eyes, completely wet the dog with the amitraz mixture. Do not rinse off or towel dry. Allow the dog to air dry. Do not allow dog to lick treated hair.

Repeat every 14 days for 3-6 treatments. Keep the dog dry between treatments.

Your veterinarian will need to perform periodic skin scrapings to determine how many treatments will be necessary.

Wash hands and arms with soap and water after treating dogs.

Avoid handling dogs immediately after treatment.

Do not stress animals for at least 24 hours.

What if dose is missed?

If a treatment is missed, apply it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next treatment, skip the missed treatment and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two treatments at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your dog need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your dog has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your dog has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your dog has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your dog has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your dog or plan to give your dog, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your dog’s medicines can be given together.
If your dog is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your dog
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Undiluted amitraz is flammable.

Do not inhale vapors.

Flush unused amitraz down the drain. Do not re-use container.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and dogs.

This product is very toxic if taken by mouth. Contact poison control if oral contact is made by humans or animals.

Human diabetics and people taking MAOI’s should use extreme caution when using amitraz.

Potential side effects:

Most common side effect is sedation which may last up to 3 days
Incoordination, slow heart rate, vomiting, diarrhea and low body temperature
Side effects are more common in older, weak or small breed dogs. Dosages may need to be altered.
It is important to stop therapy and contact your veterinarian immediately if you think your dog has a medical problem or side effect from this product’s therapy
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with corticosteroids, fluoxetine, immunosuppressant drugs, meperidine or a Preventic Tick Collar.
If your dog experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if dog receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, amitraz should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about amitraz. If you have any questions or concerns about amitraz or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

©North American Compendiums Inc. 2009. All rights reserved

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Amlodipine besylate

General Description: Amlodopine besylate is a calcium channel blocking agent used to manage high blood pressure in dogs and cats. This product may be given once a day (usually) with or without food....

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General Description: Amlodopine besylate is a calcium channel blocking agent used to manage high blood pressure in dogs and cats. This product may be given once a day (usually) with or without food. Your veterinarian will want to recheck your pet periodically to ensure this medication is achieving the desired result.

What is this drug?

Amlodipine besylate is a calcium channel blocker
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Used to treat high blood pressure in cats (systolic blood pressure exceeding 160 mmHg)
Used to decrease blood pressure in dogs with chronic kidney disease
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Since the liver removes this drug from the system, patients with liver disease will have dosages monitored carefully
Breeding, pregnant or nursing pets
Used with caution in patients with a history of heart failure
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to the active ingredient
Directions:

Amlodipine besylate may be given with or without food.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is usually givenonce a day .

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. If you have difficulty giving the medication, contact your veterinarian.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

Call ahead for refills.

What if dose is missed?

Missing even one dose can lead to a significant rise in blood pressure, which could lead to other serious health issues. If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store this medicine in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Some humans taking amlodipine besylate report headaches. In pets, it is difficult to tell if they may experience this side effect.
Loss of appetite, low blood pressure or rapid heart rate
Lethargy, weight loss
Gum swelling
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but it is used with care with other drugs that drop blood pressure: fentanyl, diuretics (furosemide), ACE inhibitors (enalapril), or beta-blockers (propranolol).
Use with care in dogs already taking drugs that thin the blood (warfarin, aspirin).
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, amlodipine besylate should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

It is likely that your veterinarian will periodically want to monitor your pet’s blood pressure and evaluate the cat’s retinas for signs of bleeding.

This is just a summary of information about amlodipine besylate. If you have any questions or concerns about amlodipine besylate or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

©North American Compendiums Inc. 2009. All rights reserved

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Amoxicillin

General Description: A broad-spectrum antibiotic commonly used to treat many bacterial infections in dogs and cats (ex. bite wounds, dental infections, respiratory tract, gastrointestinal and urinary ...

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General Description: A broad-spectrum antibiotic commonly used to treat many bacterial infections in dogs and cats (ex. bite wounds, dental infections, respiratory tract, gastrointestinal and urinary tract infections). Amoxicillin is available as tablets or as an oral suspension.

What is this drug?

A broad spectrum, synthetic member of the penicillin class; an antibiotic
Usually given by mouth twice daily.
Reasons for prescribing:

Because of its broad spectrum nature, it is useful against many bacteria infections and is frequently used when bacteria sensitivity is unknown
Especially useful in anaerobic infections (those growing without oxygen)
Often used in: bite wound infections, upper respiratory tract infections, dental infections, gastrointestinal tract infections, urinary tract infections
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Pets with Staph infections (amoxicillin is ineffective vs Staph except those in the bladder, or when used in combination with clavulanic acid)
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to penicillin or another antibiotic before
Use with caution in very small animals who may be dehydrated or have kidney or heart disorders
Directions:

For liquids, shake well before accurately measuring the dose.

Give this medication with or without food.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed.

Give this medication for as long as your veterinarian directs. Finish the entire course of treatment.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store suspension in the refrigerator. Discard reconstituted suspension in two weeks.

Store tablets at room temperature in a cool, dry place. Keep away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

People with allergies to penicillins or beta-lactam antibiotics should not handle this drug since allergic reactions could occur from contact.

Potential side effects:

Nausea may be experienced. Give the medication with food to reduce effect
Decreased appetite, drooling, diarrhea, vomiting
Allergic reactions are rare, but if your pet shows irregular breathing, rash, fever, hives, scratching, puffiness or facial swelling, or anything else unusual, stop therapy and contact your veterinarian immediately
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with aspirin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, tetracyclines, aminoglycosides, cephalosporins and probenecid.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

This is just a summary of information about amoxicillin. If you have any questions or concerns about amoxicillin or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

As with all prescribed medicines, amoxicillin should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

©North American Compendiums Inc. 2009. All rights reserved

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Amoxicillin-Clavulanic Acid

General Description: A broad spectrum antibiotic used to treat many infections in dogs and cats. The combination of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid increases its effectiveness against many types of...

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General Description: A broad spectrum antibiotic used to treat many infections in dogs and cats. The combination of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid increases its effectiveness against many types of bacteria and is often used in skin and soft tissue infections as well as upper respiratory, bladder and dental infections (dogs). Amoxicillin-clavulanic acid is available in both oral drops and four sizes of tablets.

What is this drug?

An aminopenicillin combined with a beta-lactamase inhibitor to broaden its spectrum, including Staph infections; an antibiotic
Usually given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Because of its broad spectrum nature, it is useful against many bacteria infections and is frequently used when bacteria sensitivity is unknown
Often used in: skin and soft tissue infections, upper respiratory infections and bladder infections in dogs and cats and dental infections in dogs
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

If pet has had an allergic reaction to penicillin or another antibiotic before
Use with caution in very small animals who may be dehydrated or have kidney or heart disorders
Directions:

For liquids, shake well before accurately measuring the dose.

Give this medication with or without food.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is normally given two or three times daily.

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed.

Tablets should not be split prior to use because air will cause them to deteriorate.

Give this medication for as long as your veterinarian directs. Finish the entire course of treatment.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store suspension in the refrigerator, though if it is mistakenly left out of the refrigerator for a day, it’s not a problem. Discard reconstituted suspension in 10 days.

Store tablets at room temperature in a cool, dry place. Keep away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Do not use human form of this drug (Augmentin®) unless you have specific instructions from your veterinarian. It contains a different concentration of clavulanic acid than the veterinary form.

People with allergies to penicillins or beta-lactam antibiotics should not handle this drug since allergic reactions could occur from contact.

Potential side effects:

Nausea, decreased appetite, vomiting and diarrhea may be experienced. Give the medication with food to reduce effect.
It is felt that this drug is safe to use (with caution) during pregnancy
Allergic reactions are rare, but if your pet shows irregular breathing, rash, fever, hives, scratching, puffiness or facial swelling, or anything else unusual, stop therapy and contact your veterinarian immediately
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with aminoglycosides, blood thinners, cephalosporins, chloramphenicol, dipyradamole, erythromycin, inflammation or pain medication (except narcotics), tetracyclines and probenecid.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

This is just a summary of information about amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. If you have any questions or concerns about amoxicillin-clavulanic acid or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

As with all prescribed medicines, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

©North American Compendiums Inc. 2009. All rights reserved

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Amitriptyline Hydrochloride

General Description: Amitriptylline hydrochloride is a tricyclic antidepressant used to control various behavior problems in dogs and cats. It may also be used to control some types of pain as well...

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General Description: Amitriptylline hydrochloride is a tricyclic antidepressant used to control various behavior problems in dogs and cats. It may also be used to control some types of pain as well as severe itching. Best results are achieved with most behavior drugs by simultaneous use of behavior modification training. Amitryptilline is available as an oral liquid or as tablets or capsules.

What is this drug?

A tricyclic antidepressant used to control various behavior disorders and neuropathic pain and severe itching in dogs and cats
Reason for prescribing

Treat excessive grooming, separation anxiety or generalized anxiety in dogs
Treat excessive grooming, urine spraying and anxiety in cats
Prevent itching in dogs
Treat neuropathic pain (chronic pain due to nerve injury)
May decrease signs of urinary tract inflammation in cats
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Pets that have shown a prior sensitivity to other tricyclic drugs or like products before
Pets that are presently using monoamine oxidase inhibitors
Use with extreme caution in pets known to seizure, as the seizure threshold is lowered
Use with caution in pets with thyroid disorders, liver disorders, KCS (‘dry eye’ syndrome), glaucoma, cardiac rhythm disorders, diabetes or adrenal tumors
Pregnant pets
Directions:

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. It is normally given once or twice a day.

Give this medication for as long as your veterinarian directs. Do not stop giving it suddenly as it must be tapered off slowly in order to prevent the animal suffering uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms.

Call ahead for refills.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What results should I expect?

It may take several weeks before effects of the medication are noted.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

Signs of the condition your pet has
When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines (including tick collars) and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Keep in a cool, dry place at room temperature. Protect the injection from light and freezing.

People should not take this product. Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Dogs: sedation, hyperexcitability, seizures, disorientation, faster heart rate, dry mouth (frequent licking of lips), bone marrow suppression, low platelet count (bruising), urine retention, constipation, diarrhea, vomiting, or various endocrine effects
Cats: sedation, drooling, urinary retention, anorexia, low platelet count (bruising), unkempt hair coat, vomiting, disorientation or faster hear rate
Signs of an allergic reaction could include: facial swelling, hives, scratching, sudden onset of diarrhea, vomiting, shock, seizures, pale gums, cold limbs, or coma
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

The following drugs can potentially interact with amitriptyline: amitraz, antithyroid drugs (medicine for overactive thyroid), barbiturates, cimetidine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, sedatives and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (Anipryl®).
Overdosing?

Overdosing with tricyclics can be life threatening. Contact your veterinarian immediately if your pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

This is just a summary of information about amitriptyline. If you have any questions or concerns about amitriptyline or the condition it was prescribed for, contact to your veterinarian.

As with all prescribed medicines, amitriptyline should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed. It is important to periodically discuss your pet’s response to amitriptyline at regular check ups. Your veterinarian will best determine if your pet is responding as expected and if your pet should continue receiving amitriptyline.

©North American Compendiums Inc. 2009. All rights reserved

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Acepromazine

General Description: Acepromazine is commonly used in dogs and cats as a sedative and as a pre-anesthetic agent. It may be used to prevent vomiting, alleviate various behavior issues, reduce itching...

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General Description: Acepromazine is commonly used in dogs and cats as a sedative and as a pre-anesthetic agent. It may be used to prevent vomiting, alleviate various behavior issues, reduce itching and more. This medication should only be given to the pet which it was prescribed. Acepromazine is available in 5 mg, 10 mg and 25 mg tablets.

What is this drug?

Acepromazine is a neuroleptic agent; used as a tranquillizer in pets
Acepromazine can be given by mouth, or at your veterinarian’s as an injection
Reasons for prescribing:

Used to help sedate animals for minor procedures (grooming, veterinary examination, treatment, minor surgical procedures, etc.)
Used to prevent nausea/motion sickness
To alleviate fear, nervousness, excessive vocalization
Used as a pre-anesthetic agent before an animal is anesthetized
To keep heart rhythm stable under certain conditions
To alleviate itching due to skin irritations
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Use with caution in Boxers and Sighthounds (greyhounds, whippets, wolfhounds, etc.) are sensitive
Use with caution in pets with history of liver disease or blood abnormalities
Those in shock, or animals with tetanus or suffering strychnine poisoning
Pets exposed to organophosphate insecticides, including flea collars, within a month of using acepromazine
Pets currently using other depressants
Pets with high blood pressure or other circulation problems
Pets with seizure disorders
Geriatrics or those in a weakened state
Pregnant or nursing animals
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to acepromazine or other phenothiazines
Directions:

Acepromazine tablets are absorbed differently by different animals. Some pets will appear heavily sedated, while others will be hardly tranquilized. The dose may need to be individualized by your veterinarian based upon your pet’s response.

Most effective if given when the animal is not stimulated or excited.

Acepromazine’s effects are expected to last 6-8 hours.

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store acepromazine in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

People should not take this product. Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Pet’s third eyelid will rise partly over eye. This is a normal reaction to the drug and not harmful to the pet.
Because the drug depresses the central nervous system, the pet will experience sedation, depression, lack of coordination, low blood pressure, slower heart rate and breathing
Rarely, some pets show aggressive behavior (aggression, biting, chewing, nervousness)
Possible thermoregulation difficulties; pet may become too hot or too cold
Pale gums
Urine may turn pink or red-brown
Constipation
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with aminoglycoside antibiotics, antacids, atropine, barbiturates, bismuth subsalicylate compounds, epinephrine, kaolin-pectin, organophosphate insecticides (including flea collars and many products used outdoor flea treatment products), procaine, propranolol, phenylpropanolamine, phenytoin, quinidine and tricyclic antidepressants.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, acepromazine should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about acepromazine. If you have any questions or concerns about acepromazine or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

©North American Compendiums Inc. 2009. All rights reserved

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Alprazolam

General Description: Alprazolam is an oral benzodiazepine tranquilizer used in dogs and cats for the treatment of various behavior disorders, especially anxiety problems. It is also used as a...

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General Description: Alprazolam is an oral benzodiazepine tranquilizer used in dogs and cats for the treatment of various behavior disorders, especially anxiety problems. It is also used as a sedative, helps suppress seizure activity and is useful as a muscle relaxant. Best results are achieved with most behavior drugs by simultaneous use of behavior modification training. Alprazolam is available in 0.25 mg, 0.5 mg, 1 mg and 2 mg tablets.

What is this drug?

Alprazolam is a benzodiazepine tranquilizer
Alprazolam is given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

To treat panic disorders in dogs (especially those associated with fireworks, thunderstorms, or other loud noise stimuli)
To reduce anxiety disorders in cats (ex. house soiling)
For use as a sedative
Often used in combination with other anti-seizure medication
For use as a muscle relaxant
May be prescribed in conjunction with behavior modification training
Lasts longer than diazepam
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Use with caution in pets with liver or kidney disease
Use with caution in older, debilitated animals, or those with certain types of glaucoma
Use with caution in working dogs (military/police/seeing eye/hearing, etc.) as too much sedation may impede their ability to work and learn
Pregnant and nursing animals
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to alprazolam or other benzodiazepine medications (ex. Valium)
If your pet is presently taking like products (unless directed by your veterinarian)
Directions:

Medication takes 1-2 hours to reach maximum effect.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is usually given two to four times daily.

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy.

Give this medication for as long as your veterinarian directs. Finish the entire course of treatment.

Alprazolam is a controlled drug. You will need a new prescription every 6 months. Your veterinarian must keep special records of its use.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store alprazolam in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Sedation, drowsiness
Rare dogs have experienced excitation instead of sedation
Can become addictive
Possible liver failure in cats. Liver enzymes should be monitored before and during therapy.
Some anti-anxiety medications used on aggressive animals may stimulate aggressive behavior. Always supervise a test-dose to ensure your pet is not over-tranquilized or aggressive.
Cats: behavior changes (irritability, increased affection, depression)
Discontinuing alprazolam abruptly may lead to unpleasant withdrawal symptoms
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with antacids, cimetidine, digoxin, erythromycin, isoniazid, itraconazole, ketoconazole, other CNS depressants (narcotics, barbiturates), propranolol, rifampin and valproic acid.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, alprazolam should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about alprazolam. If you have any questions or concerns about alprazolam or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

©North American Compendiums Inc. 2009. All rights reserved

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Aluminum hydroxide

General Description: Oral antacids have been prescribed to your pet to neutralize excess acid in the stomach. This may be useful if your pet has an inflamed esophagus or stomach, to prevent stomach...

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General Description: Oral antacids have been prescribed to your pet to neutralize excess acid in the stomach. This may be useful if your pet has an inflamed esophagus or stomach, to prevent stomach ulcerations or if your pet has kidney failure, they may be used to decrease the amount of phosphate in the blood. Many oral liquids, capsules and tablets are available over-the-counter. Discuss with your veterinarian which product will be most useful for your pet.

What is this drug?

An antacid
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

To neutralize excess stomach acid
For the treatment or prevention of stomach ulceration, or inflammation of the esophagus or stomach
For the treatment of high blood phosphorous levels associated with kidney failure
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Avoid using while pet is nursing kittens/puppies
Pets with kidney disease
Pets who have any condition that causes slow emptying of the stomach
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to aluminum hydroxide or like products before
Directions:

For liquids, shake well before accurately measuring the dose.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. It is usually givenevery four hours.

Give this medication for as long as veterinarian directs. Do not skip doses or stop giving the medication without consulting your veterinarian.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can, regardless of feeding status. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Possible side effects:

This medication is usually well tolerated (hence the reason they are ‘over the counter’ drugs)
Constipation (encourage your pet to drink as much as possible to lessen this effect)
For pets being treated for high phosphorus levels related to kidney disease, phosphorus blood levels will need to be monitored
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Many drugs (including aspirin) can possibly interact with aluminum hydroxide. Inform your veterinarian if your pet is currently taking any other medications.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, aluminum hydroxide should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about aluminum hydroxide. If you have any questions or concerns about aluminum hydroxide or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

©North American Compendiums Inc. 2009. All rights reserved

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Amantadine

General Description: Amantadine has been prescribed for your pet as an antiviral agent or to relieve pain (ex. arthritis, post-declaw surgery, cancer pain, chronic pain). It may be used in...

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General Description: Amantadine has been prescribed for your pet as an antiviral agent or to relieve pain (ex. arthritis, post-declaw surgery, cancer pain, chronic pain). It may be used in combination with other pain relievers for optimum benefit. Amantadine is available as 100 mg tablets and as an oral solution.

What is this drug?

Originally used as an antiviral medication against influenza (the flu). Now, it is mainly used in combination with pain relievers to improve their effects.
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Treat arthritis pain
Treat chronic pain associated with declaw surgery
Treat neuropathic pain (chronic pain due to nerve injury)
Treat cancer pain, especially osteosarcoma (bone cancer)
As an antiviral agent
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Since this drug is newer to veterinary medicine, cautions used in human medicine should be exercised. Therefore, extra care should be used in pets with kidney disease, seizure disorders, behavioral disorders, liver disease or congestive heart disease.
Pets with untreated glaucoma
Pregnant or nursing animals
Directions:

The actual dose to be given should be prescribed by the veterinarian.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed.

Give this medication for as long as your veterinarian directs. Call ahead for refills.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

For liquids, shake well before accurately measuring the dose.

Give this medication with or without food.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep in an airtight container.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Gastrointestinal effects: nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, flatulence, diarrhea
Agitation (most likely to occur in first few days)
Humans report various mental side effects, for example, hallucinations and dizziness
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

The following drugs can potentially increase the effect of amantadine: some diuretics (‘water pills’), quinidine (heart medication) and trimethoprim sulfa (antibiotic)
Antihistamines and similar drugs can together with amantadine cause difficulty urinating, a ‘dry mouth’ and an increased heart rate
Drugs that increase activity or stimulation levels may increase the agitation side effect sometime seen with amantadine
Overdosing?

Irregular heart rhythm, high blood pressure, seizures and breathing problems are reported in humans who have overdosed. Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

This is just a summary of information about amantadine. If you have any questions or concerns about amantadine or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

As with all prescribed medicines, amantadine should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed. It is important to periodically discuss your pet’s response to amantadine at regular check ups. Your veterinarian will best determine if your pet is responding as expected and if your pet should continue receiving amantadine.

©North American Compendiums Inc. 2009. All rights reserved

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Amitraz Collar

General Description: An effective tick collar that kills and detaches ticks for up to 3 months. Helps protects dogs over 12 weeks of age from Lyme disease and many other tick-borne diseases. Amitraz’ ...

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General Description: An effective tick collar that kills and detaches ticks for up to 3 months. Helps protects dogs over 12 weeks of age from Lyme disease and many other tick-borne diseases. Amitraz’ activity starts within 24 hours and continues for 90 days and is not affected by rainfall. Available in 2 sizes (18 inches for dogs up to 60 lbs and 25 inches for dogs over 60 lbs).

What is this drug?

Amitraz is an antiparasitic drug
Amitraz is a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI)
Amitraz collars are worn around the dog’s neck
Reasons for prescribing:

Used to kill ticks for 3 months. This product will kill and detach ticks. Prevention will last for up to 3 months. New ticks will not attach. The active ingredient is effective within 24 hours of application.
Helps protect your dog from Lyme disease and more
This product does not kill or control flea populations
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Dogs less than 12 weeks of age
Cats
Use with caution in older, debilitated, pregnant or nursing dogs
Pets taking MAOI drugs, tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or pressor agents
Use with caution in diabetic pets
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to the amitraz or like products before
Directions:

Choose the length best suited to your dog’s size.

Wearing rubber gloves, place collar around your dog’s neck, fasten buckle and adjust for proper fit. Cut off and dispose of extra length. Collar should be tight enough that it touches skin and that the dog cannot remove it.
Wash hands with soap and water after applying the collar.

Check the collar periodically to ensure it has not loosened, and re-adjust as necessary.

Rainfall will not alter effectiveness, but remove the collar before bathing your dog. Re-apply when pet is dry.

Replace collar when effectiveness diminishes or every 3 months.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Children should not handle or play with this collar.

Call your physician immediately if you or your pet accidentally consumes this product.

Do not reuse empty pouch, box or collar. Wrap in newspaper in put in trash collection.

Human diabetics and people taking MAOI’s should use extreme caution when using amitraz.

Potential side effects:

Some dogs may be sensitive to this collar. Remove it at the first sign of irritation or adverse reactive, shampoo the dog with a non-pesticidal product and rinse well. If signs continue, contact your veterinarian immediately.
If the collar is eaten by an unattended dog, signs of intoxication will show as severe depression. Contact your veterinarian immediately.
Incoordination, slow heart rate, low body temperature, high blood sugar levels
If you notice anything unusual, remove the collar immediately and contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with fluoxetine, MAOI drugs, Mitaban Dip and meperidine.
Before using this collar in conjunction with topical flea treatments (ex. Bio Spot® Spot On, Frontline®), consult your veterinarian.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if your pet seems incoordinated, is depressed, has a slow heart rate or has decreased body temperature.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, amitraz should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This product does not kill or control flea populations.

This is just a summary of information about amitraz. If you have any questions or concerns about amitraz or about ticks, contact your veterinarian.

©North American Compendiums Inc. 2009. All rights reserved

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Ampicillin

General Description: A broad-spectrum antibiotic commonly used to treat many bacterial infections in dogs and cats (ex. skin and soft tissue infections, respiratory and urinary tract infections)....

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General Description: A broad-spectrum antibiotic commonly used to treat many bacterial infections in dogs and cats (ex. skin and soft tissue infections, respiratory and urinary tract infections). Ampicillin is available as capsules, or may be used as an injection given at your veterinary clinic.

What is this drug?

A semi-synthetic member of the penicillin class; an antibiotic
Most often given by injection at veterinary hospitals but oral forms are used
Reasons for prescribing:

Often used in: skin and soft tissue infections, respiratory infections and bladder infections in dogs and cats
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to penicillin or another antibiotic before
Use with caution in pregnant pets
Use with caution in very small animals who may be dehydrated or have kidney or heart disorders
Directions:

For liquids, shake well before accurately measuring the dose.

Give by mouth on an empty stomach, at least 1 hour before a meal or 2 hours after a meal.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian.

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. It is normally given two to four times daily, at least for 7-10 days.

Give this medication for as long as your veterinarian directs. Finish the entire course of treatment.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store powder (before reconstitution) and tablets at room temperature in a cool, dry place.

After reconstitution, refrigerated oral suspension is stable for 14 days; and stable for 7 days if kept at room temperature.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

People with allergies to penicillins or beta-lactam antibiotics should not handle this drug since allergic reactions could occur from contact.

Potential side effects:

Nausea, decreased appetite, vomiting and diarrhea may be experienced. Give the capsules or suspension with food to reduce effect.
Allergic reactions are rare, but if your pet shows irregular breathing, rash, fever, hives, scratching, puffiness or facial swelling, or anything else unusual, stop therapy and contact your veterinarian immediately.
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with aminoglycosides, cephalosporins, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, rifampin, tetracyclines and probenecid.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

This is just a summary of information about ampicillin. If you have any questions or concerns about ampicillin or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

As with all prescribed medicines, ampicillin should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

©North American Compendiums Inc. 2009. All rights reserved

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Azathioprine

General Description: Azathioprine is used to treat immune-mediated diseases or disorders (ex. hemolytic anemia, skin disease, thrombocytopenia, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease,...

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General Description: Azathioprine is used to treat immune-mediated diseases or disorders (ex. hemolytic anemia, skin disease, thrombocytopenia, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, polyarthritis, ulcerative colitis, lupus and others). It is often used in conjunction with other drugs. As this drug will suppress your pet’s natural ability to fight infection, it may be more susceptible to infections at this time.

What is this drug?

An immunosuppressive agent (purine antagonist antimetabolite)
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Used to treat conditions caused by an overactive immune system (ex. immune-mediated skin diseases, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, polyarthritis and more)
Often used in combination with other drugs to suppress the immune system
Used to prevent organ rejection post transplantation
Not often prescribed to cats due to its toxicity
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Breeding or pregnant pets
Use with caution in pets with liver disease
Use with extreme caution in cats as they are more susceptible to the toxic effects, especially bone marrow suppression and bleeding disorders
Pets with pre-existing bone marrow suppression
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to azathioprine or like products
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully. Wear gloves when handling this medication and wash your hands afterwards.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed.

Giving this medication with food may minimize GI side effects.

Dogs usually receive this medication once a day at first and then once every other day.

Cats do not often receive this drug as it affects their production of blood cells. If your veterinarian does prescribe this drug for your cat, follow the dosing instructions very carefully. Watch your cat very closely for signs of infection or bleeding.

For the first couple of months, your veterinarian will monitor your pet’s blood every 1-2 weeks.

Your pet will be more susceptible to infections. Avoid situations in which your pet may be exposed to other animals.

Results may not be seen for up to 6 weeks.

Give this medication for as long as veterinarian directs. Do not skip doses or stop giving the medication without consulting your veterinarian.

If your pet is long-term therapy, do not discontinue azathioprine abruptly, as the condition may return. Your veterinarian will advise you on a dosing schedule that will taper the drug’s dose over several months.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant , childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Reconstituted injection should be used within 24 hours.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

NB. Wear gloves while handling this medication as it can cause side effects in humans. Pregnant women should not handle this drug.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Most common side effect is bone marrow suppression. If you notice bruising, bleeding, lethargy, infection or if your pet has difficulty breathing, it may be due to anemia or a bleeding disorder. Notify your veterinarian if you notice any of these signs.
Infection: Monitor for abnormal breathing, fever, depression, lameness, diarrhea, change in urination or urine color
Vomiting, diarrhea, poor hair growth, rashes, pancreatitis (nausea, intestinal upset), liver damage (yellowing of gums, skin or eyes)
Azathioprine use may increase the risk of cancer later in your pet’s life
If you notice any of these symptoms or anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with allopurinol, modified live vaccines, pancuronium, some vitamins and supplements, succinylcholine and turbocaine
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, azathioprine should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about azathioprine. If you have any questions or concerns about azathioprine or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Benazepril hydrocloride

General Description: Benazepril is an ACE inhibitor used to dilate blood vessels in the treatment...

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General Description: Benazepril is an ACE inhibitor used to dilate blood vessels in the treatment of high blood pressure, congestive heart failure and some types of kidney disease in dogs and cats.

What is this drug?

An angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor; a vasodilator and antihypertension agent

Dilates the veins and decreases fluid retention

Given by mouth

Reasons for prescribing:

To treat high blood pressure in dogs and cats

To treat congestive heart failure in dogs and cats

To treat some kidney conditions in dogs and cats

What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

This drug will not work well in pets with severe liver disease

Pets with lupus, blood abnormalities, a history of cardiac output failure or those with low sodium levels

Use with caution in cats weighing less than 2.5 kg

Pregnant or nursing pets

If your pet has had an allergic reaction to benazepril or other ACE inhibitors

Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. It is usually givenonce daily and is usually given for the rest of the animal’s life.

Benazepril may be given with or without food. 

Give this medication for as long as veterinarian directs. Do not skip doses or stop giving the medication without consulting your veterinarian.

Heart failure patients: When benazepril is used along with a diuretic, blood work to assess kidney function should be measured prior to benazepril use, again 3-7 days later, and then periodically. Kidney function should also be rechecked after any dose change.

Call ahead for refills.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked

What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug

What are the risks and benefits of using this drug

Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products

If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever

If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever

If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever

All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.

If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet

Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Nausea, appetite loss, vomiting and diarrhea

Kidney dysfunction, which may cause increased thirst, changes in urination

Abnormally high potassium levels, which may cause weakness, slow heart rate and weak pulse

High doses can lead to very low blood pressure, which may cause weakness and collapse

If you notice any of these symptoms or if your pet’s condition worsens contact your veterinarian

Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with NSAIDS (ex. aspirin, meloxicam), potassium, potassium-sparing diuretics (ex. furosemide, spironolactone) and other vasodilators

If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.

Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

 What else should I know?

 Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

 

As with all prescribed medicines, benazepril should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

 

This is just a summary of information about benazepril. If you have any questions or concerns about benazepril or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

General Description: Benazepril is an ACE inhibitor used to dilate blood vessels in the treatment of high blood pressure, congestive heart failure and some types of kidney disease in dogs and cats.

 
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Buprenorphine

General Description: Buprenorphine is used to relieve mild to moderate pain. Buprenorphine is available as an injectable product (for use in the clinic), but it can be used at home as an oral spray...

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General Description: Buprenorphine is used to relieve mild to moderate pain. Buprenorphine is available as an injectable product (for use in the clinic), but it can be used at home as an oral spray or drop. Simply apply the drug under the tongue and it will be absorbed directly from the mouth.

What is this drug?

A potent analgesic or pain reliever
Marketed as an injectable product (for use in the clinic), it can be used at home as an oral spray or drop (applied under the tongue)
Buprenorphine is a controlled drug. Prescriptions can only be refilled up to 5 times within 6 months of the original prescription date.
Reasons for prescribing:

To treat mild to moderate pain
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Pregnant or nursing animals
Do not use in patients with head trauma, central nervous system disorders, pets with liver disease, respiratory compromise or heart failure
Use with caution in geriatric or debilitated pets, those with severe kidney disease, Addison’s disease or hypothyroidism
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to buprenorphine or other similar drugs
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. It is usually giventwo or four times a day .

Note that doses are very small for this powerful drug, so ensure that you are giving the exact prescribed amount.

Squirt the medication just under the tongue or in the cheek pouch for maximum effect.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily.

Do not allow your pet to eat aged cheese while taking buprenorphine. It may cause a dangerous rise in body temperature and blood pressure.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Sedation, and rare respiratory depression
May cause a drop in heart rate and blood pressure
If you see any significant behavior, appetite, respiratory or cardiac changes or notice anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with antihistamines or any other drug with a sedating effect, monamine oxidase inhibitors [(MAOIs), ex. Anipryl®, some tick collars/mange dips) and other pain medications
If your pet is taking a MAOI product, a 2-week waiting period is necessary before initiating treatment with buprenorphine.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, buprenorphine should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about buprenorphine. If you have any questions or concerns about buprenorphine or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Butorphanol tartrate

General Description: Butorphanol is a short-acting analgesic and cough suppressant used in dogs and cats. Low doses are useful for cough suppression while higher doses will ease pain. The injectable...

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General Description: Butorphanol is a short-acting analgesic and cough suppressant used in dogs and cats. Low doses are useful for cough suppression while higher doses will ease pain. The injectable form is often used at your veterinary hospital, but oral tablets may be used at home for pain relief. Butorphanol is a controlled substance that will require a veterinarian’s prescription.

What is this drug?

Butorphanol is a short-acting analgesic and cough suppressant
Butorphanol is given by mouth
Controlled substance (you will need a prescription from your veterinarian every 6 months for this drug)
Reasons for prescribing:

Low doses are useful for cough suppression (without causing slow or shallow breathing)
Higher doses are useful for pain relief
The injectable form is often used as a pre-anesthetic tranquilizer and also for pain relief post-surgery (rapid action, although short-lived)
Used during cancer chemotherapy to prevent nausea and vomiting
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Use cautiously or not at all in patients with liver or kidney disease, hypothyroidism, hypoadrenocorticicism (Addison’s disease), head trauma, central nervous system conditions or hydrocephalus
Use with caution in older or debilitated patients
Pregnant and nursing pets
Patients with heartworm disease
Patients with pneumonia or other respiratory conditions where a lot of mucus is produced
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to butorphanol or like products
Directions:

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is given up tothree times daily.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy.

Call ahead for refills.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Sedation, staggering
Vomiting, loss of appetite, diarrhea or constipation
Slows heart rate
Some animals become over-excited
Since butorphanol may partially reverse effects of other tranquilizers or pain relievers, discuss any other drugs you may be administering to your pet
If you notice anything unusual, discontinue use and contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with antihistamines, barbiturates, meperidine, morphine, oxymorphone, pancuronium, sedatives and tranquilizers.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet consumes more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, butorphanol should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed. It is important to periodically discuss your pet’s response to butorphanol at regular check ups. Your veterinarian will best determine if your pet is responding as expected and if your pet should continue receiving butorphanol.

This is just a summary of information about butorphanol. If you have any questions or concerns about butorphanol or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Atenolol

General Description: Atenolol is a beta-blocker used in dogs and cats to slow and regulate the heart to make it work more efficiently. It is also used to lower blood pressure and treat various heart...

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General Description: Atenolol is a beta-blocker used in dogs and cats to slow and regulate the heart to make it work more efficiently. It is also used to lower blood pressure and treat various heart diseases. Atenolol is available in bottles of 25 mg tablets or capsules.

What is this drug?

Atenolol is a beta-blocker
Atenolol is given by mouth or topically
Reasons for prescribing:

Used to treat some heart diseases (ex. irregular heart beat)
Slows and regulates the heart rate and causes the heart to work more efficiently
Used to lower blood pressure
Used to treat an enlarged heart (cats)
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Pets with heart block, bradycardia (slow heart rate) and some types of heart failure
Use with caution in diabetics or those with kidney disease
Use with caution in animals with some types of lung disease (ex. asthma)
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to atenolol or any other beta-blocker
Directions:

Atenolol may be given with or without food.

If using the transdermal gel, apply to the skin as directed by your veterinarian.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is usually given once or twice daily to dogs and once daily to cats.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

If this medication was specially compounded by a pharmacist for your pet, please be observant of the container’s expiry date.

Do not discontinue the drug abruptly or without directions from your veterinarian, as your pet’s condition may worsen.

This drug will likely need to be taken for the rest of your pet’s life. It will be very important to follow your veterinarian’s instructions regarding recheck appointments.

Call ahead for refills.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store medication in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Tiredness, difficulty exercising
Low blood pressure which would cause fainting, weakness or dizziness
Loss of appetite, nausea, diarrhea
May constrict the bronchi, causing coughing, wheezing or difficulty breathing
An improper dose can cause the heart rate to be too slow
Behavior change
Low blood sugar
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with albuterol (Ventolin), anesthetic agents, cimetidine, epinephrine, furosemide, hydralazine, insulin, metaproterenol, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (ex. aspirin, carprofen), other heart medications (digoxin, diltiazem, verapamil), phenothiazines (tranquilizers), phenylpropanolamine, prazosin and terbutaline
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, atenolol should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

It is likely that your veterinarian will want to monitor your pet’s condition periodically.

This is just a summary of information about atenolol. If you have any questions or concerns about atenolol or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Azithromycin

General Description: A macrolide antibiotic used to treat many bacterial infections in dogs and cats (ex. dermatological infections). Azithromycin is available as 250 mg and 600 mg tablets or as an...

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General Description: A macrolide antibiotic used to treat many bacterial infections in dogs and cats (ex. dermatological infections). Azithromycin is available as 250 mg and 600 mg tablets or as an oral suspension.

What is this drug?

A relatively broad spectrum macrolide antibiotic
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Useful to treat a variety of bacterial infections in dogs and cats
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to macrolide antibiotics
Use with caution in pets with liver disease
Breeding, pregnant and nursing animals (safety is unknown)
Directions:

For liquids, shake well before accurately measuring the dose.

If using the suspension, give on empty stomach.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is usually givenonce or twice daily.

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy.

Give this medication for as long as your veterinarian directs. Finish the entire course of treatment.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store unmixed oral suspension and tablets in tight, childproof containers in a dry place at room temperature. After reconstitution, multiple dose bottles should be stored at room temperature for up to 10 days and then discarded. Single dose packets should be given immediately after mixing.

Do not refrigerate oral suspension. Shake well before use.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Pet owners allergic to macrolides and/or other antibiotics should avoid handling this drug.

Potential side effects:

Vomiting, abdominal cramps and diarrhea. Contact veterinarian if pet experiences severe vomiting or diarrhea.
Liver damage (signs include yellowing of gums, skin and/or eyes)
It is important to stop therapy and contact your veterinarian immediately if you think your pet has a medical problem or side effect from this product’s therapy
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with cisapride, cyclosporine, oral antacids and pimozide.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, azithromycin should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about azithromycin. If you have any questions or concerns about azithromycin or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Bromide (Potassium)

General Description: Potassium bromide is an anticonvulsant prescribed to your dog to prevent future seizures. This dug is often used in combination with other anticonvulsants. To reduce stomach...

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General Description: Potassium bromide is an anticonvulsant prescribed to your dog to prevent future seizures. This dug is often used in combination with other anticonvulsants. To reduce stomach upset, give potassium bromide with a meal. Potassium bromide is available as tablets or as an oral solution.

What is this drug?

Potassium bromide is an anticonvulsant
Potassium bromide is given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Used in the treatment of seizures in dogs and cats
Sometimes used in combination with other anti-seizure medications, such as phenobarbital
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Use with caution in dogs with a history of pancreatitis
Some cats develop a severe asthma-like lung condition. For this reason, potassium bromide may not be a good choice for seizure control in cats.
Use with caution in pets with kidney disease, older animals and those with other health problems
Pregnant or nursing pets
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to potassium bromide or like products before
Directions:

For liquids, shake well before accurately measuring the dose.

Commonly when a dog is first prescribed potassium bromide, a higher or ‘loading’ dose is given for a short period of time to get the blood level up quickly. Follow your veterinarian’s instructions carefully to achieve the best response to the therapy and to minimize side effects. Blood levels will stabilize in 3-4 months.

To reduce the incidence of stomach upset, give with food and elevate food bowls.

If capsules are given, ensure that the dog drinks or eats afterwards to ensure the capsule ‘goes down’. Capsules getting stuck partway can cause severe irritation and damage to the throat and esophagus.

Do not give your animal any salty treats (ex. pigs’ ears) and review any diet changes with your veterinarian. Salt does not need to be restricted, but carefully controlled.

Dogs usually receive this drug once daily for the rest of their life.

Do not stop giving this medication unless directed by your veterinarian.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Give the medication at the same time daily.

Call ahead for refills.

Ensure your pet has fresh, clean drinking water at all times.

It is useful to your veterinarian for you to record and later report the date, time, severity, length and circumstances of any seizure your pet has while taking this medication.

What if dose is missed?

Missing a dose can cause a seizure. If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Pet owners allergic to potassium bromide should avoid handling this drug.

Potential side effects:

During the initial loading period, drowsiness or grogginess can be expected. If this effect is severe, lasts longer than 2-3 weeks or if the pet develops muscle pain, twitching, uneven pupils, or a behavior change, contact your veterinarian immediately. Do not give more potassium bromide to a groggy pet, even if the next dose is due
Excess thirst, drinking and urination
Giving potassium bromide with food should alleviate gastrointestinal irritation (nausea, vomiting)
Lack of appetite, rashes, diarrhea, constipation
Dogs may develop a cough (which resolves) when potassium bromide is discontinued
Bromide levels will need to be monitored periodically to ensure they are not too high
It is important to stop therapy and contact your veterinarian immediately if you think your pet has a medical problem or side effect from this product’s therapy
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with diuretics (ex. furosemide), halothane anesthesia or drugs that affect the nervous system (ex. tranquilizers).
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Overdoses are more likely from chronic overdosing than your pet consuming one large dose. Call your veterinarian immediately if you suspect an overdose (pet is exhibiting extreme drowsiness, stupor, tremors or muscle pain or other extreme symptoms).

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, potassium bromide should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed. It is important to periodically discuss your pet’s response to potassium bromide at regular check ups.

This is just a summary of information about potassium bromide. If you have any questions or concerns about potassium bromide or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Buspirone hydrochloride

General Description: Buspirone is an anti-anxiety drug used to treat various behavior disorders (ex. fears, phobias, anxieties) in pets. Buspirone will relieve anxiety with minimal sedation or muscle ...

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General Description: Buspirone is an anti-anxiety drug used to treat various behavior disorders (ex. fears, phobias, anxieties) in pets. Buspirone will relieve anxiety with minimal sedation or muscle relaxation and will not become addictive.

What is this drug?

Buspirone is an anxioltyic drug (azaperone class)
Buspirone is given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

To reduce aggression, chronic fears, phobias and anxieties
To treat inappropriate urine marking in cats
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Pets also receiving drugs known as MAO inhibitors
Use with caution in those with liver or kidney disease
Safety is unknown in pregnant or nursing animals, or in long-term use
Use with caution in working dogs as it may cause too much sedation
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to buspirone or other anti-anxiety drugs
Directions:

Buspirone may be administered in conjunction with a positive behavior modification program. It is essential to follow the training plan as well as administer the medication, to achieve therapy success.

Give this medication with or without food, although giving with food may lessen any stomach upset.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is usually giventwo or three times a day . Duration of treatment will be dependant upon the reason for and response to treatment.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

It may take 2-4 weeks before effects of the medication are noted. Single doses will not likely be effective. Not all patients respond fully to this medication.

Do not abruptly discontinue this drug. It will be necessary to slowly taper the dose over time to ensure your pet’s fears and behaviors do not return.

Using some flea and tick products can be dangerous for your pet while taking buspirone. Check with your veterinarian before using any new flea products.

Baseline and periodic blood testing may be necessary to assess the pet’s health and response to buspirone.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight. Do not remove the desiccant, if included.

Refrigerate oral suspension.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Loss of appetite, sedation, fast heartbeat, dizziness, headache, stomach upset, agitation and restlessness
Some cats become more or less affectionate. Some timid cats may show aggression.
Drowsiness and constricted pupils. Report these side effects to your veterinarian immediately.
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with furazolidone, MAOIs (ex. amitraz, deprenyl, isoniazid, selegiline), vitamins and supplements
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, buspirone should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about buspirone. If you have any questions or concerns about buspirone or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Calcitrol

General Description: Calcitrol has been prescribed to your pet to treat chronic kidney disease or low blood calcium. The product has been specially compounded for your pet as there is no...

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General Description: Calcitrol has been prescribed to your pet to treat chronic kidney disease or low blood calcium. The product has been specially compounded for your pet as there is no commercially-available product sized to fit dogs and cats.

What is this drug?

‘Active’ Vitamin D
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

To treat low blood calcium
Used in the treatment of chronic kidney disease
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Pets with high blood calcium or phosphorus levels
Pets with Vitamin D toxicosis or malabsorption syndromes
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to calcitrol or like products
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. It is usually givenonce or twice daily and may be used long-term.

May be given with or without food.

Give this medication for as long as veterinarian directs. Do not skip doses or stop giving the medication without consulting your veterinarian.

Baseline blood work to assess your pet’s health before starting this drug is recommended. Periodic blood work to monitor its effect is also advised if long-term therapy is necessary. Dose adjustments will be made based upon the results and an assessment of how your pet is responding clinically.
Call ahead for refills.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Unless otherwise labeled, store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Too high a calcium level: if your pet begins drinking a lot of water, urinates more frequently, has muscle tremors, shows weakness, depression, listlessness and/or loss of appetite, notify your veterinarian.
If you notice any of these symptoms or anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with antacids, corticosteroids, digoxin, liver enzyme inhibitors, mineral oil, phosphate binders containing calcium, thiazide diuretics, sucralfate and verapamil
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, calcitrol should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about calcitrol. If you have any questions or concerns about calcitrol or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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FIND US

Texas West Animal Health

16367 South FM 4,

Santo, TX 76472

Phone. 940-769-2222

Fax. 866-632-3365

Email. texaswestvet@gmail.com