PHARMACEUTICAL INFORMATIONS

Levothyroxine

General Description: Levothyroxine is an oral thyroid hormone medication used in dogs and cats to treat hypothyroidism or other thyroid conditions due to low circulating thyroid hormone. It usually...

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General Description: Levothyroxine is an oral thyroid hormone medication used in dogs and cats to treat hypothyroidism or other thyroid conditions due to low circulating thyroid hormone. It usually needs to be given for the life of the animal. Levothyroixine is available as chewable tablets, as an oral solution, as a powder or as tablets.

What is this drug?

Levothyroxine is a synthetic thyroid hormone
Levothyroxine is given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

To treat conditions associated with low circulating thyroid hormone (hypothyroidism). This is a common disease of middle aged and older pets (where the animal’s thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone)
Cats don’t often receive levothryoxine, but may be prescribed it for a short period to correct overtreatment of hyperthyroidism or if their thyroid gland was surgically removed
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Hyperthyroid animals (pets which produce too much thyroid hormone)
Use with extreme caution in older or debilitated animals, those with heart disease, high blood pressure, anemia, Addison’s disease (hypoadrenocorticism), or diabetes
Pets who have ever had thyrotoxicosis or have an uncontrolled adrenal problem
Pregnant or nursing animals
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to levothyroxine or like products
Directions:

Check with your veterinarian if this product can be given with or without food.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is usually givenonce or twice daily.

Read and follow the label carefully.

There are many different brands of thyroid replacement therapy. Differences do exist between brands. If you must change brands, your veterinarian may need to recheck thyroid hormone levels and adjust dosing accordingly.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

Give any vitamin or mineral supplements an hour before or 4 hours after giving levothyroxine.

It usually needs to given for the life of the animal.

Ensure your pet has fresh, clean drinking water at all times.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

Thyroid hormone levels will need to be monitored with blood tests every few weeks until the dose is stabilized. Blood should be drawn 6-8 hours after the morning dose of medication. Schedule your appointment accordingly. Your veterinarian may also advise periodic liver and kidney function testing.
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

This medication is usually well tolerated by dogs and cats when given at the correct dose
Contact your veterinarian if your pet experiences any of these symptoms: fast heart rate, excessive ingestion of food, inability to tolerate heat, excitability, nervousness, excessive panting. Your pet may be on too high of a dose.
Long term use may cause osteoporosis (bone loss)
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with antidepressants, digoxin, epinephrine, estrogens, insulin, ketamine, norepinephrine and warfarin
If you give your pet sucralfate (Carafate) or aluminum antacids (Maalox, Mylanta), give these products 4 hours before or after giving levothyroxine
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet consumes more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, levothyroxine should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed. It is important to periodically discuss your pet’s response to levothyroxine at regular check ups. Your veterinarian will best determine if your pet is responding as expected and if your pet should continue receiving levothyroxine.

This is just a summary of information about levothyroxine. If you have any questions or concerns about levothyroxine or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Lufenuron

General description: A monthly pet medication which prevents flea infestation. Flavored tablets and an oral liquid are available in a 6 month supply. Lufenuron is also available for cats as an...

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General description: A monthly pet medication which prevents flea infestation. Flavored tablets and an oral liquid are available in a 6 month supply. Lufenuron is also available for cats as an injection performed at your veterinarian’s office. Begin treatment before flea season starts in the spring to ensure your pet doesn’t become infested. Lufenuron does not kill adult fleas, so using an adulticide (ex. nitenpyram) may be desirable.

What is this drug?

Lufenuron is an insect development inhibitor. It interrupts the life cycle of the flea to prevent the continuing reproduction of new generations.
Lufenuron tablets and oral suspension are given by mouth
Lufenuron injectable for cats is administered by your veterinarian under your cat’s skin (a prescription product)
Reasons for prescribing:

For the control of fleas in dogs and cats. Lufenuron does not kill ticks.
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Puppies less than 6 weeks of age; kittens less than 4 weeks of age
Safe for pregnant or nursing animals
Directions:

Give the oral medication as directed by your veterinarian. Your veterinarian will choose the package size appropriate to your pet’s weight. Read and follow the label carefully.

Give this medication on a full stomach.

Mix the oral liquid in approximately two tablespoons of a favorite wet food.

Ensure your pet consumes the entire dose. If it is not entirely consumed, re-dose the full recommended dose as soon as possible.

Lufenuron is given once a month, preferably on the same day of each month. Flea populations are more prevalent in the spring and are often more of a problem in warm, humid areas. Treatment may continue year-round or for as long as flea season lasts in your climate.

To help you remember the monthly dosing, the manufacturer provides reminder stickers for your calendar.

Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy.

Injectable lufenuron is effective for 6 months.

In multi-pet households, all pets should be treated for maximum effectiveness.

There is no successful flea control program that does not involve treating the environment. Discuss with your veterinarian what product to use in your pet’s living space.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

What are the risks and benefits of using this drug?
If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

In order for lufenuron to work, fleas must first bite the pet. This can be a problem in a flea-allergic pet. For these pets, combine lufenuron with a product that actually kills adult fleas.
Upset stomach, causing vomiting, diarrhea and decreased appetite
May also cause itchiness, hives and red skin
Lethargy and depression
Injectable lufenuron may cause injection site reactions (small lump under skin). This may last a few weeks.
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, no known drug interactions have been noted. If lufenuron is used with another flea product (to rapidly kill adults), it is recommended to use one topical and one oral medication at a time. Some flea collars can be used with different products and some cannot. Whenever you use a flea collar, read the label or consult with your veterinarian to find out if it is compatible with the products you are using.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet consumes more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

This is just a summary of information about lufenuron. If you have any questions or concerns about lufenuron or how to treat flea infestations, contact your veterinarian.

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Marbofloxacin

General Description: Marbofloxacin is an oral fluoroquinolone antibiotic used in dogs and cats to treat various bacterial infections (ex. urinary tract, skin and soft tissue infections). Give...

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General Description: Marbofloxacin is an oral fluoroquinolone antibiotic used in dogs and cats to treat various bacterial infections (ex. urinary tract, skin and soft tissue infections). Give marbofloxacin 2 hours before or after any iron, dairy or calcium products. Marbo floxacin is available as 25 mg, 50 mg, 100 mg and 200 mg scored, coated tablets.

What is this drug?

Marbofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Often used in urinary tract, skin and soft tissue infections
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Young, growing dogs due to potential for cartilage abnormalities
Use with caution in animals with liver or kidney conditions, or those suffering dehydration
Breeding, pregnant or nursing animals
Use with caution in cats at high doses
Use with caution in pets with a history of seizures or other central nervous system disorders
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to other quinolones
Directions:

Give marbofloxacin 2 hours before or after any iron, dairy or calcium products.

Ensure there is water available for your pet to drink.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is usually givenonce daily.

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy. Finish the entire course of treatment.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store tablets in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

People should not take this drug. Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Not for use in food animals.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Pet owners who are allergic to quinolones (such as ciprofloxacin or norfloxacin) should avoid handling this drug as a photosensitivity reaction could occur with contact.

Potential side effects:

Decrease in appetite and activity, vomiting, soft stools and diarrhea
Damage to joint cartilage in dogs <8 months="" of="">
Urine crystals in dehydrated pets
High doses of other fluoroquinolones in cats have reportedly caused blindness. Contact your veterinarian if your cat shows any signs of dilated pupils or any change in behavior.
Rare incidences in fluoroquinolones of liver issues, dizziness, seizures, depression, lethargy and nervousness
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with aminoglycosides, antacids, 3rd generation cephalosporins, clindamycin, nitrofurantoin, oral cyclosporine, probenecid, some penicillins, sucralfate, theophylline and medications containing aluminum, calcium, iron, magnesium and zinc.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, marbofloxacin should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about marbofloxacin. If you have any questions or concerns about marbofloxacin or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Meloxicam

General Description: Meloxicam is an oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used in dogs to control pain and inflammation due to osteoarthritis. While meloxicam is not a cure for...

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General Description: Meloxicam is an oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used in dogs to control pain and inflammation due to osteoarthritis. While meloxicam is not a cure for osteoarthritis, it can control the pain and inflammation of osteoarthritis and improve your dog’s mobility. This medication should be given with food. Response varies but in most dogs, improvement will be seen in a few days. Meloxicam is available as an oral syrup in 5 different dropper bottle sizes.

What is this drug?

• Meloxicam is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)

• Given to dogs by mouth

Reasons for prescribing?

• Used to control pain and inflammation (soreness) due to osteoarthritis in dogs [signs include limping or lameness, decreased activity or exercise (reluctance to stand, climb stairs, jump or run or difficulty in performing these activities), stiffness or decreased movement of joints]

What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

• Cats (this medication is for dogs only). Call your veterinarian immediately if your cat receives meloxicam.

• Has had an allergic reaction to the active ingredient meloxicam

• Has had an allergic reaction (such as hives, facial swelling, or red or itchy skin) to aspirin or other NSAIDS.

• Is presently taking aspirin, other NSAIDs, or corticosteroids (unless directed by your veterinarian).

Directions:

The actual dose to be given should be prescribed by the veterinarian.

Shake well before use, then remove cap.

While meloxicam is not a cure for osteoarthritis, it can control the pain and inflammation of OA and improve your dog’s mobility.

Response will vary from dog to dog but can be quite dramatic.

In most dogs, improvement can be seen in a matter of days.

If Meloxicam is discontinued or not given as directed, your dog’s pain and inflammation may come back.

Dogs under 10 pounds (4.5 kg)

To prevent accidental overdosing of small dogs, administer drops on food only, never directly into the mouth. Carefully measure suspension onto food to assure that the correct dose is given before presentation of the food to the dog. The syringe provided with the meloxicam concentration of 0.5 mg/mL cannot be used to measure doses for dogs weighing <1 lb="" (0.45="">

For dogs <1 lb="" (0.45="" kg),="" the="" oral="" suspension="" can="" be="" given="" using="" the="" dropper="" bottle:="" 2="" drops="" for="" each="" lb="" of="" body="" weight="" for="" the="" 0.5="" mg/ml="" concentration="" (5="" drops="" for="" each="" kilogram="" of="" body="" weight),="" dropped="" directly="" onto="" the="">

For dogs between 1-10 pounds, the oral suspension can be given by drops or by using the measuring syringe provided in the package (see dosing procedure below). The syringe fits on to the bottle and has a scale beginning at 1 lb, designed to deliver the daily maintenance dose (0.05 mg/lb or 0.1 mg/kg). When using the syringe, the dog’s weight should be rounded down to the nearest 1 lb increment. Replace and tighten cap after use.

Dogs over 10 pounds (4.5 kg)

Meloxicam may be either mixed with food or placed directly into the mouth. Particular care should be given with regard to the accuracy of dosing. The oral suspension can be given using the measuring syringe provided in the package (see dosing procedure below). The syringe fits on to the bottle and has a scale in pounds designed to deliver the daily maintenance dose (0.05 mg/lb or 0.1 mg/kg). When using the syringe, the dog’s weight should be rounded down to the nearest 1 lb increment. Alternatively, use the dropper bottle: 2 drops for each lb body weight for the 0.5 mg/mL concentration (5 drops for each kilogram of body weight). Replace and tighten cap after use.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask your veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

• The signs of OA you have observed (for example, limping, stiffness)

• The importance of weight control and exercise in the management of OA

• What tests might be done before meloxicam is prescribed

• How often your dog may need to be examined by your veterinarian.

• The risks and benefits of using meloxicam

Tell your veterinarian about:

• Experienced side effects from meloxicam or other NSAIDs, such as aspirin

• Digestive upset (vomiting and/or diarrhea)

• Liver or kidney disease

• A bleeding disorder (for example, von Willebrand’s disease)

• Any other medical problems or allergies that your dog has now or has had

• All medicines that you are giving your dog or plan to give your dog, including those you can get without a prescription

• If your dog is pregnant, nursing or if you plan to breed your dog

Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

For use in dogs only . Do not use in cats.
Potential side effects:

Meloxicam, like other drugs, may cause some side effects. Serious but rare side effects have been reported in dogs taking NSAIDs. Serious side effects can occur with or without warning and in rare situations result in death.

The most common NSAID-related side effects generally involve the stomach and liver or kidney problems. Look for the following side effects that can indicate your dog may be having a problem with Meloxicam or may have another medical problem:

• Decrease or increase in appetite

• Vomiting

• Change in bowel movement (such as diarrhea, or black, tarry or bloody stools)

• Change in behavior (such as decreased or increased activity level, incoordination, seizure or aggression)

• Yellowing of gums, skin, or whites of the eyes (jaundice)

• Change in drinking habits (frequency, amount consumed)

• Change in urination habits (frequency, color, or smell)

• Change in skin (redness, scabs, or scratching)

It is important to stop therapy and contact your veterinarian immediately if you think your dog has a medical problem or side effect from Meloxicam therapy. If you have additional questions about possible side effects, talk to your veterinarian.

Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Meloxicam should not be given with other NSAIDs (for example, aspirin, carprofen, etodolac, deracoxib) or steroids (for example, cortisone, prednisone, dexamethasone, triamcinolone).

Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if your dog eats more than the prescribed amount of Meloxicam.

What else should I know?

This sheet provides a summary of information about Meloxicam. If you have any questions or concerns about Meloxicam or osteoarthritis pain, talk to your veterinarian.

As with all prescribed medicines, Meloxicam should only be given to the dog for which it was prescribed. It should be given to your dog only for the condition for which it was prescribed. It is important to periodically discuss your dog’s response to Meloxicam at regular check ups. Your veterinarian will best determine if your dog is responding as expected and if your dog should continue receiving Meloxicam.

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Methimazole

General Description: Methimazole is an inexpensive drug used in cats to treat an overactive thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism). Your cat’s abnormal appetite, weight loss and heart issues will go back to ...

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General Description: Methimazole is an inexpensive drug used in cats to treat an overactive thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism). Your cat’s abnormal appetite, weight loss and heart issues will go back to normal once the thyroid hormone levels are restored. It is also given as a kidney protectant to dogs receiving cisplatin chemotherapy. It is available in 5 mg scored tablets.

What is this drug?

A drug which blocks the production of thyroid hormones
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

To control hyperthyroidism in the cat
To protect the kidneys in dogs receiving cisplatin chemotherapy
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Use with extreme caution in pets with anemia, clotting disorders, bleeding, low white cell and platelet counts, kidney, liver or immune system diseases
Use with extreme caution in pregnant or nursing pets. The young should be placed on milk replacer after they’ve nursed colostrum (first milk immediately after birth)
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to methimazole or like products
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully. Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. It is usually givenone to three times a day . If your cat will not take tablets, methimazole can be formulated as a flavored liquid to be mixed in the food, or it can be compounded as a gel to be applied on the hairless skin of the inside of your cat’s ear.

Cats: As this drug is not a cure, but is used to control hyperthyroidism, it is usually given for the remainder of the cat’s life.

Before starting therapy, baseline blood work should be performed to assess thyroid levels and your pet’s overall health. Periodic blood work will be necessary to monitor thyroid levels and the drug’s effect on your pet’s health. Dose adjustments will be made based upon these results and an assessment of how your cat is responding clinically.

Transdermal gel: Wear gloves and wash your hands after handling.

Call ahead for refills.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Refrigerate oral suspension.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Owners with low thyroid function should be cautious when handling and should avoid all skin contact.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Any side effects usually occur within the first three months. Side effects may be reduced by beginning at a smaller dose and working up to a full therapeutic dose within a few months. If you notice any of the effects mentioned below, notify your veterinarian.
Decreased appetite, vomiting and lethargy. You may notice these within the first weeks of treatment.
Liver problems (including the above symptoms, plus dark urine, yellowing of the gums, skin or eyes), facial itching resulting in scratching or bleeding tendencies
Underlying kidney disease may become apparent
Rare cases of myasthenia gravis (severely weakened muscles, difficulty swallowing)
Unusually tired, fever (temperature over 103ºF), bruising or bleeding
If you notice any of these symptoms or anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with amitriptyline, beta-blockers, clomipramine, cyclophosphamide, digoxin, metoprolol, modified live vaccines, omeprazole, propanolol, theophylline and warfarin
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, methimazole should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about methimazole. If you have any questions or concerns about methimazole or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Loperamide

General Description: Loperamide is an affordable drug used in dogs and cats to stop diarrhea. It may also be used to treat acute colitis and malabsorption or maldigestion problems. Loperamide is...

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General Description: Loperamide is an affordable drug used in dogs and cats to stop diarrhea. It may also be used to treat acute colitis and malabsorption or maldigestion problems. Loperamide is available over-the-counter in many forms. Consult with your veterinarian to find the product that would suit your pet’s needs the best.

What is this drug?

A gastrointestinal motility modifier; member of the opiate class
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Slows down movement in the intestines to stop diarrhea
May also be used to treat acute colitis and malabsorption or maldigestion problems
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Use with caution in cats: may cause central nervous system excitation
Use with caution in debilitated or geriatric pets
Safety is unknown in pregnant pets
Pets who have received MAOIs within the last 14 days
Do not use in pets with diarrheas involving intestinal toxins (ex. parvovirus, or liver failure, etc.)
Do not use in pets with a gastrointestinal or urinary tract obstruction
Avoid use of loperamide in collies and related breeds. They can exhibit loperamide toxicity.
Use with caution in pets with severe kidney disease, hypothyroidism, Addison’s disease, head trauma, acute abdomen or with acute respiratory disease
If your pet has had an earlier allergic reaction to loperamide or like products
Directions:

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. It is usually givenonce to three times a day .

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give this medication for as long as veterinarian directs. Do not skip doses or stop giving the medication without consulting your veterinarian.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Possible side effects:

Drowsiness is possible
Constipation or bloating
May falsely elevate laboratory tests that check for pancreatitis (amylase and lipase levels)
May cause central nervous system excitation
If you notice any of these symptoms or anything else unusual, discontinue loperamide and contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with antihistamines, MAOIs (ex. Anipryl, Preventic Flea Collar), and tranquillizers.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, loperamide should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about loperamide. If you have any questions or concerns about loperamide or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Lufenuron + Milbemycin oxime

General description: A monthly pill which prevents flea infestation and heartworm and kills parasites such as hookworms, roundworms and whipworms. Flavored tablets are available in a 6 or 12 month...

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General description: A monthly pill which prevents flea infestation and heartworm and kills parasites such as hookworms, roundworms and whipworms. Flavored tablets are available in a 6 or 12 month supply. Lufenuron and milbemycin does not kill adult fleas, so using an adulticide (ex. nitenpyram) may be desirable.

What is this drug?

Milbemycin oxime eliminates the tissue stage of heartworm larvae and the adult stage of hookworm, roundworm and whipworm infestations
Lufenuron is an insect development inhibitor. It interrupts the life cycle of the flea to prevent the continuing reproduction of new generations
Lufenuron and milbemycin flavored tablets are given by mouth
May be given with nitenpyram (Capstar®) to kill adult fleas.
Reasons for prescribing:

To prevent heartworm disease and roundworm, hookworm and whipworm infections in dogs
To prevent and control flea infestations in dogs
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

This product is not approved for use in cats
Puppies less than 4 weeks of age
Dogs with a body weight less than 2 pounds
Dogs who have tested positive for heartworm
Safe for all breeds of dogs
Safe for breeding, pregnant or nursing animals
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to lufenuron or milbemycin or like products
Directions:

Give the oral medication as directed by your veterinarian. Your veterinarian will choose the package size appropriate to your pet’s weight. Read and follow the label carefully.

Give this medication with a meal.

Ensure your pet consumes the entire dose. If it is not entirely consumed, re-dose the full recommended dose as soon as possible.

Lufenuron and milbemycin is given once a month, preferably on the same day of each month. Administer from the onset of flea and mosquito seasons. Treatment may continue year-round or for as long as flea and mosquito seasons lasts in your climate. Discuss this with your veterinarian.

If the animal vomits within 2 hours of the dose, and you feel it is unrelated to the medication, give another dose.

Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy.

In multi-pet households all pets should be treated for maximum effectiveness.

If this product replaces another type of heartworm preventive, the first dose must be given within 30 days after the last dose of the previous product.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time. If you miss more than 8 weeks in a row, give the drug as soon as you remember, but you should have your pet’s blood tested for heartworms within 6 months (as infection may have occurred).

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

What tests may need to be performed prior to treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug?
If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Remove tablet from original pack only at time of administration.

Humans should maintain good personal hygiene as hookworm and roundworm infections could easily be contracted.

Do not allow pets to eat rodents or raw flesh or fish. Pet feces should be removed daily and the premises kept clean.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

A mild, transient hypersensitivity reaction (labored breathing, vomiting, salivation and lethargy) has been noted in some dogs carrying a large number of circulating microfilariae (immature heartworm). These reactions are likely due to the parasites dying all at once.
In order for lufenuron and milbemycin to work against fleas, fleas must first bite the pet. This can be a problem in a flea-allergic pet. For these pets, combine lufenuron and milbemycin with a product that actually kills adult fleas (ex. nitenpyram). Upset stomach, vomiting, diarrhea, drooling and decreased appetite
May also cause itchiness, hives and red skin, lethargy, depression, staggering, convulsions, weakness
More serious side effects could occur in a dog with preexisting heartworm infection
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, no known drug interactions have been noted. If lufenuron and milbemycin is used with another flea product (to rapidly kill adults), it is recommended to use one topical and one oral medication at a time. Some flea collars can be used with different products and some cannot. Whenever you use a flea collar, read the label or consult with your veterinarian to find out if it is compatible with the products you are using.
Do not give this product if your dog is already taking heartworm medication.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet consumes more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, lufenuron and milbemycin should only be given to the dog for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about lufenuron and milbemycin. If you have any questions or concerns about lufenuron and milbemycin or the conditions for which it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Megesterol

General Description: Megesterol is a synthetic progesterone used in dogs to treat false pregnancies and post-pone heat cycles. It may be used in cats to treat various behavior problems (ex....

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General Description: Megesterol is a synthetic progesterone used in dogs to treat false pregnancies and post-pone heat cycles. It may be used in cats to treat various behavior problems (ex. inter-male aggression, inappropriate urination, aggression towards people). It is also used to treat some skin conditions. Not for use in pregnant animals. Megesterol is available in two strengths: 5 mg and 20 mg tablets.

What is this drug?

A synthetic chemical similar to the female hormone progesterone
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

To post-pone estrus (female’s heat cycle) and alleviate false pregnancies in dogs
To treat some skin conditions (ex. endocrine alopecia, psychogenic alopecia)
To treat various behavior problems (ex. inter-male aggression, inappropriate urination, aggression towards people)
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Not for use in pregnant animals, those with reproductive disease, diabetes or mammary cancer
Should not be used in dogs prior to or during their first heat cycle
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to megesterol or like products
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

May be given whole, or crushed and mixed with food.

Ensure your pet has fresh, clean drinking water at all times.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. It is usually givenonce a day .

Give this medication for as long as veterinarian directs. Do not skip doses or stop giving the medication without consulting your veterinarian.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily.

Periodic blood work to monitor this drug’s effect may be required if your pet is undergoing long- term therapy.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has a history of blood clots, Addison’s disease or congestive heart failure
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Not for human use.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Megesterol should not be given for more than two consecutive treatments.

Potential side effects:

Excessive thirst, excessive urination, personality changes, drowsiness, vaginal discharge, yellow gums and weight gain
Hair color change (dogs)
Contact your veterinarian if mammary changes (mammary enlargement, milk production) occur, or if any other side effects are noted
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with insulin and rifampin
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, megesterol should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about megesterol. If you have any questions or concerns about megesterol or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Meropenem

General Description: Meropenem. has been prescribed for your pet for the treatment of an infection caused by susceptible bacteria because other less expensive antibiotics were not effective or...

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General Description: Meropenem. has been prescribed for your pet for the treatment of an infection caused by susceptible bacteria because other less expensive antibiotics were not effective or unacceptable because of their adverse effects. Meropenem. is supplied in 20 mL and 30 mL injection vials containing sufficient meropenem to deliver 500 mg or 1 g, respectively.

What is this drug?

A carbapenem antibiotic
Most often given by intravenous injection at veterinary hospitals
Reasons for prescribing:

Used for the treatment of an infection caused by susceptible bacteria because other less expensive antibiotics were not effective or unacceptable because of their adverse effects.
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Use with caution in pregnant pets
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to penicillin or another antibiotic
Directions:

Meropenem is normally given in the hospital two to three times daily.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

The dry powder should be stored at controlled room temperature 20-25ºC (68-77ºF)

Freshly prepared solutions of meropenem should be used whenever possible. However, constituted solutions maintain satisfactory potency at controlled room temperature 15-25ºC (59- 77°F) or under refrigeration at 4°C (39°F). Solutions of intravenous meropenem should not be frozen.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

People with allergies to antibiotics should not handle this drug since allergic reactions could occur from contact.

Potential side effects:

Meropenem is generally well-tolerated, but there may be a slight hair color change at the injection site
Nausea, decreased appetite, vomiting and diarrhea may be experienced
Allergic reactions are rare, but if your pet shows irregular breathing, rash, fever, hives, scratching, puffiness or facial swelling, or anything else unusual, stop therapy and contact your veterinarian immediately.
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with probenecid
C ompatibility of meropenem with other drugs has not been established. Do not mix meropenem with or physically add to intravenous solutions containing other drugs.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

This is just a summary of information about meropenem. If you have any questions or concerns about meropenem or for the condition it was prescribed, talk to your veterinarian.

As with all prescribed medicines, meropenem should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

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Methylprednisolone

General Description: Methylprednisolone is an anti-inflammatory agent used to treat many inflammatory, autoimmune and allergy conditions and many other diseases. For use in both dogs and cats.

What...

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General Description: Methylprednisolone is an anti-inflammatory agent used to treat many inflammatory, autoimmune and allergy conditions and many other diseases. For use in both dogs and cats.

What is this drug?

A long-acting anti-inflammatory synthetic glucocorticoid
Has anti-inflammatory and anti-allergy properties
Given by mouth or as an injection by your veterinarian (may be repeated every few weeks)
Reasons for prescribing:

Used to treat many conditions including allergies, inflammation, colitis, various endocrine, kidney and dermatologic conditions, ophthalmic and respiratory diseases
Used to treat some cancers, anemias and auto-immune diseases
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Animals with a systemic fungal infection
Animals with some types of mange (mites)
Injectable methylprednisolone should not be given to pets with low platelets nor injected into infected joints or other infected areas
Pets with stomach ulcers, corneal ulcers, osteoporosis, high blood pressure, liver and kidney disease or congestive heart failure
Pets with serious bacterial or viral infections
Pets with Cushing’s disease should only receive this medication during very stressful events
Do not use in pregnant animals or in breeding males
Use with caution in very young animals and diabetics
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to methylprednisolone or other glucocorticoids
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

Oral forms: Give oral forms with food to reduce the chance of stomach ulcers.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. If given just once daily, dogs usually receive glucocorticoid drugs in the morning, and cats receive it in the evening (this mimics their natural hormone cycles).

Your pet may start at a high dose and then have it reduced. Methylprednisolone may be prescribed for several weeks or even months. Individualization of dosage and duration of treatment will depend upon your pet’s reaction to this drug.

It is important that the dose be tapered to an every other day schedule once the condition is controlled and the body can start to make its own cortisol again. Do not discontinue the drug abruptly.

Periodic blood work to monitor this drug’s effect may be required if your pet is undergoing long- term therapy.

Ensure your pet has fresh, clean drinking water at all times.

Call ahead for refills.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Not for human use.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Most common side effects are increased thirst, appetite and urination. Your pet may have accidents and need to go outside or use the litter box more frequently. Discuss these side effects with your veterinarian as the dose may be lowered or another steroid could be selected.
Less serious side effects include weight gain, insomnia, stomach upset, diarrhea, vomiting, fatigue or dizziness, muscle weakness or joint pain, problems with diabetes control
Rare side effects include cataracts, glaucoma or behavior changes
May stunt growth if used in young, growing animals
If your pet has received high doses, it should not be vaccinated without your veterinarian’s advice as the vaccine may not work or it may actually give your pet the disease you are trying to prevent
Glucocorticoid drugs may lead to immune system suppression, making your pet more susceptible to infections. Contact your veterinarian if your pet has a fever (over 103ºF), painful or frequent urination, fatigue, sneezing, coughing or runny eyes.
Long-term therapy in some animals may cause Cushing’s disease. Typical signs include weakness, muscle loss, darkened thin skin, poor hair coat and a ‘pot belly’. Monitoring tests or changing therapy may be recommended.
Some pets become aggressive while on methylprednisolone
If these symptoms persist or you notice anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with anticholinesterase agents, amphotericin B, cyclosporine, cyclophosphamide, digitalis glycosides, erythromycin, furosemide, insulin, mitotane, NSAIDS (aspirin, carprofen, deracoxib, etc.), phenobarbital, phenytoin, rifampin and some vaccines.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, methylprednisolone should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about methylprednisolone. If you have any questions or concerns about methylprednisolone or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Metoclopramide

General Description: Metoclopramide is an affordable drug used in dogs and cats to prevent nausea, vomiting and esophageal reflux (stomach acid backing up into the throat). It helps move food and...

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General Description: Metoclopramide is an affordable drug used in dogs and cats to prevent nausea, vomiting and esophageal reflux (stomach acid backing up into the throat). It helps move food and hairballs from the stomach into the intestines. It is also used during cancer chemotherapy to prevent vomiting and other side effects. Metoclopramide is available in 5 mg and 10 mg tablets or as an oral syrup, 1 mg and 10 mg/mL.

What is this drug?

Upper gastrointestinal tract motility stimulant; anti-emetic
May be given by injection in the veterinary clinic or may be given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

To prevent nausea and vomiting by normalizing stomach motility
Moves food and hairballs from the stomach into the intestines
Prevent esophageal reflux (stomach acid backing up into the esophagus)
Used after surgery and during cancer chemotherapy to prevent nausea and vomiting
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Avoid using in pregnant or nursing pets
Pets with pheochromocytoma (a rare adrenal tumor)
Pets with a history of seizures. Metoclopramide may cause seizures in these pets.
Pets suspected to have a stomach or intestinal obstruction, bleeding or perforation
Use with caution in pets with kidney disease, diabetes or high blood pressure or recent stomach surgery
If your pet has had an earlier allergic reaction to metoclopramide or like products (ex. PABA sunscreens)
Directions:

Metoclopramide should be given 20-30 minutes before a meal. Give each dose with plenty of water.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. It is usually giventhree to four times a day .

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give this medication for as long as veterinarian directs. Do not skip doses or stop giving the medication without consulting your veterinarian.

Oral suspensions are available but notoriously unpalatable to pets.

Call ahead for refills.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Metoclopramide is very similar to the sunscreen ingredient PABA. Humans allergic to sunscreens should avoid contact with metoclopramide.

Possible side effects:

Animals predisposed to seizures may experience seizures. This should not happen in ‘normal’ animals.
Drowsiness, or marked hyperactivity, frenzy and/or disorientation
Constipation, behavior and attitude changes
If you notice any of these symptoms or anything else unusual, discontinue metoclopramide and contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with acetaminophen, aspirin/acetylsalicylic acid, atropine, cimetidine, cyclosporine, diazepam, digoxin, insulin, MAOIs (ex. Anipryl, Preventic Flea Collar), narcotic analgesics, phenothiazine tranquillizers (ex. acepromazine), probantheline bromide, sedatives and tetracycline.
Since metoclopramide increases the movement of gastrointestinal contents, it can affect the absorption rates of many oral drugs
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, metoclopramide should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about metoclopramide. If you have any questions or concerns about metoclopramide or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Metronidazole

General Description: Metronidazole is an oral antibiotic used in dogs and cats to kill some intestinal parasites, especially Giardia spp. It is also used to treat diarrhea and infections caused by...

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General Description: Metronidazole is an oral antibiotic used in dogs and cats to kill some intestinal parasites, especially Giardia spp. It is also used to treat diarrhea and infections caused by anerobic bacteria. This medication has a bitter taste. Disguising it with food may help you administer this drug successfully. Metronidazole is available as an oral liquid or as tablets.

What is this drug?

Metronidazole is an antibiotic and an antiprotozoal
Metronidazole is given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Effective against certain protozoal infections, especially Giardia
Used to treat colitis/inflammatory bowel disease
Used to treat central nervous system and oral/dental infections
Used as an anti-diarrhea medication
Used sometimes in cancer radiotherapy
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Pregnant or nursing animals
Use with extreme caution in debilitated or geriatric pets or those with liver or kidney disease
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to metronidazole or like products before
Directions:

For liquids, shake well before accurately measuring the dose.

Give this medication with food. Because the tablets have a natural bitter taste, they should not be crushed or chewed as the pet will drool plus likely refuse future doses. After administration, watch the pet closely to ensure the entire dose was consumed.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is usually givenonce or twice daily. The length of therapy depends upon the disease condition as well as the pet’s response to metronidazole.

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy.

Give this medication for as long as your veterinarian directs. Finish the entire course of treatment.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store tablets in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Oral liquids should be stored in the refrigerator. Shake well before using.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Generally side effects are not seen unless the pet is taking a very high dose or for a prolonged period of time (months). Side effects seen are:

Decrease in appetite, nausea, diarrhea
Anemia
Liver damage (yellowing of gums, eyes, skin)
Blood in the urine
Weakness, stumbling, knuckling of the paws, head tilt to one side, dilated pupils, bizarre back and forth movements of the eye (called nystagmus), or seizures (cats)
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian

Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with cimetidine, oral blood thinners, phenobarbital, phenytoin, sedatives or tranquilizers, and products with alcohol as an ingredient.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, metronidazole should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

Metronidazole normally has a strong sulfurous odor which may smell like cat urine.

This is just a summary of information about metronidazole. If you have any questions or concerns about metronidazole or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Milbemycin oxime otic

General description: An effective ear mite treatment for your cat. Each foil pouch contains two plastic dispensing tubes of solution, one for each ear. A single dose is often enough.

What is this...

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General description: An effective ear mite treatment for your cat. Each foil pouch contains two plastic dispensing tubes of solution, one for each ear. A single dose is often enough.

What is this drug?

Milbemycin oxime is a strong drug able to interfere with a parasite’s nerve transmission, causing death of many forms of parasites
This otic solution is applied to the ear
Reasons for prescribing:

Used to treat ear mites in cats older than 4 weeks of age (not approved for use in dogs)
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Kittens less than 4 weeks of age
Safety has not been established in breeding, pregnant or nursing cats
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to milbemycin or like products
Directions:

Administer this medication as directed by your veterinarian. Read and follow the label carefully.

Each foil pouch contains two tubes of solution, one for each ear. Cleaning of the external ear canal prior to treatment may be performed, but is not necessary.

Apply the contents of one tube topically into each external ear canal. Massage the base of the ear after application in order to distribute the medication fully.

Repeat once if necessary (if immature ear mites hatch after treatment).

What if dose is missed?

Not applicable

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

What tests may need to be performed prior to treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug?
If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If you pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Ear irritation
Vomiting
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, no known drug interactions have been noted.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet is exposed to more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, milbemycin should only be given to the cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about milbemycin. If you have any questions or concerns about milbemycin or the conditions for which it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Mitotane

General Description: Mitotane stops the growth of cells in the adrenal gland. It is used in treatment of Cushing’s disease in dogs and also to treat some types of cancer affecting the adrenal gland....

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General Description: Mitotane stops the growth of cells in the adrenal gland. It is used in treatment of Cushing’s disease in dogs and also to treat some types of cancer affecting the adrenal gland. Pregnant women, or those wishing to conceive should not handle this drug. It is available in 500 mg scored tablets.

What is this drug?

An adrenocortical cytotoxicant
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

For the treatment of hyperadrenocorticism (Cushing’s disease) in dogs
For treatment of some types of cancer affecting the adrenal cortex
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Use with caution in pets with diabetes, liver or kidney disease
Pregnant or nursing dogs
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to mitotane or like products before
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

Wear gloves when handling this medication. Wash hands well after handling this drug.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Give mitotane with a fatty or oily meal (to increase absorption). Mitotane powders and liquids sprinkled on food with a little corn oil is an effective way to give the drug. But if your dog has been well-managed on whole tablets, switching to a liquid or powder, or giving a crushed tablet, could dramatically increase the amount of active ingredient that enters the bloodstream. Do not switch forms unless under close supervision by your veterinarian.

Your pet will receive high doses for the first 1-2 weeks, and then the dose will be lowered under the direction of your veterinarian.

Mitotane decreases the body’s ability to handle stress. Glucocorticoids (ex. prednisone) may be prescribed for use during stressful situations (ex. travel, surgery, house guests, new baby, etc.).

Expect to see the signs of hyperadrenocorticism (lethargy, increased drinking, eating, or urination) improve within the first 2 weeks of treatment. Skin and hair loss changes may take several months to improve.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced anemia, liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced diabetes or any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant childproof container at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Do not handle this product if you are pregnant or trying to conceive.

Wear gloves when handling this medication. Wash hands well after handling this drug. It can be very toxic. Do not allow mitotane to enter the environment through the soil or water. Return any leftover drug to your veterinarian for proper disposal.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Most common effects: lethargy, weakness, loss of appetite, incoordination, depression, vomiting and diarrhea. Mitotane must be given in high doses until it starts to work. Most dogs will have an effect within 2-35 days, whereby the dose can be reduced from twice daily to twice a week. If your pet becomes unusually tired or weak, contact your veterinarian immediately.
Possible liver damage (loss of appetite, yellowing of gums, eyes or skin) especially in pets with a pre-existing liver condition
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with barbiturates, CNS depressants (ex. acepromazine, amitriptyline), insulin, phenobarbital, phenytoin, prednisone, prednisolone, spironolactone, theophylline, and warfarin
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, mitotane should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about mitotane. If you have any questions or concerns about mitotane or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Nitenpyram

General description: An oral tablet for dogs and cats which kills adult fleas within 30 minutes. Nitenpyram is available in packages of 6. This product can be used in conjunction with lufenuron as...

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General description: An oral tablet for dogs and cats which kills adult fleas within 30 minutes. Nitenpyram is available in packages of 6. This product can be used in conjunction with lufenuron as part of a complete flea management system.

What is this drug?

Nitenpyram belongs to the chemical class of neonicotinoids
Nitenpyram tablets are given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Used to kill adult fleas on dogs and cats
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Puppies and kittens less than 4 weeks of age and 2 pounds of body weight
Safe for pregnant or nursing animals
Directions:

Give this medication as directed by your veterinarian. Your veterinarian will choose the package size appropriate to your pet’s weight. Read and follow the label carefully.

A single dose will kill the adult fleas on your pet. If your pet gets re-infested with fleas, you may safely give another dose as often as once a day. Nitenpyram does not have an effect on fleas in the pet’s environment. You may need to treat more than once because immature fleas in your pet’s living space will continue to develop into adults that can re-infest your pet.

Nitenpyram works well with an insect grown inhibitor like lufenuron to prevent and control flea eggs from hatching.

Give this pill directly in your pet’s mouth or you may hide it in food.

Ensure your pet consumes the entire dose. If it is not entirely consumed, it is safe to re-dose the full recommended dose as soon as possible.

Nitenpyram will begin to work within 30 minutes.

In multi-pet households, all pets should be treated for maximum effectiveness.

There is no successful flea control program that does not involve treating the environment. Discuss with your veterinarian what product to use in your pet’s living space.

What if dose is missed?

Not applicable

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

What are the risks and benefits of using this drug?
If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If you pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

After treatment, you may notice that your pet will scratch itself as the fleas begin to die. This behavior is temporary and a reaction to the fleas dying off rather than the drug. Rarely, in some cats, this reaction shows as hyperactivity, panting, vocalization and excessive grooming.
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, no known drug interactions have been noted.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet consumes more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

This is just a summary of information about nitenpyram. If you have any questions or concerns about nitenpyram or how to treat flea infestations, contact your veterinarian.

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Metoprolol tartrate

General Description: Metoprolol is a beta-blocker used to treat (or prevent) your pet’s cardiac arrhythmias (irregular heart rhythm) and various other cardiac conditions. Available in 50 and 100 mg...

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General Description: Metoprolol is a beta-blocker used to treat (or prevent) your pet’s cardiac arrhythmias (irregular heart rhythm) and various other cardiac conditions. Available in 50 and 100 mg tablets, or in extended release tablets as 50, 100 and 200 mg tablets.

What is this drug?

Metoprolol is a beta-blocker
Metoprolol is given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Used to treat some heart diseases (ex. irregular heart beat)
Slows and regulates the heart rate and causes the heart to work more efficiently
Reduces cardiac output and lowers blood pressure
Used to treat some dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Pets with heart block, a slow heart rate, sinus node dysfunction or congestive heart failure
Use with caution in diabetics or those with liver or kidney disease
Use with caution in animals with some types of lung disease (ex. asthma)
Safety in pregnancy has not been established
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to metoprolol or any other beta-blocker
Directions:

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. In dogs this medication is usually given two or three times daily and once daily to cats.

This drug is seldom used in cats as it is very difficult to accurately dose them.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

Because metoprolol is often given with other drugs, a lower initial dose may be prescribed.

The duration of administration depends on the condition being treated, response to the medication and the development of any adverse effects. Do not discontinue the drug abruptly or without directions from your veterinarian, as your pet’s condition may worsen. If your pet is taken off this drug, a gradual withdrawal is advised. Reduce exercise during this period.

Periodic blood work to monitor this drug’s effect may be required.

Call ahead for refills.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store medication in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

The most common side effects occur in geriatric patients. These include low heart rate, tiredness, depression, diarrhea, low blood sugar, worsening heart failure
Low blood pressure which would cause fainting, weakness or dizziness. Hot weather, exercise or fever may increase these effects.
May constrict the bronchi, causing coughing, wheezing or difficulty breathing
High blood pressure patients: Initially, patients may feel fatigue, but this will lessen in a few weeks. Continue the medicine unless the pet experiences other symptoms. Contact your veterinarian if this is the case.
If your pet collapses or you notice anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with aloe, anesthetic agents, barbiturates, bupivicaine, cimetidine, dopamine, epinephrine, diphenhydramine, furosemide, hydralazine, insulin, indomethacin, lidocaine, methimazole, other heart medications (ex. digoxin, diltiazem, verapamil), norepinephrine, phenothiazines (tranquilizers), quinidine, rifampin, some SSRI’s (ex. fluoxetine, paroxetine), phenylpropanolamine, propylthiouracil and terbinafine
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, metoprolol should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

It is likely that your veterinarian will want to monitor your pet’s condition periodically.

This is just a summary of information about metoprolol. If you have any questions or concerns about metoprolol or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Milbemycin oxime

General description: A monthly pill which prevents heartworm and kills parasites such as hookworm, roundworm and whipworm. Flavored tablets are available for both dogs and cats in a 6 or 12 month...

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General description: A monthly pill which prevents heartworm and kills parasites such as hookworm, roundworm and whipworm. Flavored tablets are available for both dogs and cats in a 6 or 12 month supply.

What is this drug?

Milbemycin is a strong drug able to interfere with a parasite’s nerve transmission, causing death of many forms of parasites
Milbemycin flavored tablets are given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

To prevent heartworm disease and roundworm, hookworm and whipworm infections in dogs
To prevent heartworm disease and roundworm and hookworm infections in cats
To treat certain types of mange
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Puppies less than 4 weeks of age; kittens less than 6 weeks of age
Dogs with a body weight less than 2 pounds; cats with a body weight less than 1.5 pounds
Pets who have tested positive for heartworm
Safe for all breeds of dogs and cats
Safe for breeding, pregnant or nursing dogs, but safety has not been established in breeding, pregnant or nursing cats
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to milbemycin or like products
Directions:

Give as directed by your veterinarian. Your veterinarian will choose the package size appropriate to your pet’s weight. Read and follow the label carefully.

This medication can be given as a treat or with a meal. Tablets may be broken for ease of administration.

Ensure your pet consumes the entire dose. If it is not entirely consumed, re-dose the full recommended dose as soon as possible.

Milbemycin is given once a month, preferably on the same day of each month. Administer within one month of the pet’s first exposure to mosquitoes and monthly thereafter. The medication kills the parasites acquired during the previous month. Treatment may continue year-round or until the end of the mosquito season. Discuss this with your veterinarian.

If the animal vomits within 2 hours of the dose, and you feel it is unrelated to the medication, give another dose.

Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy.

If this product replaces another type of heartworm preventive, the first dose must be given within 30 days after the last dose of the previous product.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time. If you miss more than 8 weeks in a row, give the drug as soon as you remember, but you should have your pet’s blood tested for heartworms within 6 months (as infection may have occurred).

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

What tests may need to be performed prior to treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug?
If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If you pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Remove tablet from original pack only at time of administration.

Humans should maintain good personal hygiene as hookworm and roundworm infections could easily be contracted.

Do not allow pets to eat rodents or raw flesh or fish. Pet feces should be removed daily and the premises kept clean.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

A mild, transient hypersensitivity reaction (labored breathing, vomiting, salivation and lethargy) has been noted in some dogs carrying a large number of circulating microfilariae (immature heartworm). These reactions are likely due to the parasites dying all at once.
May also cause itchiness, hives and red skin, lethargy, depression, staggering, convulsions, weakness
More serious side effects could occur in a dog with preexisting heartworm infection
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, no known drug interactions have been noted.
Do not give this product if your dog is already taking heartworm medication.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet consumes more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, milbemycin should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about milbemycin. If you have any questions or concerns about milbemycin or the conditions for which it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Misoprostol

General Description: Misoprostol is used in dogs and cats to prevent or treat stomach ulcers, especially in pets taking NSAIDs. Other uses include: controlling allergic skin diseases in dogs (in...

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General Description: Misoprostol is used in dogs and cats to prevent or treat stomach ulcers, especially in pets taking NSAIDs. Other uses include: controlling allergic skin diseases in dogs (in combination with other drugs) and for the protection of the kidneys in pets taking the drug cyclosporine.

What is this drug?

A synthetic prostaglandin analog; protects the gastric lining and inhibits gastric acid secretion
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Used to prevent and treat stomach ulcers, especially those caused by the use of NSAIDs (ex. aspirin, etodolac, deracoxib, etc.)
May be used in combination with other drugs to control allergic skin diseases in dogs
Decreases the toxic effects to the kidneys resulting from the use of the drug cyclosporine
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Pregnant animals – miscarriage can result.
Do not give to animals nursing young
Do not use in animals with blood vessel conditions in the heart or brain. These animals could suffer seizures or very low blood pressure.
Use with caution in pets with a history of seizures
If your pet has had an earlier allergic reaction to misoprostol or like products
Directions:

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. It is usually giventhree times a day and can be used long-term.

Read and follow the label carefully.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily.

If your pet is suffering any side effects, give with food. This will delay absorption.

Give this medication for as long as veterinarian directs. Do not skip doses or stop giving the medication without consulting your veterinarian.

Do not give to pregnant pets as miscarriage can result.

Call ahead for refills.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Misoprostol can cause miscarriage in pregnant women. If you are pregnant, do not handle this drug.

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Possible side effects:

Stomach upset (vomiting and diarrhea). Flatulence and abdominal pain are possible too. These signs should be temporary and resolve in a few days. If these symptoms persist or are severe, contact your veterinarian for advice.
Possible uterine cramps and vaginal bleeding in unspayed female dogs. Contact your veterinarian immediately should you see these symptoms.
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with magnesium-containing antacids, vitamins and supplements
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, misoprostol should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about misoprostol. If you have any questions or concerns about misoprostol or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Moxidectin

General Description: Moxidectin is an injectable parasiticde given at the veterinary clinic to dogs 6 months of age and older to prevent heartworm disease continuously for 6 months. It also treats...

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General Description: Moxidectin is an injectable parasiticde given at the veterinary clinic to dogs 6 months of age and older to prevent heartworm disease continuously for 6 months. It also treats common hookworm infections. Dogs should be tested for heartworm disease prior to treatment.

What is this drug?

• Moxidectin is an injectable parasiticide

Reasons for prescribing?

• Used in dogs six months of age and older to prevent heartworm disease(Dirofilaria immitis) continuously for six months and to treat common hookworm infections (Ancylostoma caninum and Uncinaria stenocephala) .

What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

• Sick, debilitated or underweight animals

• Use with caution in dogs with pre-existing allergic disease, including previous vaccine reactions, food allergy, atopy, and flea allergy dermatitis. Dogs should be tested for heartworm disease prior to being treated with moxidectin. If your dog tests positive for adult heartworms, your veterinarian should treat the infection with an appropriate medication before administering moxidectin.

Directions:

Your veterinarian will calculate how much medication your dog will require.

The injection is given subcutaneously (under the skin).

Heartworm:

Initial injections should be given within 1 month of your dog’s first exposure to mosquitoes. Follow up treatments may be given every 6 months if your dog has continued exposure to mosquitoes, and your dog continues to be healthy without weight loss.

When replacing another heartworm preventive product, moxidection should be given within 1 month of the last dose of the former medication.

Hookworm:

Moxidectin el minates larval and adult stages of 2 types of hookworms. Re-infection may occur sooner than 6 months.

What to tell/ask your veterinarian before giving medication?

Your veterinarian is your best resource for recommending appropriate medications for your dog. It is important to discuss your dog’s health history with your veterinarian so he/she can decide if moxidectin is right for your dog.

Storage and Warnings:

Not applicable

Potential side effects?

• Severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxis): facial swelling, itching, difficulty breathing, collapse

• Lethargy (sluggishness), not eating or losing interest in food, any change in activity level

• Seizures

• Vomiting and/or diarrhea (with and without blood)

• Weight loss

• Pale gums, increased thirst or urination, weakness, bleeding, bruising

• Rare instances of death

If you notice any of these side effects or have any concerns about your dog, please contact your veterinarian as soon as possible.

Can this drug be given with other drugs?

In well-controlled clinical studies, moxidectin was used safely in dogs receiving other veterinary products such as anthelmintics, antiparasitics, antibiotics, analgesics, steroids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), anesthetics, and flea control products. Moxidectin should not be given within one month of your dog being vaccinated. Tell your veterinarian about all medicines you have given your dog in the past, and any medicines that you are planning to use with moxidectin.

What else should I know?

This sheet provides a summary of information about moxidectin. If you have any questions or concerns about moxidectin, talk to your veterinarian.

Several studies have shown that by the end of the six-month treatment period, the amount of moxidectin remaining in the body is too small to measure. An additional study demonstrated that after four consecutive treatments there was no accumulation of moxidectin over time.

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Omeprazole

General Description: Omeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor (or strong antacid) to help treat stomach ulcers and prevent future ulcers. Reduce the amount of stomach acid produced to better manage your ...

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General Description: Omeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor (or strong antacid) to help treat stomach ulcers and prevent future ulcers. Reduce the amount of stomach acid produced to better manage your pet’s ulcers. Omeprazole works not only when the stomach is full and digesting, but all of the time. Pre-calibrated syringes are available in boxes of 7 or 72 units.

What is this drug?

A proton pump inhibitor; suppresses acid production in the stomach
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Used to treat and prevent gastroduodenal ulcers
Used in conditions in which there is too much acid in the stomach
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Use with caution in pets with liver or kidney disease
Animals less than 4 weeks of age
Safety during pregnancy and nursing is unknown
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to omeprazole or like products
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. It is usually givenonce a day.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily.

If using capsules, do not open the capsules or crush the pellets inside. The pellets can be mixed with fruit juices, but not water or milk.

Long term usage (greater than 4 weeks) is not recommended.

Give this medication for as long as veterinarian directs. Do not skip doses or stop giving the medication without consulting your veterinarian.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Loss of appetite, stomach ache, nausea, vomiting, gas and diarrhea
If these symptoms persist or you notice anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with ampicillin, diazepam, iron salts, ketoconazole, phenytoin and warfarin.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, omeprazole should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about omeprazole. If you have any questions or concerns about omeprazole or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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FIND US

Texas West Animal Health

16367 South FM 4,

Santo, TX 76472

Phone. 940-769-2222

Fax. 866-632-3365

Email. texaswestvet@gmail.com