PHARMACEUTICAL INFORMATIONS

Carprofen

General Description: Carprofen is an oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that has been prescribed to your dog to manage his/her arthritis pain and inflammation, or has been given...

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General Description: Carprofen is an oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that has been prescribed to your dog to manage his/her arthritis pain and inflammation, or has been given post-operatively to reduce pain following surgery. This medication is for use in dogs only. While carprofen is not a cure for osteoarthritis, it can relieve the pain and inflammation of osteoarthritis and improve your dog’s mobility. Response varies from dog to dog but can be quite dramatic. Carprofen is available as caplets or chewable tablets.

What is this drug?

Carprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)
Available as chewable tablets or caplets and is given to dogs by mouth.
Reasons for prescribing?

• Used to reduce pain and inflammation (soreness) due to osteoarthritis in dogs [signs include limping or lameness, decreased activity or exercise (reluctance to stand, climb stairs, jump or run, or difficulty in performing these activities), stiffness or decreased movement of joints]

• Used to reduce pain following surgery in dogs (ex. for surgeries such as spays, ear procedures or orthopedic repairs). Your veterinarian may administer Carprofen before the procedure and recommend that your dog be treated with the oral form for several days after going home.

What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

• Cats (this medication is for dogs only). Call your veterinarian immediately if your cat receives Carprofen.

• Has had an allergic reaction to Carprofen, the active ingredient of Carprofen

• Has had an allergic reaction to aspirin or other NSAIDs (for example deracoxib, etodolac, firocoxib, meloxicam, phenylbutazone or tepoxalin) such as hives, facial swelling, or red or itchy skin

Directions:

Carprofen should be given according to your veterinarian’s instructions. Your veterinarian will tell you what amount of Carprofen is right for your dog and for how long it should be given.

Carprofen should be given by mouth and may be given with or without food.

While Carprofen is not a cure for osteoarthritis, it can relieve the pain and inflammation of OA and improve your dog’s mobility. Response varies from dog to dog but can be quite dramatic.

In most dogs, improvement can be seen in a matter of days.

If Carprofen is discontinued or not given as directed, your dog’s pain and inflammation may come back.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask your veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

• The signs of OA you have observed (for example limping, stiffness)

• The importance of weight control and exercise in the management of OA

• What tests might be done before Carprofen is prescribed

• How often your dog may need to be examined by your veterinarian

• The risks and benefits of using Carprofen

Tell your veterinarian about:

• Experienced side effects from Carprofen or other NSAIDs, such as aspirin

• Digestive upset (vomiting and/or diarrhea)

• Liver or kidney disease

• A bleeding disorder (for example, von Willebrand’s disease)

• Any other medical problems or allergies that your dog has now or has had

• All medicines that you are giving your dog or plan to give your dog, including those you can get without a prescription

• If your dog is pregnant, nursing or if you plan to breed your dog

Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

For use in dogs only . Do not use in cats.

Potential side effects:

Carprofen, like other drugs, may cause some side effects. Serious but rare side effects have been reported in dogs taking NSAIDs, including Carprofen. Serious side effects can occur with or without warning and in rare situations result in death.

The most common NSAID-related side effects generally involve the stomach (such as bleeding ulcers), and liver or kidney problems. Look for the following side effects that can indicate your dog may be having a problem with Carprofen or may have another medical problem:

• Decrease or increase in appetite

• Vomiting

• Change in bowel movements (such as diarrhea, or black, tarry or bloody stools)

• Change in behavior (such as decreased or increased activity level, incoordination, seizure or aggression)

• Yellowing of gums, skin, or whites of the eyes (jaundice)

• Change in drinking habits (frequency, amount consumed)

• Change in urination habits (frequency, color, or smell)

• Change in skin (redness, scabs, or scratching)

It is important to stop therapy and contact your veterinarian immediately if you think your dog has a medical problem or side effect from Carprofen therapy. If you have additional questions about possible side effects, talk to your veterinarian.

Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Carprofen should not be given with other NSAIDs (ex. aspirin, deracoxib, etodolac, firocoxib, meloxicam, tepoxalin) or steroids (ex. cortisone, dexamethasone, prednisone, triamcinolone).

Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if your dog eats more than the prescribed amount of Carprofen.

What else should I know?

This sheet provides a summary of information about Carprofen. If you have any questions or concerns about Carprofen, or osteoarthritis, or postoperative pain, talk to your veterinarian.

As with all prescribed medicines, Carprofen should only be given to the dog for which it was prescribed. It should be given to your dog only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

It is important to periodically discuss your dog’s response to Carprofen at regular check ups. Your veterinarian will best determine if your dog is responding as expected and if your dog should continue receiving Carprofen.

To report a suspected adverse reaction to Novox, call 1-888-708-3326

To report a suspected adverse reaction to Rimadyl, call 1-800-366-5288

To report a suspected adverse reaction to Vetoprofen, call 1-800-835-9496

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Cefpodoxime Proxetil

General Description: An oral cephalosporin antibiotic used to treat many common bacterial infections in dogs and cats (ex. ear, bladder and skin infections). Typically, you only need to give...

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General Description: An oral cephalosporin antibiotic used to treat many common bacterial infections in dogs and cats (ex. ear, bladder and skin infections). Typically, you only need to give cefpodoxime once daily. Cefprodoxime is available as 100 mg and 200 mg tablets or as an oral suspension.

What is this drug?

3 rd generation cephalosporin; an antibiotic
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Useful broad spectrum antibiotic most often prescribed for common and uncomplicated infections
Especially useful against many skin infections
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Use with caution in pets with kidney failure or a history of seizures
Use with caution in breeding, pregnant or nursing animals
Pets whom have had previous allergic reactions to penicillin, other cephalosporins or antibiotics
Directions:

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. It is usually given once a day.

Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy.

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed.

Give this medication for as long as your veterinarian directs. Call ahead for refills.

For liquids, shake well before accurately measuring the dose.

May be given on a full or empty stomach.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store tablets and powder in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Once reconstituted, the oral suspension is stable for two weeks (refrigeration is recommended). Shake well before using.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Pet owners who are allergic to penicillin and/or other antibiotics should avoid handling this drug.

Potential side effects:

This medication is usually well tolerated by dogs and cats and is commonly used for several weeks
Vomiting, diarrhea and loss of appetite may be experienced
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

These drugs may interact with cefpodoxime: H 2 antagonists (ranitidine, cimetidine), omeprazole and antacids.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

As with all prescribed medicines, cefpodoxime should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

This is just a summary of information about cefpodoxime. If you have any questions or concerns about cefpodoxime or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Chlorambucil

General Description: Chlorambucil is a potent drug used in the treatment of some types of cancer....

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General Description: Chlorambucil is a potent drug used in the treatment of some types of cancer. It is also used as an immunosuppressant in some conditions where this is desired.

What is this drug?

An immunosuppressive agent
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Used in the treatment of certain types of cancer in dogs and cats (ex. lymphocytic leukemia, multiple myeloma, ovarian cancer, lymphoma)
Used in immune mediated conditions where an immunosuppressant drug can be helpful (ex. pemphigus, inflammatory bowel disease, feline infectious peritonitis, immune-mediated hemolytic anemia)
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Pregnant pets
Pets with pre-existing bone marrow suppression, those already immune suppressed (ex. FIV positive cats), or those with chronic infections
Fertility can be affected permanently in young pets
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to chlorambucil or like products
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully. Wear gloves when handling this medication.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed.

As an immunosuppressant: It is usually given once a day or once every other day.

As a cancer drug: It is usually given once a day or once every other day or every 2-3 weeks.

Give this medication for as long as veterinarian directs. Do not skip doses or stop giving the medication without consulting your veterinarian.

Baseline blood work to assess your pet’s health before starting this drug is recommended. Periodic blood work to monitor its effect is also advised if long-term therapy is necessary.

Call ahead for refills.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in the refrigerator.

NB. Wear gloves while handling this medication as it can cause side effects in humans. Pregnant women should not handle this drug.

Children may be attracted to the sugar-coating on the pill’s exterior. Be sure to keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

For 48 hours after each dose, avoid all contact with your pet’s urine, feces, saliva or vomitus. Waste should be disposed of in a sealed plastic bag.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

One or two weeks after starting therapy, if you notice bruising, bleeding, lethargy, infection or if your pet has difficulty breathing, it may be due to anemia or a bleeding disorder (a side effect due to bone marrow suppression). Notify your veterinarian if you notice any of these signs.
Poodles, Kerry Blues and other breeds may lose their hair. Delayed hair re-growth from shaved areas is possible.
Possible GI effects and skin rash
Liver failure, respiratory problems and gout have been reported
If these symptoms persist or you notice anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with allopurinol, amphotericin B, azathioprine, chloramphenicol, colchicine, corticosteroids or cyclophosphamide
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, chlorambucil should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about chlorambucil. If you have any questions or concerns about chlorambucil or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Chlorpheniramine maleate

General Description: Chlorpheniramine maleate is an affordable antihistamine that has been prescribed to your pet to treat an allergic reaction, to prevent motion sickness or as a tranquilizer. There ...

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General Description: Chlorpheniramine maleate is an affordable antihistamine that has been prescribed to your pet to treat an allergic reaction, to prevent motion sickness or as a tranquilizer. There are several other uses for this medication. Look for signs of relief within an hour. It is generally well-tolerated, but you can expect to see drowsiness. Available in 2 mg, 4 mg, 8 mg, 12 mg tablets, long-acting capsules and tablets, as well as oral syrup, injectable and as a transdermal gel.

What is this drug?

An antihistamine
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Used for acute inflammatory and allergic conditions such as: snake bites, vaccination reactions, blood transfusion reactions, bee strings and insect bites, and the management of itchy skin
Used in the treatment of mast cell tumors
Useful in the treatment of motion sickness
Sometimes used to manage feline asthma
Used in the treatment of miliary dermatitis in cats
Causes drowsiness, so may be used as a mild tranquilizer
Readily available and inexpensive
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Safety in pregnant or nursing pets is unknown
Use with caution in pets with heart disease, high blood pressure, hyperthyroidism, glaucoma, asthma, urinary obstruction, prostate disease or those with an obstruction of the pylorus
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to chlorpheniramine maleate or like products
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully. Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. It is usually giventwo or three times a day. Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily. May be given with food. Your cat may dislike the taste of this medication. A transdermal gel can be a good substitute to oral medication in some cats. If sustained release capsules are used, contents can be sprinkled on food but should not be allowed to dissolve before ingestion.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight. Do not store in the bathroom as it is sensitive to moisture. Do not freeze. Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Causes drowsiness. This effect lessens over time. Do not use in working dogs as it may cause too much sedation.
Can cause dry mouth, increased thirst, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite and inability to urinate
Cats may experience hyperexcitability or agitation
Chlorpheniramine maleate tastes bitter. Cats may tolerate this medication for a while and then show salivation and ultimately refuse medication. A different medication may be necessary at this point.
This medication interferes with allergic skin testing. Check with your veterinary dermatologist when to discontinue chlorpheniramine maleate in advance of allergy testing.
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with MAOIs, metoclopramide, oral anticoagulants (ex. heparin, warfarin), phenytoin, tranquillizers, vitamins and supplement
Human products containing antihistamines are often combined with pain relievers. These combination products should not be used in animals.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

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Clomipramine

General Description: Clomipramine is a tricyclic antidepressant used to control various behavior problems in dogs (ex. separation anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorders, etc). It is primarily used...

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General Description: Clomipramine is a tricyclic antidepressant used to control various behavior problems in dogs (ex. separation anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorders, etc). It is primarily used in dogs, but with caution may be used in cats. Best results are achieved with most behavior drugs by simultaneous use of behavior modification training. Clomipramine is available in tablet or capsule form.

What is this drug?

A tricyclic antidepressant.
Given by mouth.
Reason for prescribing

To reduce the signs of separation anxiety in dogs older than 6 months
To alleviate inappropriate barking or destructive behavior, obsessive compulsive disorders (ex. compulsive grooming, wool-sucking), dominance aggression as well as inappropriate elimination (urination or defecation)
Most often used in dogs, but may be used with caution in cats. Since a convenient dosage form is not available commercially for cats, it is often compounded at a special pharmacy.
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Dogs with known hypersensitivity to clomipramine or other tricyclic antidepressants (ex. amitriptyline).
Male breeding dogs, nursing mothers
Working dogs, as they may become too sedated to perform their duties
Use with caution in pets with a history of seizures, liver disease, cardiac disorders, glaucoma, thyroid disorders, urinary retention or reduced gastrointestinal function
Directions:

May be administered as a single daily dose or divided twice daily. Divided doses may minimize side effects and will allow patients to adapt.

To reduce the incidence of vomiting, give with a small amount of food.

Avoid feeding cheese while pet is on Clomipramine.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed.

Give this medication for as long as your veterinarian directs. Call ahead for refills.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What results should I expect?

Should be used as part of a comprehensive behavioral management program
Once desired response has been achieved, the dose may be tapered and/or discontinued as appropriate behavior has been learned
What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

Signs of the condition your pet has
When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature .

People should not take this product. Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Accidental ingestion can be considered serious. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Lethargy, depression, increase or decrease in appetite, weight gain, vomiting, diarrhea, heart irregularities, tremors, elevation in liver enzymes
Increased drinking, dry mouth (frequent licking of lips), retention of urine and/or difficulty passing urine
Increased eye pressure (glaucoma)
May alter blood glucose levels
Cats are more sensitive than dogs to tricyclic antidepressant drugs
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Incompatible with monoamine oxidase inhibitors. Do not give in combination, or within
14 days before or after treatment with these products: Anipryl®, isoniazid, Mitaban®, Preventic®, and ProMeris™ for dogs.
Use cautiously with antithyroid products, anticholergics, barbiturates, cimetidine, CNS depressants, fluoxetine, phenytoin or sympathomimetic products
Should not be given at the same time as drugs which lower the seizure threshold
Overdosing?

An overdose situation can be life-threatening. The following signs have been reported: incoordination, heart irregularities, vocalization, seizure, collapse. Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

This is just a summary of information about clomipramine. If you have any questions or concerns about clomipramine or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

As with all prescribed medicines, clomipramine should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed. It is important to periodically discuss your pet’s response to clomipramine at regular check ups. Your veterinarian will best determine if your pet is responding as expected and if your pet should continue receiving clomipramine.

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Cefadroxil

General Description: An oral cephalosporin antibiotic used to treat many common bacterial infections in dogs and cats (ex. urinary tract infections, skin and soft tissue infections). Cefadroxil is...

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General Description: An oral cephalosporin antibiotic used to treat many common bacterial infections in dogs and cats (ex. urinary tract infections, skin and soft tissue infections). Cefadroxil is available as capsules, tablets or as an oral suspension.

What is this drug?

1 st generation cephalosporin; an antibiotic
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Useful broad spectrum antibiotic most often prescribed for common and uncomplicated infections
Especially useful against skin, soft tissue and genitourinary tract infections in dogs and cats
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Use with caution in pets with kidney failure or a history of seizures
Use with caution in pregnant animals
Pets whom have had previous allergic reactions to penicillin, other cephalosporins or antibiotics
Directions:

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. It is usually given one or two times a day.

Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy.

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed.

Give this medication for as long as your veterinarian directs. Call ahead for refills.

For liquids, shake well before accurately measuring the dose.

May be given with food especially if stomach upset occurs.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store capsules and powder in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Once reconstituted, the oral suspension is stable for two weeks (refrigeration is recommended). Shake well before using.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Pet owners who are allergic to penicillin and/or other antibiotics should avoid handling this drug.

Potential side effects:

This medication is usually well tolerated by dogs and cats
Loss of appetite, vomiting and diarrhea may be experienced, but is alleviated by giving medication with food
Potential for fatigue or skin rashes in some pets
May increase blood levels if used with probenicid
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

These drugs may interact with cefadroxil: aminoglycosides (gentamicin, neomycin), amphotericin B, chloramphenicol, penicillin and probenecid.
Overdosing?

Unlikely to cause significant problems, but stomach upset is likely.

Contact your veterinarian if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Cefadroxil normally has a strong sulfurous odor which may smell like cat urine.

As with all prescribed medicines, cefadroxil should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

This is just a summary of information about cefadroxil. If you have any questions or concerns about cefadroxil or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Cephalexin

General Description: An oral cephalosporin antibiotic used to treat many common bacterial infections in dogs and cats (ex. urinary tract, skin and soft tissue, bone and respiratory tract infections). ...

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General Description: An oral cephalosporin antibiotic used to treat many common bacterial infections in dogs and cats (ex. urinary tract, skin and soft tissue, bone and respiratory tract infections). Cephalexin may be given with meals. Cephalexin is available in capsules, tablets or as an oral suspension.

What is this drug?

1 st generation cephalosporin; an antibiotic
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Useful broad spectrum antibiotic most often prescribed for common and uncomplicated infections
Especially useful against Staphylococcal infections (ex. deep skin infections)
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Use with caution in pets with kidney failure or a history of seizures
Use with caution in pregnant animals
Pets whom have had previous allergic reactions to penicillin, other cephalosporins or antibiotics
Directions:

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. It is usually given two to three times a day.

Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy.

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed.

Give this medication for as long as your veterinarian directs. Call ahead for refills.

For liquids, shake well before accurately measuring the dose.

May be given with food.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store capsules and powder in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Once reconstituted, the oral suspension is stable for two weeks (refrigeration is recommended). Shake well before using.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Pet owners who are allergic to penicillin and/or other antibiotics should avoid handling this drug.

Potential side effects:

This medication is usually well tolerated by dogs and cats and is commonly used for several months
Nausea, vomiting and diarrhea may be experienced but is alleviated by giving medication with food
Possible fever in cats. Fever in a cat is a temperature higher than 103ºF/39.5 ºC. Inform your veterinarian and another antibiotic will need to be selected.
Hyperexcitability, panting and drooling has been reported in the occasional dog
Potential for skin rashes in some pets
May increase blood levels if used with probenicid
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Cephalosporins are often used together with other antibiotics in order to cover a broad group of bacteria when the infectious agent is unknown.
These drugs may interact with cephalexin: aminoglycosides (gentamicin, neomycin), amphotericin B, chloramphenicol, oral anticoagulants (blood thinners), penicillin and probenecid.
Overdosing?

Unlikely to cause significant problems, but stomach upset is likely.

Contact your veterinarian if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Cephalexin normally has a strong sulfurous odor which may smell like cat urine.

As with all prescribed medicines, cephalexin should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

This is just a summary of information about cephalexin. If you have any questions or concerns about cephalexin or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Chloramphenicol

General Description: An oral antibiotic used to treat many common bacterial infections in dogs and cats (ex. urinary tract, skin and respiratory tract infections). Chloramphenicol may be given with...

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General Description: An oral antibiotic used to treat many common bacterial infections in dogs and cats (ex. urinary tract, skin and respiratory tract infections). Chloramphenicol may be given with or without food. Chloramphenicol is available in capsules, tablets or as an oral suspension.

What is this drug?

Chloramphenicol is a broad spectrum antibiotic
Chloramphenicol is given by mouth (eye and ear products are available as well)
Reasons for prescribing:

Useful to treat a variety of bacterial infections (ex. bladder, respiratory, skin) in dogs and cats
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Patients with abnormal bone marrow, anemia or other blood abnormalities
Patients with liver or kidney disease
Use with caution in cats due to possibility of abnormal blood cell production
Pregnant, nursing or very young animals
Newly vaccinated pets
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to chloramphenicol
Directions:

May be given on a full or empty stomach.

Read and follow the label carefully.

Some chloramphenicol tablets are enteric coated to hide the natural bitter taste. Hiding crushed tablets in the pet’s food will likely not be effective. Hand-pilling is probably your best option. After administration, watch the pet closely to ensure the entire dose was consumed.

This medication is usually given three times daily. If three times a day is inconvenient and you predict doses may be missed, another antibiotic with a less frequent administration schedule could be substituted.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy.

Give this medication for as long as your veterinarian directs. Finish the entire course of treatment.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store capsules, tablets and powder in tight, light resistant, childproof containers in a dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight. Protect the oral suspension from freezing.

People should not take this product. The FDA bans its use for humans (and food animals). Wash hands after handling this medication (wearing gloves would be ideal). Children and pregnant women should not handle this product. Avoid inhaling the powder if you crush tablets.

While your dog is undergoing treatment, wear gloves to clean up vomit, urine and feces and place all waste in a plastic bag in trash can.
Unused chloramphenicol should be returned to your veterinarian or pharmacist for proper disposal.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Pet owners allergic to chloramphenicol and/or other antibiotics should avoid handling this drug.

Potential side effects:

Decrease in appetite, vomiting, diarrhea and depression
Abnormal blood cell production (especially in cats)
Young animals may accumulate toxic levels of chloramphenicol
It is important to stop therapy and contact your veterinarian immediately if you think your pet has a medical problem or side effect from this product’s therapy
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with aminoglycosides, amoxicillin, clindamycin, cyclophosphamide, erythromycin, lincomycin, penicillins, phenobarbital, phenytoin, primidone, rifampin, streptomycin and tylosin.
May interfere with vaccinations
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, chloramphenicol should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about chloramphenicol. If you have any questions or concerns about chloramphenicol or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Cimetidine

General Description: Cimetidine is an oral histamine blocking agent used in dogs and cats to reduce the amount of stomach acid. Cimetidine aids in the treatment of gastric or duodenal ulcers, reduces ...

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General Description: Cimetidine is an oral histamine blocking agent used in dogs and cats to reduce the amount of stomach acid. Cimetidine aids in the treatment of gastric or duodenal ulcers, reduces inflammation in the esophagus and stomach and helps reduce reflux.

What is this drug?

A histamine blocking agent used to reduce the amount of gastric acid the stomach secretes and protects against formation of ulcers. Use of cimetidine has diminished as the newer drugs, ranitidine and famotidine, have fewer drug interactions and dosing is required less frequently.
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

To reduce the amount of stomach acid produced. This aids in the treatment of gastric or duodenal ulcers
Also used in the treatment of gastritis (inflammation of the stomach) and esophagitis (inflammation of the esophagus) and other reflux and hypersecretory conditions.
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

If your pet has had an allergic reaction to cimetidine or like products before
Care should be taken in older pets, those with blood abnormalities and those with liver or kidney disease
If pet is presently taking like products (unless directed by your veterinarian).
Directions:

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. It is usually giventhree or four times a day.

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give on an empty stomach if at all possible. Food will decrease its effectiveness.

Give this medication for as long as veterinarian directs. Do not skip doses or stop giving the medication without consulting your veterinarian.
Call ahead for refills.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can, regardless of feeding status. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Possible side effects:

This medication is usually well tolerated when given at recommended dosage, although cats will likely drool excessively due to the taste
When the drug is discontinued, your pet may show some confusion or headache
The animal may experience slowing of the heart rate and unsteadiness when s/he gets up
If these symptoms persist or you notice anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Drugs that may interact with cimetidine are: azathioprine (and other bone marrow suppressing drugs), benzodiazepines (ex. diazepam), beta-blockers (ex. propranolol), calcium channel blockers (ex. verapamil), ethanol, lidocaine, metronidazole, phenytoin, procainamide, quinidine, theophylline, warfarin.
Cimetidine may be given with antacids, digoxin, ketoconazole and/or metoclopramide. Whenever possible, give cimetidine at least 2 hours before or after the other drugs.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

This is just a summary of information about cimetidine. If you have any questions or concerns about cimetidine or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian. Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, cimetidine should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed. It is important to periodically discuss your pet’s response to cimetidine at regular check ups. Your veterinarian will best determine if your pet is responding as expected and if your pet should continue receiving cimetidine.

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Cyclophosphamide

General Description: Cyclophosphamide is a serious drug used to treat cancer and some diseases caused by an overactive immune system. It is often used in conjunction with other drugs. As this drug...

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General Description: Cyclophosphamide is a serious drug used to treat cancer and some diseases caused by an overactive immune system. It is often used in conjunction with other drugs. As this drug will suppress your pet’s natural ability to fight infection, it may be more susceptible to infections at this time.

What is this drug?

An immunosuppressive agent; an alkylating agent
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Used in the treatment of certain types of cancer in dogs and cats (ex. bone marrow or blood cell cancers such as lymphoma)
Used in immune-mediated conditions (ex. immune-mediated hemolytic anemia)
Often used in combination with other drugs (ex. prednisone or dexamethasone)
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Breeding males or pregnant females
Pets with a pre-existing infection
Use with caution in pets with liver or kidney disease or has had radiation in the past
Use with caution in pets with anemia, pre-existing bone marrow suppression or those on drugs which suppress the bone marrow
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to cyclophosphamide or like products
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

Tablets should not be cut or crushed, but used whole.

Give the medication in the morning. Giving cyclophosphamide with food may reduce GI upset. Encourage your pet to drink water and urinate frequently.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Dogs and cats usually receive this drug 4 days out of 7 for 6-8 weeks. Your veterinarian will want to perform frequent recheck appointments and blood work.

For the first couple of months, your veterinarian will monitor your pet’s blood every 1-2 weeks.

Your pet will be more susceptible to infections. Avoid situations in which your pet may be exposed to other animals.

Give this medication for as long as veterinarian directs. Do not skip doses.

If your pet is undergoing long-term therapy, do not discontinue azathioprine abruptly, as the condition may return. Your veterinarian will advise you on a dosing schedule that will taper the drug’s dose over several months.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant , childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

NB. Wear gloves while handling this medication as it can cause side effects in humans. Women who are pregnant, breastfeeding or trying to conceive should not handle this drug.

For 72 hours after each dose, avoid all contact with your pet’s urine, feces, saliva or vomitus. Waste should be disposed of in a sealed plastic bag.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Most common side effect is bone marrow suppression. One or two weeks after starting therapy, red and white blood cell counts may drop, causing your pet to become anemic or very susceptible to infection. Monitor for unusual bleeding or bruising, abnormal breathing, fever, depression, lameness, diarrhea, change in urination or urine color. Your veterinarian will likely want to perform blood tests every few weeks to ensure blood cell counts are safe.
Most pets do not lose their hair with chemotherapy. The exceptions are wavy-coated dogs (ex. Poodles and Old English Sheepdogs). Cats often will lose their whiskers. Hair texture may get softer.
Vomiting, diarrhea and loss of appetite
Up to 30% of dogs receiving cyclophosphamide for 2 months or more develop bloody urine. Report this to your veterinarian immediately.
Cyclophosphamide use may increase the risk of bladder cancer later in your pet’s life
Unneutered males male develop sterility
Toxic to the heart at high doses
Lung damage is possible
If you notice any of these symptoms or anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with azathioprine, digoxin, doxorubicin, methiamazole, phenobarbital, succinylcholine and thiazide diuretics
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, cyclophosphamide should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about cyclophosphamide. If you have any questions or concerns about cyclophosphamide or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Deracoxib

General Description: Deracoxib is an oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used in dogs to control pain and inflammation due to osteoarthritis. While deracoxib is not a cure for...

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General Description: Deracoxib is an oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used in dogs to control pain and inflammation due to osteoarthritis. While deracoxib is not a cure for osteoarthritis, it can control the pain and inflammation of osteoarthritis and improve your dog’s mobility. This medication may be given with or without food, although with food is preferable. Response varies but in most dogs, improvement can be dramatic. Deracoxib is available in 25 mg, 75 mg and 100 mg chewable tablets.

What is this drug?

• Deracoxib is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) of the coxib class

• Given by mouth

• Available as flavored tablets to make administration more convenient

Reasons for prescribing?

• Used to control pain and inflammation (soreness) due to osteoarthritis in dogs [signs include limping or lameness, decreased activity or exercise (reluctance to stand, climb stairs, jump or run, or difficulty in performing these activities), stiffness or decreased movement of joints]

• Fo r the control of postoperative pain and inflammation associated with bone surgery in dogs

What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

• Deracoxib should be given to dogs only

• Has had an allergic reaction to the active ingredient deracoxib

• Has had an allergic reaction (such as hives, facial swelling, or red or itchy skin)to aspirin or other NSAIDs

• Is presently taking aspirin, other NSAIDs, or corticosteroids (unless directed by your veterinarian)

• Has bloody stool or vomit

• Has a pre-existing kidney or liver condition

• Has any condition predisposing to dehydration

• Is anorexic (loss of appetite)

Directions:

Deracoxib should be given according to your veterinarian’s instructions. Your veterinarian will tell you what amount of deracoxib is right for your dog and for how long it should be given. Do not change the way you give deracoxib tablets to your dog without first speaking with your veterinarian.

Deracoxib should be given by mouth and may be given with or without food, although with food is preferable.

If deracoxib is discontinued or not given as directed by your veterinarian, your dog’s pain and inflammation may return.

While deracoxib is not a cure for osteoarthritis, it can control the pain and inflammation of osteoarthritis and improve your dog’s mobility. Response may vary from dog to dog but can be quite dramatic.

Deracoxib tablets may need to be given on a periodic basis for the animal’s lifetime. Use the lowest dose to provide adequate relief. Always consult with your veterinarian before altering the dose.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

• The orthopedic surgery your dog will undergo

• What tests might be done before surgery is performed or deracoxib tablets are prescribed

• The signs of pain or inflammation that may occur after surgery

• Normal events that can be expected after your dog undergoes surgery

• The proper amount of exercise after surgery to aid recovery

• The signs of osteoarthritis you have observed (for example, limping or stiffness)

• The importance of weight control, physical therapy and exercise in the management of osteoarthritis

• How often your dog may need to be examined by your veterinarian

• The risks and benefits of using deracoxib tablets
Tell your veterinarian about:

• Any side effects your pet has experienced from deracoxib or other NSAIDs, such as aspirin

• Any digestive upset (vomiting and/or diarrhea) your dog has had

• Any liver and kidney disease your dog has had

• A bleeding disorder (for example, Von Willebrand’s disease)

• Any other medical problems or allergies that your dog has now or has had

• All medicines that you are giving your dog or plan to give your dog, including those you can get without a prescription

• If your dog is pregnant, nursing or if you plan to breed your dog
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

For use in dogs only. People should not take deracoxib. Keep deracoxib and all medicine out of reach of children.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take deracoxib.

Potential side effects?

Deracoxib, like all other drugs, may cause some side effects in individual dogs. These are normally mild, but rare serious side effects have been reported in dogs taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) including deracoxib. Serious side effects can, in rare situations, result in death. It is important to stop the medication and contact your veterinarian immediately if you think your dog may have a medical problem or side effect while on deracoxib. If you have additional questions about possible side effects, talk with your veterinarian or call 1-800-332-2761.

Look for the following side effects that may indicate that your dog is having a problem with deracoxib or may have another medical problem:

• Vomiting

• Change in bowel movements such as diarrhea or change in stool color

• Change in drinking or urination

• Decrease in appetite

• Change in behavior, such as depression or restlessness

Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Deracoxib should not be given with other NSAIDs (ex. aspirin, carprofen or etodolac) or corticosteroids (ex. prednisone).

Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if your dog eats more than the prescribed amount of deracoxib.

What else should I know?

This sheet provides a summary of information about deracoxib. If you have any questions or concerns about deracoxib, postoperative orthopedic pain and inflammation, or osteoarthritis, talk to your veterinarian.

As with all prescribed medicines, deracoxib should only be given to the dog for which it was prescribed. It should be given to your dog only for the condition for which it was prescribed. It is important to periodically discuss your dog’s response to deracoxib at regular check ups.

Your veterinarian will best determine if your dog is responding as expected and if your dog should continue receiving deracoxib.

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Digoxin

General Description: Digoxin is used to treat pets with congestive heart failure or heart rhythm disturbances. It will help the heart beat more strongly and regularly, and moves blood through the...

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General Description: Digoxin is used to treat pets with congestive heart failure or heart rhythm disturbances. It will help the heart beat more strongly and regularly, and moves blood through the body better, thereby reducing fluid buildup in the lungs.

What is this drug?

A cardiac glycoside; it slows down the heart rate and increases the contraction strength of the heart
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

For the initial and chronic treatment of heart failure
For the control of various irregular heart beats (atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter)
Occasionally used to treat dilated cardiomyopathy
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Pets with ventricular fibrillation or digitalis overdose
Cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
Use with caution in Collie-breed dogs as they may be more sensitive to Central Nervous System effects
Use with caution in obese pets and those with kidney or thyroid disease, severe lung disease or those with an electrolyte imbalance
Safety has not been determined in breeding, pregnant or nursing animals
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to digoxin or like products
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully. Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed.

Initial doses are often low, and increased gradually to a maintenance dose based upon blood levels and effects. Carefully follow your veterinarian’s directions as to dosage and the need to monitor signs and check blood levels.

Dogs usually receive this drug two times a day.

Cats usually receive this drug once daily or once every 2 nd or 3 rd day. Do not give with food.

Give on an empty stomach. Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily.

Ensure your pet has access to plenty of fresh, clean drinking water.

As the difference between the treatment dose and the dose that causes side effects is so small, do not adjust medication without contacting your veterinarian first.

Do not skip doses or stop giving the medication without consulting your veterinarian. Stopping suddenly can make the heart condition worse.

Baseline blood work is suggested to assess your pet’s general health prior to initiating treatment.

Periodic blood work to monitor this drug’s effect will be required. Blood is drawn 4-10 hours after the dose is given. Schedule your appointment accordingly.

Differences exist between various brands and forms (ie. tablets vs. capsules). If there is a need to change, your veterinarian may need to monitor your pet closely, recheck blood levels and adjust dosing accordingly.

Call ahead for refills.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time. Contact your veterinarian if you miss giving doses two or more days in a row.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Not for human use.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Digoxin is used less frequently now that there are less toxic drugs available
Cats can be more sensitive to side effects than dogs
Potential complications include fatal abnormal heart rhythms and kidney failure
Most side effects are due to too much digoxin in the bloodstream and can be very serious. Watch for mild gastrointestinal effects (decreased appetite, vomiting, diarrhea), to fatigue, changes in urination, weight loss or behavior changes to serious heart rhythm abnormalities. Contact your veterinarian if your pet develops any of these symptoms or your pet’s heart condition seems to worsen.
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with amphotericin B, antacids, anticholinergics, beta-blockers (ex. atenolol), calcium channel blocker (ex. diltiazem), chemotherapeutics, cimetidine, corticosteroids, diazepam, diuretics, erythromycin, laxatives, metoclopramide, neomycin, penicillamine, quinidine, succinylcholine, tetracycline, thyroid replacement therapy drugs and verapamil
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, digoxin should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about digoxin. If you have any questions or concerns about digoxin or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Diltiazem

General Description: Diltiazem, a calcium channel blocker, is used to treat various heart conditions (high blood pressure, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and certain rhythm abnormalities). Diltiazem...

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General Description: Diltiazem, a calcium channel blocker, is used to treat various heart conditions (high blood pressure, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and certain rhythm abnormalities). Diltiazem decreases the heart’s need for blood and oxygen, reducing the amount of work the heart must do. It also helps the heart beat more regularly. Tablets are available in 4 strengths: 30, 60, 50 and 120 mg.

What is this drug?

Diltiazem is a calcium channel blocker
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Used to treat high blood pressure, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (cats) and some rhythm abnormalities (atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter and supraventricular tachycardia)
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Since the liver and kidneys removes this drug from the system, patients with liver or kidney disease will have dosages monitored carefully
Pets who already have very low blood pressure, ‘AV block’, or lung congestion
Breeding, pregnant or nursing pets
Used with caution in geriatric patients or those with a history of heart failure
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to diltiazem or like products
Directions:

Diltiazem may be given with or without food.

If using the transdermal gel, apply to the skin as directed by your veterinarian.

The regular form of this medication is usually given three times a day . A long-acting form may be recommended for the convenience of once or twice daily dosing.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. If you have difficulty giving the medication, contact your veterinarian.

Frequently diltiazem is given with other drugs, especially in pets undergoing treatment for heart failure or arrhythmias.

The duration of administration depends on the condition being treated, response to the medication and the development of any adverse effects. Be certain to complete the prescription unless specifically directed by your veterinarian. Even if your pet feels better, the entire treatment should be completed to prevent relapse.

Dilacor® capsules: Contains a given amount of long acting medication within the capsule. Your veterinarian or pharmacist will instruct you how to open the capsule and administer the medication within.

Cardizem® capsules: Contains a fixed amount of long and immediate-acting ‘beads’. Your veterinarian or pharmacist will instruct you how to open the capsule and measure and administer the medication within.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

Call ahead for refills.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Refrigerate oral suspension. Store other forms in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Slow heart rate
Vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, low blood pressure, irregular heart rate, rashes and abnormal liver tests, effects on the central nervous system
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but it is may interact with atenolol, cimetidine, cyclosporine, digoxin, propranolol, quinidine, ranitidine and theophylline
Use with care in animals also receiving other potent cardiovascular drugs (ex. diuretics, vasodilators)
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, diltiazem should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about diltiazem. If you have any questions or concerns about diltiazem or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Doxycycline

General Description: Doxycycline is an oral tetracycline antibiotic used in dogs and cats to treat many bacterial infections, especially those carried by ticks. To reduce stomach upset, give...

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General Description: Doxycycline is an oral tetracycline antibiotic used in dogs and cats to treat many bacterial infections, especially those carried by ticks. To reduce stomach upset, give doxycycline with a meal. Doxycycline is available as tablets, capsules, oral suspension or as an injection. A gel formula is also used after some dental procedures.

What is this drug?

A tetracycline antibiotic
Given by mouth or as a dental preparation
Reasons for prescribing:

Useful to treat a variety of bacterial infections in dogs and cats including leptospirosis, toxoplasmosis and many diseases carried by ticks
Gel formulation is used in dogs after dental surgery to fight bacteria causing periodontal disease
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to doxycycline or other antibiotics
Use with caution in pregnant females
Nursing females and young animals
Directions:

For liquids, shake well before accurately measuring the dose.

Give with food to reduce the incidence of vomiting.

When pilling cats, ensure that the medication is followed by at least a teaspoon of water or a favorite liquid (tuna water). Do not ‘dry-pill’.

Give doxycycline 1-2 hours before or after any supplements or medications containing aluminum, calcium, magnesium or zinc.

Give doxycycline 3 hours before or 2 hours after any oral iron supplements or medications.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is usually givenonce or twice daily .

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy.

Finish the entire course of treatment.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store capsules and tablets in tight, light resistant, childproof containers in a dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

After reconstitution, the oral suspension is stable for 14 days at room temperature. Do not refrigerate.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Pet owners allergic to doxycycline and/or other antibiotics should avoid handling this drug.

Potential side effects:

Decrease in appetite, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Contact your veterinarian if pet experiences severe vomiting or diarrhea.
Bone and teeth abnormalities in young animals are less likely with doxycycline than other tetracyclines
Damage to esophagus in cats from ‘dry-pilling’. Ensure cat eats or drinks after receiving capsule or tablet form
Superinfections have occurred in long-term tetracycline therapy
Skin sensitivities (pustules or blisters on skin exposed to sun). Use caution when exposing pet to sunlight.
Reported cases in human medicine of liver conditions and blood abnormalities
It is important to stop therapy and contact your veterinarian immediately if you think you pet has a medical problem or side effect from this product’s therapy
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with aminogylcosides, barbiturates, bismuth, carbamezine, cephalosporins, kaolin, digoxin, insulin, laxatives, medications/supplements containing aluminum, calcium, iron, magnesium and/or zinc, oral antacids, oral sodium bicarbonate, pectin, penicillins, theophylline, and warfarin.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

Dogs prescribed Doxirobe Oral Gel should not have teeth brushed for 2 weeks following application.

As with all prescribed medicines, doxycycline should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about doxycycline. If you have any questions or concerns about doxycycline or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Erythromycin

General Description: Erythromycin is an oral macrolide antibiotic used to treat various bacterial infections in dogs and cats (ex. soft tissue infections). Erythromycin may be prescribed for other...

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General Description: Erythromycin is an oral macrolide antibiotic used to treat various bacterial infections in dogs and cats (ex. soft tissue infections). Erythromycin may be prescribed for other reasons. Give with food to decrease stomach upset. Erythromycin is available in different strengths as an oral suspension, as capsules or coated tablets. Topical and ophthalmic preparations are also available.

What is this drug?

Erythromycin is a macrolide antibiotic
Erythromycin is given by mouth (eye and topical products are available as well)
Reasons for prescribing:

Useful to treat a variety of bacterial infections in dogs and cats
Used as a prokinetic agent: low doses are given to relieve nausea, stimulate movement of the stomach and intestines, treat reflux esophagitis
Because it prevents certain liver enzymes to break down some drugs, it can be used to increase blood levels and lower the dose of an expensive drug called cyclosporine (given at same time)
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to erythromycin or other antibiotics
Pets with liver disease
Pregnant animals
Directions:

For liquids, shake well before accurately measuring the dose.

Give this medication with food to decrease likelihood of stomach upset.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is usually given two or three times daily. If three times a day is inconvenient and you predict doses may be missed, another antibiotic with a less frequent administration schedule could be substituted.

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy.

Give this medication for as long as your veterinarian directs. Finish the entire course of treatment. Call ahead for refills.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store capsules and tablets in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

To retain palatability, the oral suspension should be refrigerated (although most suspension brands are stable at room temperature for 14 days).

Drug is toxic to guinea pigs, hamsters, rabbits and gerbils . Not safe for use in cattle or adult horses.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Pet owners allergic to erythromycin and/or other antibiotics should avoid handling this drug.

Potential side effects:

Decrease in appetite, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea
When used as a prokinetic agent, it may increase intestinal distress as larger food particles than normal may empty into intestine
It is important to stop therapy and contact your veterinarian immediately if you think your pet has a medical problem or side effect from this product’s therapy
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with azithromycin, chloramphenicol, clindamycin, digoxin, lincomycin, methylprednisolone, rifampin, sulfa class antibiotics, theophylline, tylosin and warfarin.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, erythromycin should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about erythromycin. If you have any questions or concerns about erythromycin or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Difloxacin

General Description: Difloxacin is an oral fluoroquinolone antibiotic used to treat various bacterial infections in dogs and cats (ex. wounds and abscesses, urinary tract infections). Difloxacin...

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General Description: Difloxacin is an oral fluoroquinolone antibiotic used to treat various bacterial infections in dogs and cats (ex. wounds and abscesses, urinary tract infections). Difloxacin should be given on an empty stomach. Difloxacin is available in three different tablet strengths.

What is this drug?

Difloxacin is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Often used in: bladder, skin and soft tissue infections (wounds and abscesses)
May be a better choice than other fluorquinolones in dogs with moderate to severe kidney disease
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Not an approved drug for cats
Young, growing animals due to potential for cartilage abnormalities
Use with caution in animals with liver or kidney conditions, or those suffering dehydration
Breeding, pregnant or nursing animals
Pets who have a history of seizures or other central nervous system disorders
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to other quinolones
Directions:

Give on an empty stomach unless medication upsets stomach.

Give difloxacin 2 hours before or after any iron, dairy or calcium products.

Ensure there is water available for your pet to drink.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is usually given once daily.

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy. Finish the entire course of treatment.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store tablets in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Pet owners who are allergic to quinolones (such as ciprofloxacin or norfloxacin) should avoid handling this drug as a photosensitivity reaction could occur with contact.

Potential side effects:

Nausea, vomiting (cats)
Decreased appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, anal irritation (dogs)
Damage to joint cartilage in dogs <8 months="" of="">
Urine crystals in dehydrated pets
May worsen existing obsessive behaviors
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with aminoglycosides, antacids, 3rd generation cephalosporins, clindamycin, nitrofurantoin, oral cyclosporine, probenecid, sucralfate, theophylline and medications (including multivitamins) containing aluminum, calcium, iron, magnesium and zinc.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, difloxacin should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about difloxacin. If you have any questions or concerns about difloxacin or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Dihydrotachysterol

General Description: This medication is used to help regulate blood calcium due to low parathyroid...

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General Description: This medication is used to help regulate blood calcium due to low parathyroid function or kidney failure. Available in tablets, capsules and oral solution.

What is this drug?

A Vitamin D analog
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

To treat low blood calcium in patients with hypoparathyroidism or severe kidney disease
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Pets with high blood calcium or phosphorus levels
Pets with Vitamin D toxicosis
Use with caution in pets with kidney disease not associated with hypocalcemia
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to dihydrotachysterol before
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. It is usually givenonce daily and may be used long-term.

Give this medication for as long as veterinarian directs. Do not skip doses or stop giving the medication without consulting your veterinarian.

Initially, blood work to assess calcium levels will need to be performed several times a day. For pets receiving long-term therapy, calcium levels will need to be monitored 2-4 times/year.
Call ahead for refills.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Too high a calcium level: if your pet begins drinking a lot of water, urinates more frequently, has muscle tremors, shows weakness, depression, listlessness and/or loss of appetite, notify your veterinarian.
If you notice any of these symptoms or anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with antacids, corticosteroids, digoxin, liver enzyme inhibitors, mineral oil, thiazide diuretics, sucralfate and verapamil
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, dihydrotachysterol should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about dihydrotachysterol. If you have any questions or concerns about dihydrotachysterol or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Diphenhydramine

General Description : Diphenhydramine is an affordable antihistamine that has been prescribed to your pet to treat an allergic reaction to drugs or an environmental allergen, to prevent motion...

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General Description : Diphenhydramine is an affordable antihistamine that has been prescribed to your pet to treat an allergic reaction to drugs or an environmental allergen, to prevent motion sickness or as a tranquilizer. There are several other uses for this medication. It is generally well-tolerated, but you can expect to see drowsiness. Available over-the counter (OTC) in many forms: 25 mg capsules or minitabs, 12.5 mg chewable tablets; 50 mg capsules or tablets, oral elixir and syrup.

What is this drug?

An antihistamine
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Used for acute inflammatory and allergic conditions such as: snake bites, vaccination reactions, blood transfusion reactions, bee strings and insect bites, and the management of itchy skin
Used in the treatment of mast cell tumors
Useful in the treatment of motion sickness
Causes drowsiness, so may be used as a mild tranquilizer
Readily available and inexpensive
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Safety in pregnant or nursing pets is unknown
Use with caution in pets with heart disease, high blood pressure, hyperthyroidism, glaucoma, asthma, urinary obstruction, prostate disease or those with an obstruction of the pylorus
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to diphenhydramine or like products
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. It is usually givenup to three times daily. Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily.

Shake liquids before using and measure the dose carefully.

Slow-release capsules should not be mixed or dissolved in food.

Do not give sinus or cold medications containing diphenhydramine to your pet. They can be lethal to your pet.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Some oral liquids contain alcohol. Do not use these formulations in your pet.

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight. Do not store in the bathroom as it is sensitive to moisture. Do not allow the liquids to freeze.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Causes drowsiness. This effect lessens over time. Do not use in working dogs as it may cause too much sedation.
Can cause dry mouth, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite and inability to urinate
Cats may experience hyperexcitability or agitation
Diphenhydramine tastes terrible. Getting cats to accept it can be quite a challenge.
This medication interferes with allergic skin testing. Check with your veterinary dermatologist when to discontinue diphenhydramine in advance of allergy testing.
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with epinephrine, MAOIs, metoclopramide, oral anticoagulants (ex. heparin, warfarin) and tranquillizers
Human products containing antihistamines are often combined with pain relievers. These combination products should not be used in animals.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, diphenhydramine should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about diphenhydramine. If you have any questions or concerns about diphenhydramine or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Enrofloxacin

General Description: Enrofloxacin is an oral fluoroquinolone antibiotic used to treat various bacterial infections in dogs and cats (ex. urinary tract, respiratory, skin and soft tissue infections)....

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General Description: Enrofloxacin is an oral fluoroquinolone antibiotic used to treat various bacterial infections in dogs and cats (ex. urinary tract, respiratory, skin and soft tissue infections). Enrofloxacin should be given on an empty stomach. Enrofloxacin is available in tablets and ‘taste tabs’ in several different strengths.

What is this drug?

Enrofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Often used in: bladder, ear, respiratory, skin and soft tissue infections
Effective against many bacteria types with fewer side effects than aminoglycoside type of antibiotics
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Young, growing animals due to potential for cartilage abnormalities
Use with caution in animals with liver or kidney conditions, or those suffering dehydration
Should not be used at high doses in cats (may cause blindness)
Breeding, pregnant or nursing animals
Pets who have a history of seizures or other central nervous system disorders
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to other quinolones and/or sulfonamides
Directions:

Enrofloxacin tablets are enteric coated to hide the natural bitter taste. Hiding crushed tablets in the pet’s food will likely not be effective. Flavored tabs are available as a more palatable alternative. After administration, watch the pet closely to ensure the entire dose was consumed.

Give on an empty stomach.

Give enrofloxacin 2 hours before or after any iron, dairy or calcium products.

Ensure there is water available for your pet to drink.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is usually given one or two times daily.

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy. Finish the entire course of treatment.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store tablets in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

People should not take this drug. Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Pet owners who are allergic to quinolones (such as ciprofloxacin or norfloxacin) should avoid handling this drug as a photosensitivity reaction could occur with contact.

Potential side effects:

Nausea, vomiting and diarrhea (dogs/cats on high doses)
Excessive thirst, decrease in appetite
Damage to joint cartilage in dogs <8 months="" of="">
Urine crystals in dehydrated pets
May worsen existing obsessive behaviors
Rare incidences of dizziness, seizures, depression, lethargy and nervousness
Rare incidences in cats of vocalizing, aggression and dilated pupils
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with aminoglycosides, antacids, 3rd generation cephalosporins, clindamycin, nitrofurantoin, oral cyclosporine, probenecid, sucralfate, theophylline and medications containing aluminum, calcium, iron and magnesium.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, enrofloxacin should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about enrofloxacin. If you have any questions or concerns about enrofloxacin or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Etodolac

General Description: Etodolac is an oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used in dogs to reduce pain and inflammation due to osteoarthritis. This medication may be given with or without...

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General Description: Etodolac is an oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used in dogs to reduce pain and inflammation due to osteoarthritis. This medication may be given with or without food. Response varies but in most dogs, improvement will be seen in a few days. Etodolac is available as 150 mg and 300 mg tablets.

What is this drug?

• Etodolac is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)

• Given to dogs by mouth

Reasons for prescribing?

• Used to reduce pain and inflammation (soreness) due to osteoarthritis in dogs [signs include limping or lameness, decreased activity or exercise (reluctance to stand, climb stairs, jump or run, or difficulty in performing these activities), stiffness or decreased movement of joints]

What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

• Cats (this medication is for dogs only). Call your veterinarian immediately if your cat receives etodolac

• Has had an allergic reaction to the active ingredient etodolac

• Has had an allergic reaction to aspirin or other NSAIDs (for example, carprofen or phenylbutazone) such as hives, facial swelling, or red or itchy skin

Directions:

Etodolac should be given according to your veterinarian’s instructions. Your veterinarian will tell you what amount of etodolac is right for your dog and for how long it should be given.

Etodolac should be given by mouth and may be given with or without food.

While etodolac is not a cure for osteoarthritis, it can relieve the pain and inflammation of OA and improve your dog’s mobility.

Response varies from dog to dog but can be quite dramatic.

In most dogs, improvement can be seen in a matter of days.

If etodolac is discontinued or not given as directed, your dog’s pain and inflammation may return.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

• The signs of OA you have observed (for example, limping, stiffness)

• The importance of weight control and exercise in the management of OA

• What tests might be done before etodolac is prescribed

• How often your dog may need to be examined by your veterinarian

• The risks and benefits of using etodolac
Tell your veterinarian about:

• Experienced side effects from etodolac or other NSAIDs, such as aspirin

• Digestive upset (vomiting and/or diarrhea)

• Liver and kidney disease

• A bleeding disorder (for example, Von Willebrand’s disease)

• Any other medical problems or allergies that your dog has now or has had

• All medicines that you are giving your dog or plan to give your dog, including those you can get without a prescription

• If your dog is pregnant, nursing or if you plan to breed your dog

Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

For use in dogs only. Do not use in cats.

People should not take etodolac. Keep etodolac and all medicine out of reach of children.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take etodolac.

Potential side effects?

Etodolac, like other drugs, may cause some side effects. Serious but rare side effects have been reported in dogs taking NSAIDs, including etodolac. Serious side effects can occur with or without warning and in rare situations result in death.

The most common NSAID-related side effects generally involve the stomach (such as bleeding ulcers), and liver or kidney problems. Look for the following side effects that can indicate your dog may be having a problem with etodolac or may have another medical problem:

• Decrease or increase in appetite

• Vomiting

• Change in bowel movements (such as diarrhea, or black, tarry or bloody stools)

• Change in behavior (such as decreased or increased activity level, incoordination, seizure or aggression)

• Yellowing of gums, skin, or whites of the eyes (jaundice)

• Change in drinking habits (frequency, amount consumed)

• Change in urination habits (frequency, color, or smell)

• Change in skin (redness, scabs, or scratching)

It is important to stop therapy and contact your veterinarian immediately if you think your dog has a medical problem or side effect from etodolac therapy. If you have additional questions about possible side effects, talk to your veterinarian.

Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Etodolac should not be given with other NSAIDs (for example, aspirin, carprofen) or steroids (for example, cortisone, prednisone, dexamethasone, triamcinolone).

Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if your dog eats more than the prescribed amount of etodolac.

What else should I know?

This sheet provides a summary of information about etodolac. If you have any questions or concerns about etodolac or osteoarthritis pain, talk to your veterinarian.

As with all prescribed medicines, etodolac should only be given to the dog for which it was prescribed. It should be given to your dog only for the condition for which it was prescribed. It is important to periodically discuss your dog’s response to etodolac at regular check ups.

Your veterinarian will best determine if your dog is responding as expected and if your dog should continue receiving etodolac.

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FIND US

Texas West Animal Health

16367 South FM 4,

Santo, TX 76472

Phone. 940-769-2222

Fax. 866-632-3365

Email. texaswestvet@gmail.com