PHARMACEUTICAL INFORMATIONS

Famotidine

General Description: Famotidine is used in dogs and cats to reduce the amount of stomach acid produced, and to treat and protect against gastric ulcers. It is also used to treat inflammation of, or...

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General Description: Famotidine is used in dogs and cats to reduce the amount of stomach acid produced, and to treat and protect against gastric ulcers. It is also used to treat inflammation of, or reflux from, the stomach and esophagus. Famotidine is available in 10 mg, 20 mg and 40 mg tablets as well as an oral powder/liquid.

What is this drug?

An H2 receptor agonist
Injectable forms can be given in the veterinary clinic, but there are several forms that can be given by mouth at home
Reasons for prescribing:

Used to reduce the amount of stomach acid produced, plus to treat ulcers and protect against ulcer formation
Used in the treatment of gastritis and esophagitis (inflammation of the stomach and esophagus, respectively)
Used to treat gastric and esophageal reflux
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Use during pregnancy can affect weight gain. Use with caution.
Avoid use of famotidine if your pet is nursing puppies/kittens
Use with caution in older pets or those with heart, liver or kidney disease
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to famotidine or like products before
Directions:

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. It is usually given once or twice a day .

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give on an empty stomach if at all possible. Food will decrease its effectiveness.

Give this medication for as long as veterinarian directs. Do not skip doses or stop giving the medication without consulting your veterinarian.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Famotidine tablets should be stored in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Famotidine oral liquids should be refrigerated.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Possible side effects:

This medication is usually well tolerated
Possible loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea and fatigue
May have a temporary increase in stomach acid production when famotidine is discontinued
May decrease white blood cell count, especially if your pet is also receiving other bone marrow suppressing drugs (ex. azathioprine)
Intravenous use in cats may cause red blood cell damage
If these symptoms persist or you notice anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with antacids, digoxin, ketoconazole, itraconazole, metoclopramide, sucralfate, vitamins and supplements.
Give famotidine 2 hours before or after other medications
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, famotidine should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

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Firocoxib

General Description: Firocoxib is an oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used in dogs to control pain and inflammation due to osteoarthritis. While firocoxib is not a cure for...

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General Description: Firocoxib is an oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used in dogs to control pain and inflammation due to osteoarthritis. While firocoxib is not a cure for osteoarthritis, it can control the pain and inflammation of osteoarthritis and improve your dog’s mobility. This medication may be given with or without food. Response varies but in most dogs, improvement will be seen in a few days. Firocoxib is available in 57 mg and 227 mg chewable tablets.

What is this drug?

• Firocoxib is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)

• Given to dogs by mouth

Reasons for prescribing?

• Used to control pain and inflammation (soreness) due to osteoarthritis in dogs [signs include limping or lameness, decreased activity or exercise (reluctance to stand, climb stairs, jump or run or difficulty in performing these activities), stiffness or decreased movement of joints]

What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

• Cats (this medication is for dogs only). Call your veterinarian immediately if your cat receives firocoxib

• Has had an allergic reaction to the active ingredient firocoxib

• Has had an allergic reaction (such as hives, facial swelling, or red or itchy skin) to aspirin or other NSAIDS

• Is presently taking aspirin, other NSAIDs, or corticosteroids (unless directed by your veterinarian)

• Dogs that weigh under seven pounds in body weight

Directions:

Firocoxib should be given according to your veterinarian’s instructions. Do not change the way you give firocoxib to your dog without first speaking with your veterinarian. Your veterinarian will tell you what amount of firocoxib is right for your dog and for how long it should be given.

Most dogs will take the chewable tablets from your hand, or you can place the tablet in your dog’s mouth.

Firocoxib may be given with or without food.

While firocoxib is not a cure for osteoarthritis, it can control the pain and inflammation of OA and improve your dog’s mobility.

Response will vary from dog to dog but can be quite dramatic.

In most dogs, improvement can be seen in a matter of days.

If firocoxib is discontinued or not given as directed, your dog’s pain and inflammation may come back.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask your veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

• The signs of OA you have observed (for example, limping, stiffness)

• The importance of weight control and exercise in the management of OA

• What tests might be done before firocoxib is prescribed

• How often your dog may need to be examined by your veterinarian.

• The risks and benefits of using firocoxib.

Tell your veterinarian about:

• Experienced side effects from firocoxib or other NSAIDs, such as aspirin

• Digestive upset (vomiting and/or diarrhea)

• Liver or kidney disease

• A bleeding disorder (for example, Von Willebrand’s disease)

• Any other medical problems or allergies that your dog has now or has had

• All medicines that you are giving your dog or plan to give your dog, including those you can get without a prescription

• If your dog is pregnant, nursing or if you plan to breed your dog

Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

For use in dogs only . Do not use in cats.

Potential side effects?

Firocoxib, like other NSAIDS, may cause some side effects. Serious side effects associated with NSAID therapy in dogs can occur with or without warning, and in rare situations, result in death (when doses above the recommended dose were used in puppies less than seven months of age).

The most common side effects associated with firocoxib therapy involve the digestive tract (vomiting and decreased food consumption). Liver or kidney problems have also been reported with NSAIDs.

Look for the following side effects that may indicate your dog is having a problem with firocoxib or may have another medical problem:

• Decrease or increase in appetite

• Vomiting

• Change in bowel movements (such as diarrhea, or black, tarry or bloody stools)

• Change in behavior (such as decreased or increased activity level, incoordination, seizure, or aggression)

• Yellowing of gums, skin, or whites of the eyes (jaundice)

• Change in drinking habits (frequency or amount consumed)

• Change in urination habits (frequency, color or smell)

• Change in skin (redness, scabs, or scratching)

• Unexpected weight loss

It is important to stop therapy and contact your veterinarian immediately if you think your dog has a medical problem or side effect while taking firocoxib tablets.

Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Firocoxib should not be given with other NSAIDs (for example, aspirin, carprofen, etodolac, deracoxib, firocoxib, or tepoxalin) or corticosteroids (for example, prednisone, cortisone, dexamethasone, or triamcinolone).

Overdosing?

Consult your veterinarian immediately if your dog eats more than the prescribed amount of firocoxib.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, firocoxib tablets should only be given to the dog for which they were prescribed. They should be given to your dog only for the condition for which they were prescribed, at the prescribed dose.

It is important to periodically discuss your dog’s response to firocoxib tablets. Your veterinarian will determine if your dog is responding as expected and if your dog should continue receiving firocoxib tablets.

This is just a summary of information about firocoxib tablets. If you have any questions or concerns about firocoxib or osteoarthritis pain, talk with your veterinarian.

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Fludrocortisone

General Description: Used in the treatment of Addison’s disease and is also used to regulate the body’s potassium level. Tablets are usually given once daily for the life of the pet. Fludrocortisone...

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General Description: Used in the treatment of Addison’s disease and is also used to regulate the body’s potassium level. Tablets are usually given once daily for the life of the pet. Fludrocortisone is available in 0.1 mg tablets.

What is this drug?

A mineralocorticoid; a steroid
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

For the treatment of hypoadrenocorticism (Addison’s disease) in dogs. Addison’s is not often diagnosed in cats.
Helps to regulate the body’s concentrations of sodium and potassium
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Safe for use during pregnancy. Since the drug enters the milk, any mothers prescribed this drug should not nurse their puppies. Use a milk replacer to feed the puppies once they have received colostrum (first milk).
Pets with serious bacterial, fungal or viral infections
Pets with stomach ulcers, hypothyroidism, diabetes, liver, heart and kidney disease
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to fludrocortisone or like products
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. It is usually givenonce daily for the life of the pet. It is rarely given to cats. Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

Fludrocortisone may be given with food to reduce gastrointestinal side effects.

Give this medication for as long as veterinarian directs. Do not skip doses or stop giving the medication without consulting your veterinarian.

Baseline blood work to assess your pet’s health before starting this drug is recommended. Periodic blood work to monitor its effect is also advised if long-term therapy is necessary. Dose adjustments will be made based upon the results and an assessment of how your pet is responding clinically.

Do not discontinue the drug abruptly if your pet has been on the drug for several weeks. Your veterinarian will want to gradually reduce the dosage before stopping this medication.

Ensure your pet has fresh, clean drinking water at all times.

Call ahead for refills.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Most common side effects are increased thirst, urination, fluid accumulation in the limbs, weakness, problems with diabetes control, increased appetite and weight gain. Your pet may have accidents and need to go outside more often.
May be irritating to the stomach. Give fludrocortisone with food to alleviate this effect.
Some effects can occur if the dose is increased or decreased too quickly. Effects could include: high blood pressure, limb swelling, low potassium levels and weakness. If your pet seems weak or its legs appear swollen, call your veterinarian immediately.
Heart enlargement can occur with chronic overdosing
May lead to immune system suppression, making your pet more susceptible to infections. Contact your veterinarian if your pet has a fever (over 103ºF), painful or frequent urination, fatigue, sneezing, coughing or runny eyes.
If you notice any of these symptoms or anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with anticholinesterase agents, amphotericin B, anticoagulants, barbiturates, cyclosporine, digoxin, erythromycin, furosemide, glipizide, insulin, ketoconazole, macrolid antibiotics, NSAIDs, salicylate (aspirin products), phenobarbital, phenytoin, rifampin, theophylline and some vaccines.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, fludrocortisone should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about fludrocortisone. If you have any questions or concerns about fludrocortisone or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Furosemide

General Description: Furosemide is a diuretic (water pill) used in dogs and cats to remove excess body fluids, in conditions such as heart or lung disease. It may also be used to treat high blood...

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General Description: Furosemide is a diuretic (water pill) used in dogs and cats to remove excess body fluids, in conditions such as heart or lung disease. It may also be used to treat high blood pressure or help with regulation of electrolyte levels. While on this medication, ensure your pet has good access to drinking water as your pet will be thirsty and will need to urinate more frequently. Furosemide is available as tablets and as an oral liquid.

What is this drug?

Furosemide is a diuretic (helps the body lose water via increased urine production)
Furosemide is given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Because this drug helps remove excessive fluids from the body, it is useful in the treatment of congestive heart failure, pulmonary edema, kidney disease, liver disease, false pregnancy and edema
To treat high blood pressure
To reduce excessive calcium or potassium levels
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Dehydrated pets, pets having difficulty urinating or those with an electrolyte (ex. calcium or potassium) imbalance
Use with caution in pets with kidney or liver disease or diabetes
Pets with a history of calcium oxalate bladder stones
Pregnant and nursing pets
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to furosemide or other sulfa drugs
Directions:

Your pet will likely need to urinate within 30 minutes of taking furosemide. The drug peaks 1-2 hours after administration. Your pet will have to urinate more frequently than normal and ‘accidents’ are possible.

Give this medication with or without food.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is usually givenone to three times daily.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

Ensure your pet has plenty of food and fresh, clean drinking water while taking furosemide.

Furosemide may cause your pet’s skin to be more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may occur. Keep your pet out of the sun as much as possible.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Pet owners allergic to sulfonamides and/or other antibiotics should avoid handling this drug.

Potential side effects:

As with any diuretic, the main side effects are increased thirst and urination
Electrolyte (salts) imbalances may occur. Your veterinarian may wish periodic blood testing to assess furosemide’s effect on your pet.
High blood sugar levels (may not be a good choice for diabetic patients)
Weakness or lethargy could indicate potassium levels have dropped too low. Contact your veterinarian if your pet shows these effects.
Damage to nerves responsible for hearing (especially in cats). If you notice your pet exhibiting a loss of balance or a head tilt, notify your veterinarian immediately.
Humans with sulfonamide sensitivities have experienced allergic reactions to furosemide. This has not been reported in pets, but if your pet has a sulfonamide allergy, bring it to your veterinarian’s attention.
Restlessness, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, itching, rash
Rare cases of anemia
Excessive thirst, fatigue, lack of urination, racing heartbeat
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with vasodilating heart medications (especially enalapril, benazepril and lisinopril). Your pet may need both types of drugs. To avoid problems, blood tests may be necessary.
Care should be taken if your pet is also taking aminogylcoside antibiotics, amphotericin B, corticosteroids (prednisone), curare and its derivatives, digitalis derivatives, insulin, NSAIDS (ex. aspirin, carprofen), phenothiazines (ex. acepromazine), probenecid or sulfinpyrazone.
If your pet is also taking theophylline, the dose may be reduced.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet consumes more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, furosemide should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed. It is important to periodically discuss your pet’s response to furosemide at regular check ups. Your veterinarian will best determine if your pet is responding as expected and if your pet should continue receiving furosemide.

This is just a summary of information about furosemide. If you have any questions or concerns about furosemide or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Glipizide

General Description: Glipizide is a drug used to lower blood sugar to normal levels in diabetic cats. It may be used in conjunction with a low carbohydrate diet, exercise +/- insulin therapy....

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General Description: Glipizide is a drug used to lower blood sugar to normal levels in diabetic cats. It may be used in conjunction with a low carbohydrate diet, exercise +/- insulin therapy. Glipizide is available as 5 mg tablets.

What is this drug?

Glipizide is an antidiabetic agent; an oral hypoglycemic agent; a sulfonylurea
Glipizide is not a cure for diabetes, but a tool to control blood sugars and alleviate clinical signs
Works by causing the pancreas to release more insulin
Given orally to cats
Reasons for prescribing:

Used to lower blood sugar to normal levels in cats with diabetes mellitus (Type II)
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Use with caution in cats with untreated disease of the pituitary or adrenal glands.
Not for use during diabetic emergencies, including diabetic coma
Pets who have stopped eating, are anorexic, vomiting, showing signs of extreme drowsiness or fatigue and/or showing signs of severe ketoacidosis
Cats with liver, kidney or thyroid disease or a serious infection, illness or trauma
Pregnant and nursing cats
Known to be ineffective in cats resistant to insulin therapy
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to glipizide or other sulfa drugs
Directions:

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. If you have difficulty giving the medication, let your veterinarian know.

It is usually given twice daily with meals . Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily.

Do not skip doses or stop giving the medication without consulting your veterinarian. If you have difficulty giving glipizide, discuss this with your veterinarian.

It is usually given for the rest of the cat’s life.

If your cat’s blood sugar values do not improve after 1-2 months, it might be best to switch your cat to insulin.

Baseline blood work to assess your pet’s health before starting this drug will need to be performed. Periodic blood work to monitor its effect is necessary also. Dose adjustments will be made based upon the results and an assessment of how your dog is responding clinically.

Follow any diet or exercise plan developed for your pet by your veterinarian. Do not change the pet’s food, feeding schedule or exercise schedule once regulated.

Do not give a dose of glipizide if the pet is experiencing low blood glucose (hypoglycemia). Common causes for hypoglycemia include: failure to eat, accidental doubling of glipizide dose, strenuous exercise, drug effects.
Ensure you always have at least one extra bottle of glipizide on hand. Call ahead for refills.

Ensure your pet has fresh, clean drinking water at all times. Monitoring water consumption and urination amount is a good indication of glucose control.

Tell your veterinarian that your cat is taking glipizide before undergoing any surgery.

What if dose is missed?

If you miss a dose, give it as soon as you remember it, but if it is within a few hours of the regularly scheduled dose, wait and give it at the regular time. Occasional missed doses are easily tolerated; overdoses can be fatal.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

The signs of diabetes mellitus that you’ve noticed
When will your pet need to be rechecked. Frequent blood glucose tests will need to be done initially to ensure glipizide is doing its job and that the correct dose is being used.
The importance of consistent daily dosing, consistent weight, diet and exercise and home monitoring
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver, pancreas, thyroid, adrenal gland or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing. Spaying your intact pet will likely be necessary.
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Pet owners allergic to glipizide or sulfa drugs should wear gloves and exercise extreme caution while handling this drug.

Potential side effects:

It may lose its effect after several months. It is not effective in all diabetic cats. These cats will need treatment with insulin.
Your cat may vomit initially, but this should stop in 2-5 days. Contact your veterinarian if it doesn’t.
Some cats experience nausea and appetite loss. Give the medication in food to help with these symptoms. Not eating can be dangerous for the diabetic pet.
A sudden lowering of blood sugar (hypoglycemia) may occur when treatment is first started. If you notice your cat with any of the following signs, rub ¼ teaspoon of Karo® syrup carefully onto the gums and take your cat to the veterinarian: weakness, wobbling, head tilting, shivering, sleepiness, glassy eyes, seizures, hunger, confusion or uncharacteristically inactive.
Hypoglycemia may occur at other times as well. It can be caused by giving too much glipizide, missing or delaying food, changing the food or amount fed, increasing exercise, an infection or illness or a drug interaction.
Liver toxicity occurs in some cats. Signs would include vomiting, depression, decreased appetite, jaundice (yellowing of the skin, gums or eyes). Your veterinarian will want to test your cat’s liver enzymes every 1-2 weeks initially.
Possible bone marrow suppression leading to anemia (pale gums, weakness, lethargy, bruising or bleeding tendencies) and decreased white cell counts which puts your cat at greater risk of infection.
Contact your veterinarian if your cat drinks or urinates more or has any other signs that the diabetes is not well-controlled.
High blood sugar (hyperglycemia): notify your veterinarian immediately if the pet experiences unusual thirst, hunger and urination
If your pet had an allergic reaction, s/he would experience difficult breathing, hives, scratching, swollen lips, tongue or face, sudden onset of diarrhea, vomiting, shock, seizures, pale gums, cold limbs, or coma. If you observe any of these symptoms, contact your veterinarian immediately.
Females should be spayed as estrus will change insulin requirements
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with cimetidine, chloramphenicol, furazolidone, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as aspirin, meloxicam), phenothiazines (ex. acepromazine), steroids (ex. prednisone), sulfa drugs (ex. SMZ/TMP), thiazide diuretics and warfarin.
Do not give any other prescription or over-the-counter drugs, including vitamins, minerals, herbal products, cold, allergy, pain medications without first talking to your veterinarian.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if your pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Have your pet wear an identification tag that indicates it is a diabetic. Perhaps include your veterinarian’s name and phone number.

Never leave home without sugar or corn syrup. Liquid glucose packets can be bought at your pharmacy. Become very aware of your pet’s ‘normal’ behavior in order to determine when something is wrong.

There are urine dipstick tests that can help you measure urine glucose. If you detect ketones in the urine, this can be a very bad sign. Contact your veterinarian if urine ketones persist more than a couple of days.

Litter additives that detect glucose in urine are also available.

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, glipizide should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about glipizide. If you have any questions or concerns about glipizide or diabetes, contact your veterinarian.

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Felbamate

General Description: Felbamate is used as an anticonvulsant in seizuring dogs. Felbamate is usually used in combination with other drugs in those patients who respond inadequately to alternative...

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General Description: Felbamate is used as an anticonvulsant in seizuring dogs. Felbamate is usually used in combination with other drugs in those patients who respond inadequately to alternative treatments. Felbamate should not be used in patients at risk for anemias or liver disease. Felbamate is available in 400 mg and 600 mg tablets, as well as an oral suspension that is 600 mg/5 mL.

What is this drug?

A ‘third-line’ anticonvulsant
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Used to control seizures in dogs when other drugs alone have not succeeded
This drug’s use in veterinary medicine is limited at this time. Potential risks to your pet will be weighed against the potential benefits. Your veterinarian will work with you to monitor for any side effects.
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Safe use in pregnant animals has not been confirmed
Use with extreme caution in pets with liver disease or blood disorders
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to felbamate or carbamates
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. It is usually giventhree times a day . Seizures may reoccur if a dose is missed.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily.

Baseline blood work to assess your pet’s health before starting this drug is recommended. Periodic blood work to monitor the drug’s effect on the body will be necessary. Dose adjustments will be made based upon the results and an assessment of how your dog is responding clinically.

It may take several days before adequate blood levels will be reached to effectively control seizures. Monitor carefully during this time.

Record the date, time, severity, length and circumstances of any seizure your pet has. Provide this information to your veterinarian in order to help him/her to best treat your pet.

Call ahead for refills.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Shake suspension well before using. Store at controlled room temperature 20°-25°C (68°-77°F). Keep container tightly closed.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Your pet will likely be tired when first prescribed felbamate. Some pets become agitated and anxious too.
Your pet may stagger, seem depressed or sedated
Your pet may experience nausea, vomiting and salivation
May cause liver disease. Liver enzymes should be monitored before and during therapy. If you notice jaundice (yellow gums, skin or eyes), let your veterinarian know.
Anemias have been reported in people receiving this medication. Watch for weakness, pale gums or increased bleeding or bruising tendencies.
If your pet experiences these symptoms, has any additional seizures or you notice anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with phenobarbital, phenytoin and valproic acid.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, felbamate should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

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Fluconazole

General Description: Fluconazole is an oral antifungal agent used to treat fungal infections in dogs and cats (ex. urinary, ringworm, central nervous system infections). Fluconazole is expensive but...

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General Description: Fluconazole is an oral antifungal agent used to treat fungal infections in dogs and cats (ex. urinary, ringworm, central nervous system infections). Fluconazole is expensive but has fewer side effects than some other antifungal agents. Fluconazole may be given with or without food. This medication is available in different strengths as an oral suspension or as tablets.

What is this drug?

Antifungal
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Treatment of fungal infections, particularly of the central nervous system and urinary tract
Treatment of yeast infections of the skin and ringworm
Fewer side effects than other antifungal agents, although expensive
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to fluconazole or like products before
Use with caution in pets with poor kidney function
Pets with liver disease
Pregnant or nursing animals
Directions:

Fluconazole may be given with or without food.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. Depending upon the condition, this medication may be given once or twice daily.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy. Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

Call ahead for refills. Long-term therapy (a few weeks to months) is usually necessary for successful results.

It may take one or two weeks before effects of the medication are noted.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Decrease in appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, liver toxicity (jaundice – yellowing of gums, skin or eyes). If these symptoms are experienced, stop medication and have your veterinarian check the liver enzymes.
Kidney failure
Depression, fatigue, pale gums (possible anemia)
Skin rash
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with amphotericin B, cyclosporine, digoxin, oral antidiabetic agents (ex. chlorporpramide, glipizide, etc), phenytoin, rifampin and warfarin (or other blood thinners).
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, fluconazole should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

As therapy may be long-term, periodic blood tests may be necessary to monitor the drug’s effect on your pet’s body.

This is just a summary of information about fluconazole. If you have any questions or concerns about fluconazole or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Fluoxetine hydrochloride

General Description: Fluoxetine is an SSRI antidepressant useful in treating separation anxiety, inappropriate urination and many other behavioral issues in dogs and cats. Best results are achieved...

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General Description: Fluoxetine is an SSRI antidepressant useful in treating separation anxiety, inappropriate urination and many other behavioral issues in dogs and cats. Best results are achieved with most behavior drugs by simultaneous use of behavior modification training. Fluoxetine is available as tablets, chewable tablets, capsules and as an oral liquid.

What is this drug?

Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant
Fluoxetine is given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

To reduce separation anxiety and increase receptivity to training techniques that create positive behavior
To treat inappropriate urine marking in dogs and cats
To treat aggression, thunderstorm phobias plus various obsessive compulsive behaviors such as chewing, circling and self-mutilation
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Dogs less than 6 months or weighing less than 8.8 lbs
Pets also receiving drugs known as MAO inhibitors
Use with caution in diabetics and those with liver or kidney disease
Pets with a history of seizures
Breeding, pregnant or nursing animals
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to fluoxetine or other SSRIs
If your pet is presently taking like products (unless directed by your veterinarian)
Directions:

Fluoxetine will be administered in conjunction with a positive behavior modification program. It is essential to follow the training plan as well as administer the medication, to achieve therapy success.

Give this medication with or without food, although giving with food may lessen any stomach upset.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is usually givenonce a day for several weeks.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Occasionally, your veterinarian may change the dose to achieve the best results.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

Do not give your dog aged cheese while on fluoxetine.

It may take several weeks before effects of the medication are noted.

Do not abruptly discontinue this drug. It will be necessary to slowly taper the dose over time to reduce unpleasant side effects and ensure your pet’s behavior does not return.

Baseline and periodic blood testing may be necessary to assess the pet’s health and response to fluoxetine.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight. Do not remove the desiccant, if included.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Pet owners allergic to fluoxetine and/or other SSRIs should avoid handling this drug.

Potential side effects:

Commonly, dogs lose their appetite, and subsequently lose weight. Tempt your dog with better tasting foods or hand feed until this side effect wears off. Report continued lack of appetite to your veterinarian.
Lethargy, drowsiness
Vomiting, diarrhea, shaking, restlessness, panting, irritability, excessive vocalization
Some dogs lose their inhibitions while medicated and become aggressive
Low chance of seizures
Liver disease has been reported. Monitor your pet for fatigue, lack of appetite as well as yellowing of the gums, skin, or the whites of the eyes. Your veterinarian may want to perform liver function blood tests.
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with buspirone, cimetidine, diazepam, digoxin, encainide, flecainide, haloperidol, lithium, l-tryptophan, metoclopramide, perphenazine, phenylbutazone, phenytoin, propafenone, thioridazine, tricyclic antidepressants (ex. amitriptylline, clomipramine, imipramine) and warfarin.
Fluoxetine should not be used within 14 days of administering MAOIs (ex. amitraz, deprenyl, isoniazid, selegiline)
Fluoxetine should not be given with drugs that could increase the likelihood of seizures (ex. acepromazine, cloropromazine)
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet consumes more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, fluoxetine should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about fluoxetine. If you have any questions or concerns about fluoxetine or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Gabapentin

General Description: Gabapentin is used as an anticonvulsant and to relieve chronic pain. Gabapentin may be used alone or in combination with other drugs. Gabapentin is available in 100 mg, 300 mg,...

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General Description: Gabapentin is used as an anticonvulsant and to relieve chronic pain. Gabapentin may be used alone or in combination with other drugs. Gabapentin is available in 100 mg, 300 mg, and 400 mg capsules: 600 mg and 800 mg tablets; and oral solution.

What is this drug?

An anticonvulsant
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

To control seizures in dogs or cats
To control chronic pain, especially arthritis pain
To control pain associated with surgery
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Pregnant or nursing pets
Use with caution in pets with kidney or liver disease or a blood disorder
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to gabapentin
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

If using the oral solution, shake well before measuring.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. For seizure control, it is usually given three times a day , but for pain control it is usually givenonce a day . Anti-seizure doses are much higher than the doses given for analgesia.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily.

Gabapentin may be given with or without food.

It may take several days before adequate blood levels will be reached to effectively control seizures. Monitor carefully during this time.

Do not suddenly discontinue giving gabapentin. Check with your veterinarian before stopping this drug.

Record the date, time, severity, length and circumstances of any seizure your pet has. Provide this information to your veterinarian in order to help him/her to best treat your pet.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store capsules and tablets in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight. Refrigerate the oral suspension.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Drowsiness, loss of balance, limb swelling
Nausea, vomiting and diarrhea
Some laboratory tests are affected by gabapentin
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with narcotics (hydrocodone or morphine)
When treating for chronic pain, gabapentin is often started with other pain relievers. It is often possible to at some point eliminate the other drugs and have the pet remain on just gabapentin.
Do not give oral antacids within 2 hours of giving gabapentin
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, gabapentin should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about gabapentin. If you have any questions or concerns about gabapentin or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Glucosamine + Chondroitin sulfate

General Description: Glucosamine and chondroitin has been prescribed to give your pet the building blocks necessary to repair damaged joint cartilage. As well, the anti-inflammatory properties of the ...

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General Description: Glucosamine and chondroitin has been prescribed to give your pet the building blocks necessary to repair damaged joint cartilage. As well, the anti-inflammatory properties of the ingredients will gradually build up to help support joint health in your pet. This product may be used in combination with others to achieve good results for arthritic pets. This product has also been used to treat cancer pain and may be of benefit in the treatment of lower urinary tract disease in cats. Glucosamine and Chondroitin sulfate is available in tablets, capsules, powders and oral liquids.

What is this drug?

Cartilage components harvested mainly from shellfish, but also from shark skeleton and cattle
A nutraceutical (a nutrient with medicinal properties) with slow acting effects (weeks to months)
Basic starting level for joint care
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

To improve joint function and help with pain relief in arthritic dogs and cats
May be used in the treatment of lower urinary tract disease in cats
May be used to treat cancer pain
May be used in combination with NSAIDs or other drugs
Not helpful in joint disease involving the vertebrae and intervertebral discs
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Safety in pregnant and nursing animals is unknown
Use with caution in pets with asthma (human patients report increased asthma symptoms)
If your pet has had an earlier allergic reaction to Glucosamine and/or Chondroitin sulfate
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

These products do not produce rapid results, but need one to two months to build up within the body.

Products vary greatly. Dosage experimentation may be necessary with the help of your veterinarian. Typically the pet starts therapy at a high dose and once effects have been noticed, the dose is reduced to a maintenance level.

It is usually given once a day and is usually used for the life of the pet.

Glucosamine and Chondroitin sulfate may be given with or without food.

Arthritic pets also benefit from weight control, proper exercise and physical therapy.

Nutraceuticals are not regulated by the FDA. As such, they have not been required to go through the same rigorous testing for efficacy that drugs undergo. Many products on the market are high quality and are made by reputable companies. Consult with your veterinarian to choose a sound product for your pet.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Potential side effects:

These products are usually well tolerated
Clinically insignificant decrease in platelet function (blood clotting)
Stomach upset is possible, but are usually mild and include flatulence and soft bowel movements
High doses could enhance effects of anticoagulants
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but interactions may occur with anticoagulants, aspirin, doxorubicin, etoposide, phenylbutazone or other drugs that influence platelet function.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

If your pet receives more than the prescribed amount, contact your veterinarian immediately.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, Glucosamine and Chondroitin sulfate should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about Glucosamine and Chondroitin sulfate. If you have any questions or concerns about Glucosamine and Chondroitin sulfate or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Griseofulvin

General Description: Griseofulvin is an oral antifungal agent used to treat fungal infections in dogs and cats, especially ringworm. Give griseofulvin with a fatty meal to reduce stomach upset and...

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General Description: Griseofulvin is an oral antifungal agent used to treat fungal infections in dogs and cats, especially ringworm. Give griseofulvin with a fatty meal to reduce stomach upset and increase absorption. This medication is available in different tablet strengths.

What is this drug?

Antifungal
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

To treat fungal conditions of the skin, hair and nails, most notably ringworm
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Cats with Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) or Feline Leukemia (FeLV) as griseofulvin might compromise their immune system
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to griseofulvin
Pets with liver disease
Breeding or pregnant animals
Directions:

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is usually givenonce or twice daily. Your veterinarian may suggest tablets be given with a fatty food (ex. butter or cheese).

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy. Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

Call ahead for refills. Treatment is usually for several weeks and should be continued until the patient has been cultured negative. Discontinuing medication too early may cause the disease to recur.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Nausea
If the pet experiences vomiting or diarrhea another medication can be prescribed. If this isn’t possible, then an anti-nausea medication may be helpful.
Kittens can be especially sensitive. Monitor your kitten for signs of weakness, decreased appetite or fever (>103°F). Contact veterinarian immediately.
Rare possibility of immune system being compromised in cats
Can be toxic to the liver (periodic blood tests may be advised)
Loss of appetite, anemia, depression, weakness
Skin inflammation and/or sensitivity to sunlight (keep pet out of direct sunlight as much as possible)
Most of the above effects (except gastrointestinal issues) are unusual with usual dosages
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with alcohol, phenobarbital and coumarin anticoagulants.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, griseofulvin should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

Ringworm will likely recur if a complete course of medication was not performed. Griseofulvin should be given until a fungal culture proves to be negative.

This is just a summary of information about griseofulvin. If you have any questions or concerns about griseofulvin or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Imidacloprid + Moxidectin

General Description: Imidacloprid + moxidectin is a topical insecticide and endectocide agent used in dogs and cats once a month to treat and control fleas, heartworms, hookworms and roundworms. It...

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General Description: Imidacloprid + moxidectin is a topical insecticide and endectocide agent used in dogs and cats once a month to treat and control fleas, heartworms, hookworms and roundworms. It will also treat and control whipworms in dogs and ear mites in cats. Imidacloprid + moxidectin is applied between the shoulder blades every thirty days. Dogs should be older than 7 weeks of age and cats older than 8 weeks of age. It is important to note that the dog product should only be used on dogs while the cat product should only be used on cats. Imidacloprid + moxidectin is available in 4 sizes for dogs and 2 sizes for cats (based upon body weight).

What is this drug?

Imidacloprid + moxidectin contains a combination of insecticide and endectocide agents
Imidacloprid + moxidectin is applied topically once a month
Reasons for prescribing:

For the prevention of heartworm disease and the treatment and control of fleas infestations, hookworms and roundworms in dogs and cats
Used for the treatment and control of ear mites in cats
Used for the treatment and control of whipworms in dogs
Effective as a treatment for FAD (flea allergy dermatitis)
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

NB. Dog product should only be used on dogs; Cat product should only be used on cats
Do not apply to irritated skin
Puppies less than 7 weeks of age or less than 3 pounds and cats less than 9 weeks of age or less than 2 pounds
Use with caution in Collies, Collie mixes, Australian shepherds and Australian shepherd mixes
Safety is unknown in breeding, pregnant or nursing animals
Use with caution in sick, debilitated or underweight pets
Heartworm positive patients
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to imidacloprid and/or moxidectin or like products
Directions:

Be sure to follow the dosage instructions provided by your veterinarian. If you have difficulty applying the medication, contact your veterinarian.

Apply imidacloprid + moxidectin carefully to the skin between your pet’s shoulder blades. For medium and larger dogs, squeeze contents evenly to three or four spots along the top of the back from the shoulder to the base of the tail. Use the entire contents of the tube that correctly corresponds with the body weight of your animal.

Do not allow pets to lick the product or ingest it in any way. If you have multiple pets, keep them separated for at least 30 minutes to prevent licking.

For heartworm prevention , repeat the application monthly all year long, or at a minimum, start one month before the first expected exposure to mosquitoes, continuing until one month after the last exposure to mosquitoes. Mark your calendar with the dates of subsequent treatments.

For flea treatment , administer monthly. Fleas already on the dog will be killed, but subsequent monthly treatments will prevent re-infestation of fleas hatching from the pet’s environment.

For treatment and control of internal worms , a single dose will be adequate.

For ear mite treatment in cats , a single dose will be adequate. Monthly use will control any future infestations.

After applying this product to your pet, wash your hands with soap and water. Small children should avoid handling the treated pet for at least 2 hours after application.

For external use only. Do NOT give by mouth. Keep the product away from your pet’s eyes and mouth.

Shampooing 90 minutes after treatment does not change its efficacy against heartworm disease. Shampooing or water immersion up to 4 days after treatment will not change the efficacy against flea infestations. However, shampooing as often as weekly may reduce the overall effectiveness against fleas. Additional applications of this product may be necessary. Discuss this with your veterinarian.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, apply it as soon as you can and resume the monthly dosing schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements including flea and tick products that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Causes eye irritation. Harmful if swallowed. Do not get in eyes or on clothing. Avoid contact with skin. Wash hands thoroughly with soap and water after handling.

People should not take this product. Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Do not contaminate water or food by storage or disposal. Do not reuse empty container. Securely wrap original container in several layers of newspaper and discard in trash.

Potential side effects:

Hair may become damp, matted, oily, or stiff after application; skin may appear pink or have a slight powdery residue; medicinal odor. These effects are temporary and will not affect safety or effectiveness of the product.
Dogs: scratching, rubbing or licking at the application site; lethargy, decreased appetite, vomiting, excitement, facial swelling. Contact your veterinarian if you see any of these signs. If your dog ingests the product or licks the application site, serious adverse effects including depression, salivation, dilated pupils, incoordination, panting and tremors may occur.
Cats: lethargy and prolonged periods of sleep; agitation, excessive grooming, hiding, pacing; rubbing or scratching at the application site; increased salivation within an hour of treatment, increased drinking; coughing. If your cat licks the application site, you may see increased salivation, tremors, vomiting and loss of appetite.
Individual sensitivities may occur with any pesticide product. If they occur, consult your veterinarian immediately
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

There have been no drug interactions noted with this medication, but if your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet is exposed to more than the prescribed amount.
To report a suspected Adverse Reaction, call 1-800-422-9874.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, imidacloprid + moxidectin should only be applied to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only to treat fleas.

This is just a summary of information about imidacloprid + moxidectin. If you have any questions or concerns about imidacloprid + moxidectin or for the condition(s) it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Itraconazole

General Description: Itraconazole is an antifungal agent used in dogs and cats to treat fungal infections (ex. blastomycosis). Itraconazole is expensive but has fewer side effects than some other...

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General Description: Itraconazole is an antifungal agent used in dogs and cats to treat fungal infections (ex. blastomycosis). Itraconazole is expensive but has fewer side effects than some other antifungal agents. Give itraconazole with a fatty meal to reduce stomach upset and increase absorption. This medication is available in capsules or as an oral solution.

What is this drug?

Antifungal
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Treatment of serious fungal infections, particularly blastomycosis
Fewer side effects than other antifungal agents, although expensive
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to itraconazole or like products before
Pets with liver disease
Pregnant or nursing animals
Directions:

Give medication with food.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. Depending upon the condition, this medication may be given once or twice daily. Your veterinarian may suggest tablets be given with a fatty food (ex. butter or cheese).

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy. Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

Call ahead for refills. Long-term therapy (a few weeks to months) is usually necessary for successful results.

If for some reason your pet needs antacids while on itraconazole, give them two hours after itraconazole is administered.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Decrease in appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue, weight loss, liver toxicity (jaundice – yellowing of gums, skin or eyes). If these symptoms are experienced, stop medication and have your veterinarian check the liver enzymes. After recovery, itraconazole therapy can usually be resumed at a lower dose.
Skin rash and/or leg swelling.
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with acyclovir, amlodipine, antacids, cimetidine, cyclosporine, digoxin, isoniazid, omeprazole, ranitidine, quinidine, phenytoin, rifampin and warfarin.
These drugs should not be given with itraconazole: astemizole, cisapride, didanosine, and terfenadine.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, itraconazole should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

As therapy may be long-term, periodic bloodwork may be necessary to monitor the drug’s effect on your pet’s body.

This is just a summary of information about itraconazole. If you have any questions or concerns about itraconazole or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Ivermectin + Pyrantel pamoate

General Description: Ivermectin + pyrantel pamoate is a combination of 2 anti-parasitic drugs used monthly in dogs and cats to prevent heartworm infection and for the treatment and control of...

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General Description: Ivermectin + pyrantel pamoate is a combination of 2 anti-parasitic drugs used monthly in dogs and cats to prevent heartworm infection and for the treatment and control of roundworms and hookworms. This product may be given with or without food. Chewable tablets are available in different strengths.

What is this drug?

Ivermectin and pyrantel pamoate is a combination of two anti-parasite drugs
Ivermectin and pyrantel pamoate is given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

For heartworm prevention in dogs
For treatment and control of roundworms and hookworms
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

For use in dogs only
Puppies less than 6 weeks of age
Safe for use in Collies, Australian shepherds, Old English sheepdogs, Shelties and any of these crossbreed dogs if given the regular monthly heartworm preventative dosing level
Safe for use in breeding, pregnant and nursing animals
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to ivermectin or pyrantel pamoate or like products
Directions:

Give this medication with or without food. The medication is meant to be chewed before swallowing. It may be necessary to break the chewable into smaller pieces and hand feed as treats. Ensure that your pet consumes the entire dose.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is often given seasonally.

As a heartworm preventative, this medication is given once a month, beginning within a month after the pet’s first exposure to mosquitoes. The medication kills the parasites acquired during the previous month. The final dose should be given within a month of the last exposure to mosquitoes.

Monthly treatment also provides effective treatment and control of roundworms and hookworms.

Ideally, give the medication on or about the same day each month.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time. If you miss more than 8 weeks in a row, give the drug as soon as you remember, but you should have your pet’s blood tested for heartworms within 6 months (as infection may have occurred).

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
Whether a blood test will need to be performed prior to treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

People should not take this product. Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

When the parasites begin to die off, the animal may experience a mild hypersensitivity reaction including diarrhea
Self-limiting reactions may include lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, decreased appetite, staggering, hypersalivation, convulsions within 24 hours of treatment
It is important to stop therapy and contact your veterinarian immediately if you think your pet has a medical problem or side effect from this product’s therapy
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, when ivermectin and pyrantel are used at the recommended dose, there are no contraindicated drugs. When higher doses are used, interactions may occur with amitraz dips and collars (Mitaban®, Preventic®), spinosad (Comfortis™) or valiumor-related tranquilizers.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet consumes more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, this product should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about ivermectin and pyrantel pamoate. If you have any questions or concerns about this product or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Ketoconazole

General Description: Ketoconazole is an antifungal agent used to treat fungal infections (ex. ringworm, bone, lung, central nervous system infections). It may also be prescribed for Cushing’s disease ...

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General Description: Ketoconazole is an antifungal agent used to treat fungal infections (ex. ringworm, bone, lung, central nervous system infections). It may also be prescribed for Cushing’s disease or for other reasons. Give ketoconazole with a fatty meal to reduce stomach upset and increase absorption. This medication is available as a tablet or in various topical preparations.

What is this drug?

Antifungal
Given by mouth; some forms are used topically
Reasons for prescribing:

Treatment of fungal infections, whether limited to the skin (ex. ringworm, Malassezia dermatitis), or more serious infections affecting organ systems (bone, lungs, nervous system)
Treatment of Cushing’s disease
Sometimes used at the same time as the expensive drug Cyclosporine. Ketoconazole reduces the amount of cyclosporine needed.
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Some believe ketoconazole should not be used in cats
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to ketoconazole or like products before
Pets with liver disease or clotting disorders
Breeding, pregnant or nursing animals
Directions:

To reduce the incidence of stomach upset, divide the dose and give with meals.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. Depending upon the condition, this medication may be given once, twice or three times daily. Your veterinarian may suggest tablets be given with a fatty food (ex. butter or cheese).

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy. Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

Call ahead for refills. Long term-therapy (from a few weeks up until a year) is usually necessary for successful results.

If for some reason your pet needs antacids while on ketoconazole, give them two hours after ketoconazole is administered.

It may take one or two weeks before effects of the medication are noted.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

When administering the topical cream, the owner should wear gloves and wash hands after use.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Nausea, decrease in appetite, vomiting, diarrhea (especially cats)
High doses may cause liver disease (jaundice – yellowing of gums, skin or eyes), but are resolved when medication is discontinued. This has been found more often in cats and some dogs. Monitoring liver enzymes and blood counts during long-term therapy is advised.
Some individuals will have a lightened hair coat while undergoing therapy. Reverses when medication is discontinued.
May cause bleeding problems
Some individuals may need prednisone administered along with ketoconazole
Testicular secretion of testosterone is reduced; may produce a feminizing effect or infertility in males.
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with acyclovir, antacids, anticholinergics (ex. propantheline), cyclosporine, digoxin, ethanol, H 2blockers (cimetidine, ranitidine), isoniazid, mitotane, methylprednisolone, phenytoin, rifampin, theophylline and warfarin.
These drugs should not be given with ketoconazole: astemizole, cisapride and terfenadine.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, ketoconazole should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about ketoconazole. If you have any questions or concerns about ketoconazole or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Imidacloprid

General Description: Imidacloprid is a topical insecticidal agent used in dogs and cats once a month to treat fleas. Imidacloprid is applied to the skin between the shoulder blades every thirty days. ...

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General Description: Imidacloprid is a topical insecticidal agent used in dogs and cats once a month to treat fleas. Imidacloprid is applied to the skin between the shoulder blades every thirty days. Dogs should be greater than 7 weeks of age and cats more than 8 weeks of age. It is important to note that the dog product should only be used on dogs while the cat product should only be used on cats. Imidacloprid is available in 4 sizes for dogs and 2 sizes for cats (based upon body weight).

What is this drug?

Imidacloprid is an insecticidal agent
Imidacloprid is applied topically once a month
Reasons for prescribing:

To treat fleas in dogs and cats
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

NB. Dog product should only be used on dogs; Cat product should only be used on cats
Puppies less than 7 weeks of age and kittens less than 8 weeks of age
Use with caution in older, debilitated, pregnant or nursing animals
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to imidacloprid or like products
Directions:

Be sure to follow the dosage instructions provided by your veterinarian. If you have difficulty applying the medication, contact your veterinarian.

Apply imidacloprid carefully to the skin between your pet’s shoulder blades. For medium and larger dogs, squeeze contents evenly to three or four spots along the top of the back from the shoulder to the base of the tail. Use the entire contents of the tube that correctly corresponds with the body weight of your animal.

Do not allow pets to lick the product or ingest in any way. If you have multiple pets, keep them separated for a short time to prevent licking. Repeat application monthly. Mark your calendar with the dates of subsequent treatments.

After applying this product to your pet, wash your hands with soap and water. Small children should avoid handling the treated pet for a day or two.

For external use only. Do NOT give by mouth. Keep the product away from your pet’s eyes and mouth (salivation is likely if any is consumed as the product tastes bitter).

This product stops fleas biting within 3-5 minutes, and starts killing fleas within 1 hour. Within 12 hours, 98-100% of the adult fleas will be dead. This product will continue to be effective for up to 4 weeks.

Regular bathing will not interfere with the efficacy of the product, but if the pet needs frequent bathing, reapplication more often than once a month may be necessary (but no more than once a week). Swimming, getting caught in the rain or exposure to sun will not be a problem.

Read and follow the label carefully.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, apply it as soon as you can and resume the monthly dosing schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements including flea and tick products that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Causes eye irritation. Harmful if swallowed. Do not get in eyes or on clothing. Avoid contact with skin. Wash hands thoroughly with soap and water after handling.

People should not take this product. Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Do not contaminate water or food by storage or disposal. Do not reuse empty container. Securely wrap original container in several layers of newspaper and discard in trash.

Potential side effects:

This medication is usually well tolerated by dogs and cats
Individual sensitivities may occur with any pesticide product. If they occur, consult your veterinarian immediately
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

There have been no drug interactions noted with this medication, but if your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet is exposed to more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, imidacloprid should only be applied to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only to treat fleas.

This is just a summary of information about imidacloprid. If you have any questions or concerns about imidacloprid or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Insulin

General Description: Insulin is an injectable medication used to control diabetic patients’ blood sugar levels. Your veterinarian has chosen this product to most closely match your pet’s natural...

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General Description: Insulin is an injectable medication used to control diabetic patients’ blood sugar levels. Your veterinarian has chosen this product to most closely match your pet’s natural insulin. Special insulin syringes (U-40) will be necessary to administer this product. Review the material below now and each time you refill this prescription.

What is this drug?

Insulin is a hormone that is naturally produced by the pancreas. It helps regulate blood sugar. When the body doesn’t produce enough insulin or when it is produced but not effective, the result is diabetes. Administration of commercial insulin will slowly release insulin into your pet’s body tissue.
Insulin is a simple molecule, but they do vary slightly between species. Your veterinarian will choose the best insulin for your pet.
Insulin is not a cure for diabetes, but a tool to control blood sugars and alleviate clinical signs
Insulin is given by injection under the skin
Reasons for prescribing:

Used to control hyperglycemia in dogs and cats with diabetes mellitus
This medication will cause the blood sugar to go down
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

The safety and effectiveness in puppies and kittens, as well as breeding, pregnant and nursing dogs and cats has not been evaluated
Pets who have stopped eating, are anorexic, vomiting, showing signs of extreme drowsiness or fatigue and/or showing signs of severe ketoacidosis
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to insulin
Pets allergic to pork or beef should not use insulin from either of these sources
Directions:

Veterinary insulin products should be given subcutaneously (under the skin) using a U-40 insulin syringe only. Most human products are 100 units per milliliter, therefore would use a U-100 syringe. Some syringes are marked in units and milliliters. Be sure to use the unit scale.

Consult with your veterinarian to ensure you are using the correct syringe for the product prescribed. Ensure you use the correct syringe or you will likely cause incorrect dosing. Accurate dosing/measuring is critical.

Insulin syringes bought at the drugstore may require a prescription.

Feed your pet, make sure that a reasonable amount has been eaten and then give the insulin. If you think your pet is off food or not eating well, do not give the insulin and notify your vet.

Meals should be approximately equal and fed ~12 hours apart.

Giving the injection:

Just prior to use, gently roll the vial between the palms of your hands ~10 times. Do not shake.

When drawing up the insulin, always hold the bottle vertically to avoid unnecessary bubbles in the syringe. If you get bubbles in the syringe, flick the syringe with fingers until the bubble rises to the top and simple plush the air out of the syringe with the plunger.

Before injecting insulin, allow it to come to room temperature in the syringe. Pull up a handful of your pet’s scruff. A triangle of skin is formed. Aim your needle for the center of this triangle and stick in the needle. Do not be shy or the needle will not penetrate the thick skin. Pull back slightly on the syringe plunger to ensure you do not get blood back in the syringe. If you see blood, pull the syringe and start over in a slightly different location. If you do not see blood, press the plunger forward and deliver the insulin dose. Reward your pet!

Remember to rotate the injection sites with each injection.

If there is struggling or your pet escapes and you are not sure if your pet got the entire dose of insulin, do not give more, but wait until the next scheduled dose.

Dosage regimens vary greatly among patients. The goal is to maintain blood sugar levels in an acceptable range over the course of the day, by giving injections once or twice a day (usually twice).

Peak effect is ~4-10 hours after dose is given.

Keeping the sugars in proper range will control your pet’s excessive urination and appetite. Trial and error with dosing will be necessary and will be adjusted based upon your pet’s blood glucose levels and improvement of other clinical signs.

Further adjustments may be necessary to the pet’s diet (high protein/low carbohydrate – cats; high fiber – dogs), body weight or other medications.

Follow any diet or exercise plan developed for your pet by your veterinarian.

Do not give a dose of insulin if the pet is experiencing low blood glucose (hypoglycemia). Common causes for hypoglycemia include: excessive doses of insulin, failure to eat, accidental doubling of insulin dose, strenuous exercise, drug effects.
Do not give insulin if the pet has not eaten for 12-24 hours.

Do not change the pet’s food, feeding schedule or exercise schedule once regulated. Unscheduled treats should be avoided.

Lantus is a clear liquid; the other insulins are cloudy when gently mixed. Discard opened bottles after 4 weeks.

Ensure you always have at least two bottles of insulin on hand.

Ensure your pet has fresh, clean drinking water at all times. Monitoring water consumption and urination amount is a good indication of glucose control.

What if dose is missed?

If you miss a dose, give it as soon as you remember it, but if it is within a few hours of the regularly scheduled dose, wait and give it at the regular time. Occasional missed doses are easily tolerated; overdoses can be fatal.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

The signs of diabetes mellitus that you’ve noticed
When will your pet need to be rechecked. Frequent blood glucose tests will need to be done initially to determine the type of insulin to use and the correct dose required. After this has been determined, follow up blood checks will need to be done according to your veterinarian’s advice.
It is not uncommon for a pet’s insulin requirement to change over time. Watch for weight loss, excessive appetite, thirst and urination. An adjustment to the insulin dose may be necessary.
The importance of consistent daily injections, consistent weight, diet and exercise and home monitoring
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver, pancreas, thyroid, adrenal gland or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing. Spaying your intact pet will likely be necessary.
Storage and Warnings:

Some insulins need to be refrigerated and others do not. Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations. Do not freeze. Protect from light.

Just prior to use, gently roll the vial between the palms of your hands ~10 times. Do not shake.

Do not re-use a syringe. Dispose of all syringes in a ‘Sharps’ container or another appropriate puncture-resistant disposal container. Discuss disposal options for this container with your veterinarian.

Do not use any insulin product after the labeled expiration date.

Do not use any insulin that has been frozen or exposed to direct heat or light.

Do not use the insulin if the product has become discolored, has particles in it, or looks different than previous vials.

Discard opened bottles after 4 weeks.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Pet owners allergic to insulin and/or other antibiotics should avoid handling this drug.

Potential side effects:

Pets allergic to pork or beef should not use insulin from either of these sources
Allergies are rare, but an allergic reaction would show as difficult breathing, hives, scratching, swollen lips, tongue or face, sudden onset of diarrhea, vomiting, shock, seizures, pale gums, cold limbs, or coma. If you observe any of these symptoms, contact your veterinarian immediately.
Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is the most common side effect. It is caused by giving too much insulin, missing or delaying food, changing the food or amount fed, increasing exercise, an infection or illness or a drug interaction.
Symptoms include disorientation, weakness, hunger, nausea, rapid heartbeat, lethargy, staggering, cold, possibly seizures and coma. Hypoglycemic cats may simply be inactive. Offer the pet food. If s/he won’t eat, give the pet sugar (ex. light Karo syrup) rubbed carefully onto the pet’s gums. Swallowing is not necessary as the sugars are absorbed directly through the mucous membranes of the mouth. This should revive the pet within 1-2 minutes. Once your pet has responded and is sitting up, feed s/he a high-protein meal. Contact your veterinarian for the next step(s).
High blood sugar (hyperglycemia): notify your veterinarian immediately if the pet experiences drowsiness, dry mouth, flushed dry skin, increased urination, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, trouble breathing or unusual thirst.
Contact your veterinarian if you notice excessive water consumption for more than 3 days, excessive urination, loss of appetite, weakness, seizures, behavior change, muscle twitching, anxiety, constipation, vomiting, diarrhea, signs of a bladder infection (small, frequent urinations, straining, blood in the urine) or swelling of the head or neck
Dogs who are poorly regulated have a greater risk of developing cataracts
Females should be spayed as estrus will change insulin requirements
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but the dose may need to be adjusted. These drugs may interact with insulin: anabolic steroids, alcohol, aspirin and other salicylates, beta-adrenergic blockers, cardiac glycosides, dextrothyroxine, dobutamine, epinephrine, estrogen/progesterone combinations, furosoemide, glucocorticoids, guanethidine, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, phenylbutazone, sulfinpyrazone, tetracycline, thyiazide diuretics and thyroid medications.
Do not give any other prescription or over-the-counter drugs, including vitamins, minerals and herbal products, without first talking to your veterinarian.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if you inject more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Have your pet wear an identification tag that indicates it is a diabetic. Perhaps include your veterinarian’s name and phone number.

Never leave home without sugar or corn syrup. Liquid glucose packets can be bought at your pharmacy. Become very aware of your pet’s ‘normal’ behavior in order to determine when something is wrong.

There are urine dipstick tests that can help you measure urine glucose. If you detect ketones in the urine, this can be a very bad sign. Contact your veterinarian if urine ketones persist more than a couple of days.

Litter additives that detect glucose in urine are also available.

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, insulin should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about insulin. If you have any questions or concerns about insulin or diabetes, contact your veterinarian.

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Ivermectin

General Description: Ivermectin is an anti-parasitic drug used monthly in dogs and cats to prevent heartworm infection and for the treatment and control of hookworms and some forms of mange. Topical...

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General Description: Ivermectin is an anti-parasitic drug used monthly in dogs and cats to prevent heartworm infection and for the treatment and control of hookworms and some forms of mange. Topical solutions are used also to kill ear mites. This medication is available as regular tablets, chewable tablets and also as a topical solution.

What is this drug?

Ivermectin is an anti-parasite drug
Ivermectin is given by mouth, or topically (ear mites)
Reasons for prescribing:

For heartworm prevention in dogs and cats
For treatment and control of adult and immature hookworm infections in cats
For treatment of some types of mange
Topical solution is used to treat ear mites
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Puppies and kittens less than 6 weeks of age
Use with caution in Collies, Australian shepherds, Old English sheepdogs, Shelties and any of these crossbreed dogs
Should not be used in turtles and with great caution in some bird species
Considered safe for use in young cats at the regular heartworm preventive doses
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to ivermectin or like products
Directions:

Give this medication with or without food. Ivermectin is bitter, so some pets may need the taste masked with food.

Ensure that your pet consumes the entire dose.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is often given seasonally.

As a heartworm preventative, this medication is given once a month, beginning within a month after the pet’s first exposure to mosquitoes. The medication kills the parasites acquired during the previous month. The final dose should be given within a month of the last exposure to mosquitoes. Ideally, give the medication on or about the same day each month.

If this product replaces another type of heartworm preventive, the first dose must be given within 30 days after the last dose of the previous product.

As a topical ear mite killer, this product is usually given as a single treatment that is repeated several weeks later. Read and follow the label carefully.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time. If you miss more than 8 weeks in a row, give the drug as soon as you remember, but you should have your pet’s blood tested for heartworms within 6 months (as infection may have occurred).

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
Whether a blood test will need to be performed prior to treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Dispose of this product properly as it is very toxic to fish, turtles and other wildlife.

People should not take this product. Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Side effects are rare for ivermectin given at heartworm preventive doses
Considered to be safe in pregnant and nursing animals
Problems may arise at high doses in some dogs, especially Collies, Australian Shepherds, Old English Sheepdogs, Shelties and any of these crossbreed dogs. If your dog is one of these breeds, observe your pet for at least 8 hours after treatment for any signs of weakness, staggering, dilated pupils, trembling, etc. Take your pet to your veterinary clinic if s/he exhibits these symptoms.
When the parasite begin to die off, the animal may experience swelling, irritation and pain at the sites where the parasites are located. Dogs with a large number of heartworm larvae (immature heartworm) may experience a shock-like reaction as the parasites die all at once.
Reports of pain and vomiting in a small number of cats after the topical use of ivermectin for ear mites
It is important to stop therapy and contact your veterinarian immediately if you think your pet has a medical problem or side effect from this product’s therapy
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, when ivermectin is used at heartworm preventive doses, there are no contraindicated drugs. When higher doses are used (ie. for skin mites), interactions may occur with amitraz dips and collars (Mitaban®, Preventic®), spinosad (Comfortis™) or valiumor-related tranquilizers.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet consumes more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, ivermectin should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about ivermectin. If you have any questions or concerns about ivermectin or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Ivermectin + Pyrantel pamoate + Praziquantel

General Description: Ivermectin + pyrantel pamoate + praziquantel is a combination of 3 anti-parasitic drugs used monthly in dogs to prevent heartworm infection and for the treatment and control of...

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General Description: Ivermectin + pyrantel pamoate + praziquantel is a combination of 3 anti-parasitic drugs used monthly in dogs to prevent heartworm infection and for the treatment and control of tapeworms, roundworms and hookworms. This product may be given with or without food. Chewable tablets are available in different strengths.

What is this drug?

Ivermectin, pyrantel pamoate and praziquantel is a combination of three anti-parasite drugs
Ivermectin, pyrantel pamoate and praziquantel is given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

For heartworm prevention in dogs
For treatment and control of roundworms, hookworms and tapeworms
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

For use in dogs only
Puppies less than 8 weeks of age
Use with caution in sick, debilitated or underweight animals and dogs weighing less than 10 pounds
This product has not been evaluated in pregnant or nursing bitches
Safe for use in Collies, Australian shepherds, Old English sheepdogs, Shelties and any of these crossbreed dogs if given the regular monthly heartworm preventative dosing level
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to ivermectin, pyrantel pamoate or praziquantel or like products
Directions:

Give this medication with or without food. Ensure that your pet consumes the entire dose.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is often given seasonally.

As a heartworm preventative, this medication is given once a month, beginning within a month after the pet’s first exposure to mosquitoes. The medication kills the parasites acquired during the previous month. The final dose should be given within a month of the last exposure to mosquitoes.

Monthly treatment also provides effective treatment and control of roundworms, hookworms and whipworms.

Ideally, give the medication on or about the same day each month.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time. If you miss more than 8 weeks in a row, give the drug as soon as you remember, but you should have your pet’s blood tested for heartworms within 6 months (as infection may have occurred).

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
Whether a blood test will need to be performed prior to treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

People should not take this product. Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

When the parasites begin to die off, the animal may experience a mild hypersensitivity reaction including diarrhea
Self-limiting reactions may include lethargy, limpness, salivation, shaking, vomiting, diarrhea, decreased appetite, staggering, licking lips and belching 20 minutes to 72 hours following treatment
It is important to stop therapy and contact your veterinarian immediately if you think your pet has a medical problem or side effect from this product’s therapy
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, when this product is used at the recommended dose, there are no contraindicated drugs. When higher doses are used, interactions may occur with amitraz dips and collars (Mitaban®, Preventic®), spinosad (Comfortis™) or valiumor-related tranquilizers.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet consumes more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, this product should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about ivermectin, pyrantel pamoate and praziquantel. If you have any questions or concerns about this product or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Ketoprofen

General Description: Ketoprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used in dogs and cats to control fever, pain and inflammation. This medication should be given with food. Injectable...

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General Description: Ketoprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used in dogs and cats to control fever, pain and inflammation. This medication should be given with food. Injectable ketoprofen may be used while your pet is hospitalized, but an oral capsule is available for your use at home.

What is this drug?

Ketoprofen is an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory); non-narcotic
Ketoprofen is given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

To treat fever, pain and inflammation. Considered safer to use in pets than acetaminophen, aspirin and ibuprofen.
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Pets with bleeding problems or kidney disease
Pets with stomach ulcers or bowel disorders
Use with caution in pets with liver disease
Cats should not receive this drug longer than 5 days
Breeding and pregnant animals
Directions:

Give this medication with food.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is usually givenonce or twice daily.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Ketoprofen should be stored in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Vomiting or diarrhea
Increased thirst, weight loss
Bleeding in the intestinal tract. Contact your veterinarian if your pet vomits blood or has black, tarry or bloody stools)
Liver and kidney toxicity. Notify your veterinarian if pet is lethargic, vomits or refuses food.
It is important to stop therapy and contact your veterinarian immediately if you think you pet has a medical problem or side effect from this product’s therapy
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with aspirin, blood thinners, methotrexate, phenylbutazone and probenecid.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, ketoprofen should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about ketoprofen. If you have any questions or concerns about ketoprofen or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Texas West Animal Health

16367 South FM 4,

Santo, TX 76472

Phone. 940-769-2222

Fax. 866-632-3365

Email. texaswestvet@gmail.com