PHARMACEUTICAL INFORMATIONS

Orbifloxacin

General Description: Orbifloxacin is an oral fluoroquinolone antibiotic used in dogs and cats to treat various bacterial infections (ex. ear, skin and soft tissue infections). Orbifloxacin tablets...

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General Description: Orbifloxacin is an oral fluoroquinolone antibiotic used in dogs and cats to treat various bacterial infections (ex. ear, skin and soft tissue infections). Orbifloxacin tablets are enteric coated to hide the natural bitter taste. Give this medication on an empty stomach. Orbifloxacin is available as 5.7 mg, 22.7 mg and 68 mg tablets.

What is this drug?

Orbifloxacin is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Often used in ear, skin and soft tissue infections
Effective against many bacteria types and uses lower doses than some fluoroquinolones, therefore fewer tablets/cost
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Young, growing dogs due to potential for cartilage abnormalities
Use with caution in animals with liver or kidney conditions, or those suffering dehydration
Breeding, pregnant or nursing animals
Use with caution in cats at high doses
Use with caution in pets with a history of seizures or other central nervous system disorders
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to other quinolones
Directions:

Orbifloxacin tablets are enteric coated to hide the natural bitter taste. Hiding crushed tablets in the pet’s food will likely not be effective. Hand-pilling is likely necessary. After administration, watch the pet closely to ensure the entire dose was consumed.

Give on an empty stomach.

Give orbifloxacin 2 hours before or after any iron, dairy or calcium products.

Ensure there is water available for your pet to drink.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is usually given once daily.

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy. Finish the entire course of treatment.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store tablets in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

People should not take this drug. Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Not for use in food animals.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Pet owners who are allergic to quinolones (such as ciprofloxacin or norfloxacin) should avoid handling this drug as a photosensitivity reaction could occur with contact.

Potential side effects:

Decrease in appetite, fatigue, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea (high doses)
High doses in cats may cause soft feces and decreased body weight gains
Damage to joint cartilage in dogs <8 months="" of="">
Possibility of urine crystals in dehydrated pets
High doses of other fluoroquinolones in cats has reportedly caused blindness. Contact your veterinarian if your cat shows any signs of dilated pupils or any change in behavior.
Rare incidences of dizziness, seizures, depression, lethargy and nervousness
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with aminoglycosides, antacids, 3rd generation cephalosporins, clindamycin, nitrofurantoin, oral cyclosporine, probenecid, some penicillins, sucralfate, theophylline and medications containing aluminum, calcium, iron, magnesium and zinc.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, orbifloxacin should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about orbifloxacin. If you have any questions or concerns about orbifloxacin or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Oxazepam

General Description: Oxazepam is a tranquilizer similar in nature to diazepam (Valium®). In dogs and cats, it is often used to treat anxiety disorders, plus is used as an appetite stimulant in cats....

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General Description: Oxazepam is a tranquilizer similar in nature to diazepam (Valium®). In dogs and cats, it is often used to treat anxiety disorders, plus is used as an appetite stimulant in cats. Sedation and drowsiness are a common side effect. Since the smallest tablet or capsule available is 10 mg and your pet may need a fraction of this dose, your veterinarian may have a special product compounded by a pharmacy for his/her use. Follow the directions carefully.

What is this drug?

Oxazepam is a benzodiazepine tranquilizer
Oxazepam is given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Used to reduce anxiety disorders in dogs and cats
Used as an appetite stimulant in cats
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Use with caution in pets with liver or kidney disease or those with a history of seizures
Use with caution in older, debilitated animals, or those with certain types of glaucoma
If your dog has myasthenia gravis, oxazepam may make his/her symptoms worse
Use with caution in working dogs (military/police/seeing eye/hearing, etc.) as too much sedation may impede their ability to work and learn
Safety during pregnancy or lactation has not been established
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to oxazepam or other benzodiazepine medications (ex. Valium)
Directions:

To achieve the best results, give oxazepam 20-30 minutes before a meal.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is usually givenonce or twice daily.

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

Since the smallest tablet available is 10 mg and your pet may need a fraction of this dose, your veterinarian may have a special product compounded by a pharmacy for his/her use. Follow the directions carefully.

If your pet has a pre-existing seizure disorder and is receiving oxazepam, do not suddenly stop the medication as seizures may result.

Oxazepam is a controlled drug. You will need a new prescription every 6 months. Your veterinarian must keep special records of its use.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store oxazepam in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Sedation, drowsiness, incoordination
Cats: may experience irritability, depression, incoordination and difficult breathing at high doses
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with antacids, cimetidine, digoxin, erythromycin, flumenazil, isoniazid, ketoconazole, other CNS depressants (narcotics, barbiturates), phenothiazine, probenecid, propranolol, rifampin and valproic acid
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, oxazepam should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about oxazepam. If you have any questions or concerns about oxazepam or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Paroxetine

General Description: Paroxetine is an SSRI antidepressant drug used to treat various behavioral issues in pets. Disorders that may respond to paroxetine include: fear of noises such as thunderstorms, ...

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General Description: Paroxetine is an SSRI antidepressant drug used to treat various behavioral issues in pets. Disorders that may respond to paroxetine include: fear of noises such as thunderstorms, separation anxiety, self-mutilation (ex. excessive licking, hair pulling, etc.) and aggression.

What is this drug?

Paroxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant
Paroxetine is given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

To treat aggression, thunderstorm phobias, separation anxiety, plus various obsessive compulsive behaviors such as chewing and self-mutilation
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Pets also receiving drugs known as MAO inhibitors
Use with caution in those with heart, liver or kidney disease
Pets with a history of seizures
Safety in breeding animals is unknown
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to paroxetine or other SSRIs
Directions:

Paroxetine will be administered in conjunction with a positive behavior modification program. It is essential to follow the training plan as well as administer the medication, to achieve therapy success.

Give this medication with or without food, although giving with food may lessen any stomach upset.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is usually givenonce a day .

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Occasionally, your veterinarian may change the dose to achieve the best results.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

Do not give your dog aged cheese or wear a tick collar while on paroxetine.

Do not abruptly discontinue this drug. It will be necessary to slowly taper the dose over time to reduce unpleasant side effects and ensure your pet’s behavior does not return.

Baseline and periodic blood testing may be necessary to assess the pet’s health and response to paroxetine.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight. Do not remove the desiccant, if included.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Pet owners allergic to paroxetine and/or other SSRIs should avoid handling this drug.

Potential side effects:

Commonly, dogs lose their appetite, and subsequently lose weight. Tempt your dog with better tasting foods or hand feed until this side effect wears off. Report continued lack of appetite to your veterinarian.
Lethargy, drowsiness, upset stomach, anxiety, shaking, restlessness, panting, irritability, insomnia and hyperactivity
Some dogs lose their inhibitions while medicated and become aggressive
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with buspirone, cimetidine, diazepam, digoxin, encainide, flecainide, haloperidol, lithium, l-tryptophan, perphenazine, phenylbutazone, phenothiazines, propafenone, thioridazine and warfarin.
Paroxetine should not be used within 2-5 weeks of administering MAOIs (ex. amitraz, deprenyl, isoniazid, selegiline) or tricyclic antidepressants (ex. amitriptylline, clomipramine, imipramine)
Paroxetine should not be given with drugs that could increase the likelihood of seizures (ex. acepromazine, cloropromazine)
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet consumes more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, paroxetine should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about paroxetine. If you have any questions or concerns about paroxetine or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Phenobarbital

General Description: If your pet is experiencing frequent seizures, phenobarbital may be used as an effective control. Phenobarbital may be used alone or in combination with other drugs. Periodic...

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General Description: If your pet is experiencing frequent seizures, phenobarbital may be used as an effective control. Phenobarbital may be used alone or in combination with other drugs. Periodic blood testing will be necessary. Phenobarbital is available in 15 mg, 30 mg and 60 mg tablets.

What is this drug?

A barbiturate
Given by mouth, or by injection at your veterinarian’s office
Reasons for prescribing:

To control seizures in dogs or cats with epilepsy
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Breeding, pregnant or nursing pets
Use with extreme caution in pets with liver or lung disease
Use with caution in dehydrated or anemic pets, or those with Addison’s, heart or kidney disease
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to phenobarbital or other barbiturates
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. It is usually givenonce or twice a day and is usually given for the rest of the pet’s life. Seizures may reoccur if a dose is missed.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily.

When phenobarbital is started, allow 2-4 weeks to reach stable blood levels. Seizures may occur during this period.

Baseline blood work to assess your pet’s health before starting this drug is recommended. Periodic blood work to monitor the level of drug in the blood will be necessary. Dose adjustments will be made based upon the results and an assessment of how your dog is responding clinically.

It may take a week for the level of the drug to stabilize after a dose change.

Record the date, time, severity, length and circumstances of any seizure your pet has. Provide this information to your veterinarian in order to help him/her to best treat your pet.

Because this drug is a controlled drug, you will need a new prescription from your veterinarian every 6 months. Call ahead for refills.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can as missing even one dose can lead to a seizure. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Your pet will likely be tired when first prescribed phenobarbital. Some pets become agitated and anxious too. If these side effects do not disappear or get worse, contact your veterinarian.
Your pet may want to eat, drink and urinate more often
Your pet may stagger, seem depressed or sedated
May cause liver disease at high doses (especially in dogs). Liver enzymes should be monitored before and during therapy. If you notice jaundice (yellow gums, skin or eyes), let your veterinarian know.
Phenobarbital depresses breathing which may cause an oxygen shortage and cause pets to overheat
Many laboratory tests are affected by phenobarbital
Bone marrow suppression, anemias or low platelets are possible. Watch for weakness, pale gums or increased bleeding or bruising tendencies.
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with aminophylline, anticoagulants, antihistamines, beta-blockers, chloramphenicol, CNS depressants, corticosteroids, doxycycline, erythromycin, furosemide, griseofulvin, lysodren, metronidazole, NSAIDs, opiate agonists, phenothiazine, phenytoin, quinidine, rifampin, theophylline and valproic acid.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, phenobarbital should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about phenobarbital. If you have any questions or concerns about phenobarbital or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Pimobendan

General Description: Pimobendan is a cardiac drug used to treat dogs with congestive heart failure. Pimobendan helps strengthen the heart’s muscular contractions and dilates the blood vessels....

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General Description: Pimobendan is a cardiac drug used to treat dogs with congestive heart failure. Pimobendan helps strengthen the heart’s muscular contractions and dilates the blood vessels. Pimobendan is offered as oblong, half-scored chewable tablets in two sizes (1.25 mg and 5 mg).

What is this drug?

A cardiac drug (inodilator) given by mouth
Pimobendan opens the blood vessels that take blood away from the heart, thereby reducing the work the heart does to pump blood. Pimobendan also opens the blood vessels which return blood to the heart, reducing pressure on the heart
Often used in conjunction with other drugs
Reasons for prescribing:

Used to manage the signs of mild, moderate or severe congestive heart failure in dogs 6 months of age or older due to atrioventricular valvular insufficiency (AVVI) or dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM)
Increases the ability of the heart to pump blood more efficiently
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Pets with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, aortic stenosis, or any other condition where an increase in cardiac output is not recommended
Safety has not been evaluated in dogs less than 6 months of age, those with congenital heart defects, dogs with diabetes or other serious metabolic diseases, dogs used for breeding or pregnant or nursing dogs
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to pimobendan or like products
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. The dose should be divided into two portions and given 12 hours apart.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily.

May be used in an acute situation or used long-term.

Give this medication for as long as veterinarian directs. Do not skip doses or stop giving the medication without consulting your veterinarian.

Baseline blood work to assess your pet’s health before starting this drug is recommended. Periodic blood work to monitor its effect is also advised if long-term therapy is necessary. Dose adjustments will be made based upon the results and an assessment of how your dog is responding clinically.
Call ahead for refills.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has any congenital heart defects
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Pimobendan is not for use in humans. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Continue giving the medication but contact your veterinarian if your pet develops: decreased appetite, drowsiness, diarrhea, labored breathing, weakness, incoordination, behavior changes (anxiety, convulsions), excessive thirst and urination, and/or rapid heartbeat fainting, accumulation of fluid in the lungs or abdomen, and/or a cough
May increase the development of arrhythmias
Stop giving the medication and contact your veterinarian immediately if your pet has an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing, swollen lips/tongue/face), experiences scratching, sudden onset of diarrhea, vomiting, shock, seizures, pale gums and/or coma
Synthetic beef flavor is actually derived from pork. Use with caution in pets allergic to pork
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Treatment of congestive heart failure usually requires concurrent use of multiple medications. Pimobendan has been found to be safe for use with many cardiac drugs, including angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, diuretics and digoxin.
Possible interactions may occur with other positive inotropes, theophylline, pentoxyphylline, and drugs that are highly protein bound
Using beta-blockers (ex. propranolol) or calcium channel blockers (ex. verapamil) may decrease the effects of pimobendan
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, pimobendan should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about pimobendan. If you have any questions or concerns about pimobendan or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Ormetroprim and Sulfadimethoxine

General Description: Ormetoprim and sulfadimethoxine is an oral broad-spectrum antibiotic used in dogs to treat wounds and abscesses. This medication can be given with or without food. Ormetoprim and ...

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General Description: Ormetoprim and sulfadimethoxine is an oral broad-spectrum antibiotic used in dogs to treat wounds and abscesses. This medication can be given with or without food. Ormetoprim and sulfadimethoxine is available as 240 mg and 1,200 mg scored tablets.

What is this drug?

Ormetoprim and sulfadimethoxine is a broad-spectrum antibiotic
Ormetoprim and sulfadimethoxine is given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Used to treat skin and soft tissue infections (wounds/abscesses)
Used to treat urinary tract infections
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Do not use in cats
Breeding, pregnant or nursing animals
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to ormetoprim and sulfadimethoxine or like products before
Directions:

Ensure your pet has fresh, clean drinking water at all times.

If for some reason your pet requires an antacid, give the antacid 2-3 hours before or after giving ormetoprim and sulfadimethoxine.

Give this medication with or without food.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is usually giventwo or three times daily . Therapy is usually no more than 21 days.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. Missed doses reduce the effectiveness of therapy.

Give this medication for as long as your veterinarian directs. Finish the entire course of treatment.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store this medication in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Pet owners allergic to ormetoprim and sulfadimethoxine and/or other sulfonamides should avoid handling this drug.

Potential side effects:

Sulfa crystals in the urine. To lessen this effect, encourage your pet to drink plenty of fresh water while taking this medication.
Vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, facial swelling
Inability to produce adequate tears or ‘dry eye’ (increased blinking or discharge, eye rubbing)
Joint inflammation (arthritis, fever, muscle soreness)
Skin rashes and itchiness
Liver failure (nausea, yellowing of gums, skin, eyes)
Blood abnormalities (bleeding tendencies, pale gums, fatigue, or fever of 103-105° F)
Kidney damage (increased thirst and urination)
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with antacids, aspirin, blood thinners, methotrexate, phenylbutazone, phenytoin, probenecid and thiazide diuretics.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, ormetoprim and sulfadimethoxine should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about ormetoprim and sulfadimethoxine. If you have any questions or concerns about ormetoprim and sulfadimethoxine or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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Pancreatic enzymes

General Description: Pancreatic enzymes are used in dogs and cats for the treatment of pancreatic insufficiency disorder (PID) or maldigestion syndrome. The powder or tablets are given with each...

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General Description: Pancreatic enzymes are used in dogs and cats for the treatment of pancreatic insufficiency disorder (PID) or maldigestion syndrome. The powder or tablets are given with each meal.

What is this drug?

A collection of secretions (enzymes) from the pancreas (usually pork) that are given to pets whose pancreas has stopped functioning. These enzymes are needed to help digest fat, protein and carbohydrates.
Pancreatic enzymes are given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

To treat Pancreatic Insufficiency Disorder (PID)
To help your pet gain weight lost due to PID
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Pets allergic to pork
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to pancreatic enzymes or like products before
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully. Give the exact amount prescribed. It is given with each meal and is usually given for the life of the pet. Powder: Mix the prescribed dose in your pet’s food. If feeding dry food, moisten the food with warm water and then add the enzymes. Allow this mixture to stand 15-20 minutes before feeding your pet. Tablets should be given with each meal. Feeding several small meals a day is usually found to be most helpful. As your pet’s diarrhea improves, your veterinarian may decrease the dose to the least amount that prevents diarrhea and allows your pet to gain weight. Call ahead for refills.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can, regardless of feeding status. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If youR pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight. Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Inhalation of the powder can be irritating to both human and animal lungs and throats and may cause an asthma attack. Do not inhale this powder nor allow your pet to inhale the powder. Powder will burn or irritate skin on contact. Wash your skin or your pet’s skin immediately upon contact. Wash your hands after handling this product. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

If any of the following side effects occur, contact your veterinarian immediately: hives, difficult breathing, swelling (lips, tongue or face)
May cause mouth irritation if it hasn’t been mixed well with moistened food and allowed to stand
High doses may cause nausea, cramping, diarrhea or vomiting
If these symptoms persist or you notice anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with antacids, H2 blockers, proton pump inhibitors, vitamins or supplements.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

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Pentoxifylline

General Description: Pentoxifylline is used to enhance healing and reduce inflammation in non-healing skin ulcers. Blood flow is increased in areas that would not get enough blood. Tissues receive...

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General Description: Pentoxifylline is used to enhance healing and reduce inflammation in non-healing skin ulcers. Blood flow is increased in areas that would not get enough blood. Tissues receive more oxygen and circulation is improved. Pentoxifylline is available by prescription as 400 mg tablets.

What is this drug?

A synthetic xanthine derivative; a member of the methylxanthine class of drugs
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

To promote healing and decrease inflammation caused by skin ulcers (especially in Shelties and Collies)
To increase blood flow to areas not getting enough blood (ie. improve microcirculation)
To treat allergic reactions caused by physical contact with an allergen (ex. contact dermatitis)
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Safety in pregnant pets is unknown. Pentoxifylline enters mother’s milk, so should not be used in nursing mothers.
Those with pre-existing seizure disorders
Pets with an increased bleeding tendency (including cerebral or retinal hemorrhage)
Use with caution in pets with GI ulcers, liver or kidney insufficiency
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to pentoxifylline, theophylline or other xanthines including aminophylline and caffeine
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

This medication should be given with food.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed.

This medication is usually given two or three times a day.

Since the human medication may be too large for your pet to swallow, special capsules, medicated treats or a liquid may be compounded for your pet. If the medication is a liquid, measure the dose carefully.

Give this medication for as long as veterinarian directs. Do not skip doses or stop giving the medication without consulting your veterinarian.

Call ahead for refills.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight. Protect from freezing.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Stomach upset (ex. nausea, loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea). These effects may be reduced if the dose is given with food.
Restlessness or caffeine-type jitters, dizziness, fast heartbeat, stomach ache and possible seizures at high doses
Seizures can occur in patients with prior seizure history
If your pet shows any of these symptoms, is especially restless or you notice anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with cimetidine, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, orbifloxacin, theophylline, warfarin and other anticoagulants
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, pentoxifylline should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about pentoxifylline. If you have any questions or concerns about pentoxifylline or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Phenylpropanolamine

General Description: Phenylpropanolamine is used in dogs for long-term management of urinary incontinence conditions. This drug improves the tone of the sphincter muscles, particularly the urethra...

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General Description: Phenylpropanolamine is used in dogs for long-term management of urinary incontinence conditions. This drug improves the tone of the sphincter muscles, particularly the urethra and the bladder neck. Cystolamine capsules are available by prescription from your veterinarian.

What is this drug?

An adrenergic agent
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

For long-term management of urinary incontinence (urine leakage) in dogs by tightening the bladder sphincter muscle
May be used in combination with diethylstilbesterol (an estrogen)
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Dogs with glaucoma, prostate disease, overactive thyroid, diabetes, heart disease or high blood pressure
Pets taking MAO inhibitors (Mitaban® Dip, Preventic® Flea Collars, Anipryl®). Phenylpropanolamine should not be used within 2 weeks of their use.
Pregnant and nursing dogs
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to phenylpropanolamine or like products before
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. It is usually giventwo or three times a day and can be used long-term.

One dose should be given at bedtime to ensure that the drug lasts all night and the pet does not have accidents throughout the night.

Phenylpropanolamine can be extremely bitter and make your pet salivate or refuse treatment. You may want to hide this medication in some food. Do not crush Cystolamine capsules.

Ensure that your pet consumes the entire dose.

Do not give your dog aged cheese or use tick collars while taking phenylpropanolamine.

It may take several days of treatment before urinary incontinence improves.

This medication usually needs to be given long-term, but some pets may only need treatment for several months or seasonally.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

Call ahead for refills.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can or urinary incontinence will reappear. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight. Potency is lost after exposure to light.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Phenylpropanolamine was taken off the human market in 1999 because it caused extreme high blood pressure and strokes in some humans. There have been no reports of these effects in animals when used at normal doses.
Since it is a stimulant, your pet may experience restlessness, irritability, urine retention, high blood pressure, rapid heart rate and loss of appetite
If your pet shows any of these symptoms or you notice anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with beta-blockers, chlorpromazine, digoxin, ephedrine, epinephrine, halogenated anesthetic agents, nonsteroidal antiinflammatories, reserpine and tricyclic antidepressants
Do not use phenylpropanolamine within 2 weeks of using MAO inhibitors (Mitaban® Dip, Preventic® Flea Collars, Anipryl®, isoniazid)
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, phenylpropanolamine should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about phenylpropanolamine. If you have any questions or concerns about phenylpropanolamine or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Piroxicam

General Description: Piroxicam is an NSAID used in the treatment of various cancers in dogs and cats. Piroxicam is also effective against arthritis symptoms, but there are safer drugs available for...

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General Description: Piroxicam is an NSAID used in the treatment of various cancers in dogs and cats. Piroxicam is also effective against arthritis symptoms, but there are safer drugs available for this use. Piroxicam is available in 10 and 20 mg capsules.

What is this drug?

An NSAID
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Used mainly in dogs and cats to treat some types of cancer, ex. transitional cell carcinoma (a bladder cancer), mammary adenocarcinoma, etc.
Usually combined with other drugs
May be used to manage the pain, fever and inflammation associated with arthritis, but there are safer drug choices
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Do not use in patients with known kidney or liver disease or those with bleeding disorders, gastric ulcers or high blood pressure
Use with extreme caution in pets with severe heart disease
Use with caution in cats as there is little veterinary experience with this drug
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to piroxicam or other NSAIDs
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. It is usually givenonce a day or once every other day .

Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily.

Give piroxicam with food to reduce the chance of gastrointestinal issues occurring.

Baseline and periodic blood testing may be necessary to assess the pet’s health and response to piroxicam.

Call ahead for refills.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

If you notice a strong vinegar smell to the medication, do not use the product but have it replaced.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Stomach and intestinal ulcers, prolonged bleeding, loss of appetite, vomiting, dark and tarry bowel movements, diarrhea and peritonitis. Vomiting or diarrhea could indicate that your pet has gastric ulcers. Discontinue the medication and contact your veterinarian immediately.
Liver or kidney effects. Notify your veterinarian if you notice any change in your pet’s urinary habits.
False elevation of blood glucose levels
Humans report headache, dizziness, ringing in the ears, rashes and itchiness
If you see any of these symptoms or notice anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with ACE inhibitors (ex. benazepril, enalapril), anticoagulants, cisplatin, diazepam, digoxin, flunixin, furosemide, methotrexate, other NSAIDs, phenylbutazone, propranolol and steroids,
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, piroxicam should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about piroxicam. If you have any questions or concerns about piroxicam or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Praziquantel

General Description: Praziquantel is an anthelmintic (dewormer) to kill your pet’s tapeworms. This medication kills the types of tapeworms your pet may contract from fleas or rodents. Tablets may be...

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General Description: Praziquantel is an anthelmintic (dewormer) to kill your pet’s tapeworms. This medication kills the types of tapeworms your pet may contract from fleas or rodents. Tablets may be crumbled or mixed in the food. Fasting is not necessary. Praziquantel is available as chewable or regular tablets, or as an injection that can be given at your veterinarian’s clinic.

What is this drug?

An anthelmintic (dewormer) for dogs and cats
Given by mouth, or by injection at your veterinarian’s clinic
Reasons for prescribing:

To kill the common tapeworm in dogs and cats
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Praziquantel is safe to use in breeding and pregnant animals.
Puppies less than 4 weeks of age and weighing less than 2 pounds
Kittens less than 6 weeks of age and weighing less than 1.5 pounds
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to praziquantel or like products before
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully. Fasting is not necessary prior nor recommended. Tablets may be given with or without food. Ensure that your pet swallows all of the medication. The injectable form is given by your veterinarian in the muscle (intramuscularly) or under the skin (subcutaneously). A single treatment may be sufficient, but a second dose 2-4 weeks later is recommended if re-infection is likely. Re-infection is possible if there is a heavy, uncontrolled flea problem or if the pet eats mice or rabbits. If your animal has a large load of tapeworms, after treatment you may see them expelled with a bowel movement. Usually however, they are digested and will not be seen. Hookworms and roundworms may be observed in the feces a few days after treatment with a combination product. To maximize the benefit of deworming, it is best to treat all animals in the environment. Periodic fecal exams are recommended to monitor effectiveness and re-exposure to parasites. Some intestinal parasites can infect humans. Strict hygienic precautions should be observed when handling infected pets and their feces. Consult your veterinarian or family doctor to discuss how to prevent human infection and re-infection of your pet.

What if a dose is missed?

Not applicable

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight. Not for human use. Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

The oral form tastes bitter
Side effects are rare, but oral forms of praziquantel may cause drooling, drowsiness, loss of appetite, vomiting and diarrhea
Praziquantel injections tend to sting. Your pet may scratch at the injection site or cry immediately following the injection. Dogs may vomit and experience a brief period of incoordination. Some cats may experience weakness, salivation, vomiting, diarrhea, and a temporary loss of appetite.
If your pet shows any of the above symptoms, or you notice anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but some side effects occur more if using pyrantel pamoate combination products at the same time as organophosphate (found in some flea and tick products) or diethylcarbamazine (once-a-day heartworm preventives)
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

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Praziquantel + Pyrantel pamoate

General Description: Praziquantel + pyrantel pamoate is an anthelmintic (dewormer) to kill your cat’s tapeworms, hookworms and roundworms. Tablets may be given directly by mouth or mixed in the food. ...

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General Description: Praziquantel + pyrantel pamoate is an anthelmintic (dewormer) to kill your cat’s tapeworms, hookworms and roundworms. Tablets may be given directly by mouth or mixed in the food. Fasting is not recommended. Praziquantel + pyrantel pamoate is available in tablet form.

What is this drug?

An anthelmintic (dewormer) for cats
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

To kill the common tapeworm in cats
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Praziquantel + pyrantel pamoate are safe to use in breeding and pregnant animals.
Kittens less than 1 month of age or weighing less than 1.5 pounds
If your pet has had an earlier allergic reaction to praziquantel, pyrantel pamoate or like products
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

Fasting is not necessary prior nor recommended.

Tablets may be given with or without food.

Ensure that your pet swallows all of the medication.

A single treatment may be sufficient, but a second dose 2-4 weeks later is recommended if re-infection is likely. Re-infection is possible if there is a heavy, uncontrolled flea problem or if the pet eats mice or rabbits.

If your animal has a large load of tapeworms, after treatment you may see them expelled with a bowel movement. Usually however, they are digested and will not be seen. Hookworms and roundworms may be observed in the feces a few days after treatment with a combination product.

To maximize the benefit of deworming, it is best to treat all animals in the environment. Periodic fecal exams are recommended to monitor effectiveness and re-exposure to parasites.

Some intestinal parasites can infect humans. Strict hygienic precautions should be observed when handling infected pets and their feces. Consult your veterinarian or family doctor to discuss how to prevent human infection and re-infection of your pet.

What if a dose is missed?

Not applicable

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Not for human use. Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Side effects are rare, but oral forms of praziquantel may cause drooling, drowsiness, loss of appetite, vomiting and diarrhea
If your pet shows any of the above symptoms, or you notice anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but some side effects occur more if using pyrantel pamoate combination products at the same time as organophosphate (found in some flea and tick products) or diethylcarbamazine (once-a-day heartworm preventives)
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, praziquantel + pyrantel pamoate should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about praziquantel + pyrantel pamoate. If you have any questions or concerns about praziquantel + pyrantel pamoate or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Prednisone/Prednisolone

General Description: An oral anti-inflammatory agent used to treat many inflammatory, auto-immune and allergy conditions plus many other diseases. Prednisone/prednisolone tablets are available...

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General Description: An oral anti-inflammatory agent used to treat many inflammatory, auto-immune and allergy conditions plus many other diseases. Prednisone/prednisolone tablets are available through your veterinarian in many concentrations. For use in both dogs and cats.

What is this drug?

Members of the glucocorticoid class of hormones. This type of steroid breaks down stored resources (fats, carbohydrates and proteins) so that they can be used as fuel at times of stress. Glucocorticoids are naturally produced by the adrenal glands to prepare the body metabolically for physical exercise and stress.
Prednisone is activated by the patient’s liver into prednisolone. These products are considered interchangeable, although some cats are not efficient at the conversion and do better on prednisolone
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Used in dogs and cats as an anti-inflammatory for the relief of inflamed areas, to decrease swelling, redness, itching and allergic reactions
Used to treat multiple conditions including Addison’s disease, shock, spinal cord and brain disorders, insulin-secreting tumors or metabolic conditions associated with low blood sugar, some anemias, allergies, auto-immune disorders, certain types of colitis and kidney disease
To reduce blood calcium
Used in cancer chemotherapy
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Animals with a systemic fungal infection
Animals with some types of mange (mites)
Pets who have had seizures in the past
Pets with stomach ulcers, corneal ulcers, osteoporosis, high blood pressure, liver and kidney disease or congestive heart failure
Pets with serious bacterial or viral infections or gastrointestinal ulceration(s)
Pets with Cushing’s disease should only receive this medication during very stressful events
Do not use in pregnant animals or in breeding males
Use with caution in very young animals and diabetics
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to prednisone/prednisolone or like products before
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. If given just once daily, dogs usually receive glucocorticoid drugs in the morning, and cats receive it in the evening (this mimics their natural hormone cycles).

The prime objective of steroid therapy is to achieve a satisfactory degree of control with a minimum effective dose.

Your pet may start at a high dose and then have it reduced. Prednisone/prednisolone may be prescribed for several weeks or even months. Individualization of dosage and duration of treatment will depend upon your pet’s reaction to this drug.

It is important that the dose be tapered to an every other day schedule once the condition is controlled and the body can start to make its own cortisol again. Do not discontinue the drug abruptly.

Give oral forms with food to reduce the chance of stomach ulcers.

Periodic blood work to monitor this drug’s effect may be required if your pet is undergoing long- term therapy.

Call ahead for refills.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can, regardless of feeding status. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Most common side effects are increased thirst, appetite and urination. Your pet may have accidents and need to go outside or use the litter box more frequently. Discuss these side effects with your veterinarian as the dose may be lowered or another steroid could be selected.
This medication causes the kidney to conserve salt. This could be a problem in patients with congestive heart failure or other patients who require sodium restriction
May stunt growth if used in young, growing animals
May lower seizure threshold and alter mood and behavior
At high doses, this medication can cause birth defects early in pregnancy, be irritating to the stomach or cause higher than normal blood sugar levels
If your pet has received high doses, it should not be vaccinated without your veterinarian’s advice as the vaccine may not work or it may actually give your pet the disease you are trying to prevent
Less common side effects include weight gain, insomnia, panting, diarrhea, vomiting, elevated liver enzymes, pancreatitis and behavior changes
Serious side effects are not expected with routine use. When higher doses are used or if use is chronic (ie. longer than 4 months on an every other day schedule), the side effects and concerns become different. Watch for muscle loss, weakness, and the development of diabetes or Cushing’s disease. Typical signs of these diseases are increased thirst, urination, appetite. Cushingoid pets may develop thin skin, poor hair coat and a ‘pot belly’. Monitoring tests or changing therapy may be recommended.
High doses may lead to immune system suppression, making your pet more susceptible to infections. Contact your veterinarian if your pet has a fever (over 103ºF), painful or frequent urination, fatigue, sneezing, coughing or runny eyes
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with amphotericin B, cyclosporine, cyclophosphamide, erythromycin, estrogens, furosemide, insulin, mitotane, NSAIDS (aspirin, carprofen, deracoxib, etc), phenobarbital, phenytoin, rifampin, some vaccines and thiazide.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, prednisone/prednisolone should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about prednisone/prednisolone. If you have any questions or concerns about prednisone/prednisolone or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Propranolol

General Description: Propranolol is an oral beta-blocker used in dogs and cats to regulate your pet’s heart rate and to enable the heart to work more efficiently. It may also be used to decrease high ...

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General Description: Propranolol is an oral beta-blocker used in dogs and cats to regulate your pet’s heart rate and to enable the heart to work more efficiently. It may also be used to decrease high blood pressure. Propranolol is available as tablets, extended release capsules, oral solution and may be offered as a transdermal gel.

What is this drug?

Propranolol is a beta-blocker
Propranolol is given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Used to regulate your pet’s heart rate and cause the heart to work more efficiently
May also be used to decrease high blood pressure
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Use with care in pets with liver or kidney disease
Use with extreme caution in pets with heart failure or a very slow heart beat
Use with extreme caution in hyperthyroid pets
Use with extreme caution in animals with some types of lung disease (ex. asthma)
Use with extreme caution in pets taking digoxin
Since propranolol masks the signs of low blood sugar, it must be used with extreme caution in a diabetic pet
Pets known to have had an allergic reaction to propranolol or any other beta-blocker
Directions:

Propranolol may be given with or without food.

If using the transdermal gel, apply to the skin as directed by your veterinarian.

Give medication as directed by your veterinarian. This medication is usually givenone to three times daily.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time daily.

If this medication was specially compounded by a pharmacist for your pet, please be observant of the container’s expiry date.

Do not discontinue the drug abruptly or without directions from your veterinarian, as your pet’s condition may worsen.

Call ahead for refills.

What if dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store medication in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

More tired or depressed than usual
Very slow heartbeat
Worsening heart failure
Low blood pressure which could cause fainting, weakness or dizziness
Diarrhea
Difficulty breathing
Behavior change
Low or high blood sugar
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with antacids, anesthetic agents, cimetidine, epinephrine, furosemide, hydralazine, insulin, lidocaine, methimazole, other heart medications (digoxin, diltiazem, verapamil), phenobarbital, phenothiazines (tranquilizers), phenytoin, propylthiouracil, rifampin, succinylcholine, theophylline, thyroid hormones and tubocurarine.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, propranolol should only be given to the dog/cat for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

It is likely that your veterinarian will want to monitor your pet’s condition periodically.

This is just a summary of information about propranolol. If you have any questions or concerns about propranolol or for the condition it was prescribed, contact your veterinarian.

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S-Adenosylmethionine

General Description: S-Adenosylmethionine (SAMe) is used in pets to treat a variety of liver diseases. It may be used in combination with silybin to further support proper liver function. Numerous...

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General Description: S-Adenosylmethionine (SAMe) is used in pets to treat a variety of liver diseases. It may be used in combination with silybin to further support proper liver function. Numerous human brands are available and several reputable veterinary brands as well. Consult with your veterinarian to choose the best product for your pet.

What is this drug?

A natural biochemical produced from the amino acid called methionine
Protects and supports healthy liver function
May be used in conjunction with silybin, another nutraceutical product useful in managing liver disease
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

To support proper liver function
Improves glutathione levels (an antioxidant that protects cells from toxins)
Protects liver cells from cellular death
Repairs liver cells
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

If your pet has had an earlier allergic reaction to SAMe
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

SAMe is usually given once daily initially and may later be maintained long-term on treatments given every second or third day.

Give SAMe on an empty stomach to increase absorption (at lease one hour before or two hours after feeding). Do not split or break tablets, but give whole.

The length of administration depends upon the reason for prescribing SAMe. Acute or sudden onset conditions may show improvement within weeks. Chronic or long-standing conditions may require months or years of administration. Your veterinarian can best determine any dosage changes and duration of treatment.

Initial and then periodic blood testing can confirm reduction in your pet’s liver enzyme values and indicate improvements in liver health.

Nutraceutical products are not regulated by the FDA. As such, they have not been required to go through the same rigorous testing for efficacy that drugs undergo. There may be great variation in strength between brands or even between batches of the same brand. Yet there are many quality products on the market that are made by reputable companies. Consult with your veterinarian to choose a sound product for your pet.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

SAMe is sensitive to air and moisture. It is usually packaged in a blister pack. Leave them in the pack until ready to use. Do not break tablets.

Store in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Potential side effects:

This medication is usually well tolerated
Possibility of vomiting
If you notice anything unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, there are no known drug interactions with SAMe
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, SAMe should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about SAMe. If you have any questions or concerns about SAMe or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Praziquantel + Emodepside

General Description: A topical solution used to treat and control hookworm, roundworm and tapeworm infections in cats at least 8 weeks of age and 2.2 lb body weight. A single dose usually is...

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General Description: A topical solution used to treat and control hookworm, roundworm and tapeworm infections in cats at least 8 weeks of age and 2.2 lb body weight. A single dose usually is sufficient to treat a tapeworm infection, but two doses may be necessary for hookworms and roundworms. Available in 4-packs in 3 different sizes (based upon your cat’s weight).

What is this drug?

A dewormer for cats
Administered topically
Reasons for prescribing:

To kill the tapeworms, hookworms and roundworms in cats
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Cats less than 8 weeks of age or weighing less than 2.2 pounds (1 kg)
Safe use has not been established in breeding, pregnant or nursing queens
Use with caution in sick or debilitated cats
Use with caution in heartworm positive cats
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to praziquantel + emodepside or like products before
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

Using the appropriate size of tube for your cat’s weight, part the hair on the back of the cat’s neck at the base of the head. Squeeze the entire contents of the tube onto the skin.

Do not get this product in the cat’s mouth or eyes.

Do not allow the cat to lick the application site for one hour. In multi-pet households, keep animals separated to prevent licking of the application site.

A single dose should clear a tapeworm infection although a series of two doses may be necessary for hookworms and roundworms. If re-infection occurs, re-apply after 30 days.

What if a dose is missed?

Not applicable

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store at or below 77º F (25º C). Protect from freezing.

Not for human use. Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Protect children from contact with the application site for 24 hours while the product is being absorbed.

Pregnant women, or women who may become pregnant, should avoid direct contact with, or wear disposal gloves when applying this product.

People with known hypersensitivity to butylhydroxyanisole, emodepside or praziquantel should use extreme caution when applying this product.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

You may see stiff hair, a damp appearance of the hair, or a slight powdery residue at the application site. These effects are temporary and do not affect the safety or efficacy of the product.
There have been reports of application site reactions (hair loss, dermatitis, swelling, redness), salivation, scratching, lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, dehydration, staggering, loss of appetite, facial swelling, seizures, twitching and death
If your pet shows any of the above symptoms, or you notice anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, there are no known drug interactions with praziquantel + emodepside
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet is exposed to more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, praziquantel + emodepside should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about praziquantel + emodepside. If you have any questions or concerns about praziquantel + emodepside or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Praziquantel + Pyrantel pamoate + Febantel

General Description: Praziquantel + pyrantel pamoate + febantel is an oral anthelmintic (dewormer) to kill tapeworms, roundworms, hookworms and whipworms in your dog. Tablets may be given directly by ...

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General Description: Praziquantel + pyrantel pamoate + febantel is an oral anthelmintic (dewormer) to kill tapeworms, roundworms, hookworms and whipworms in your dog. Tablets may be given directly by mouth or offered in a small amount of food. Fasting is not recommended prior to or after treatment. This medication is available in three different tablet strengths (according to body weight).

What is this drug?

An anthelmintic (dewormer) for dogs
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

To kill the common tapeworm, roundworm, hookworm and whipworm in dogs
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Do not use products containing febantel in pregnant animals .
Dogs less than 3 weeks of age or weighing less than 2 pounds
If your pet has had an earlier allergic reaction to praziquantel, pyrantel pamoate or febantel or like products
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

Fasting is not necessary prior nor recommended.

Tablets may be given with or without food.

Ensure that your pet swallows all of the medication.

A single treatment may be sufficient, but dogs exposed to re-infection (from rodents) may need a program of regular treatment every 21-26 days.

If your animal has a large load of tapeworms, after treatment you may see them expelled with a bowel movement. Usually however, they are digested and will not be seen. Hookworms and roundworms may be observed in the feces a few days after treatment with a combination product.

To maximize the benefit of deworming, it is best to treat all animals in the environment. Periodic fecal exams are recommended to monitor effectiveness and re-exposure to parasites.

Some intestinal parasites can infect humans. Strict hygienic precautions should be observed when handling infected pets and their feces. Consult your veterinarian or family doctor to discuss how to prevent human infection and re-infection of your pet.

What if a dose is missed?

Not applicable

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Not for human use. Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

The oral form tastes bitter
Side effects are rare, but oral forms of praziquantel may cause drooling, drowsiness, loss of appetite, vomiting and diarrhea
If your pet shows any of the above symptoms, or you notice anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but some side effects occur more if using pyrantel pamoate combination products at the same time as organophosphate (found in some flea and tick products) or diethylcarbamazine (once-a-day heartworm preventives)
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, praziquantel + pyrantel pamoate + febantel should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about praziquantel + pyrantel pamoate + febantel. If you have any questions or concerns about praziquantel + pyrantel pamoate + febantel or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Primidone

General Description: Primidone is an anticonvulsant used long-term to reduce the frequency and severity of seizures and control epilepsy in dogs. Primidone is used in dogs only. Available as 250 mg...

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General Description: Primidone is an anticonvulsant used long-term to reduce the frequency and severity of seizures and control epilepsy in dogs. Primidone is used in dogs only. Available as 250 mg scored tablets by prescription from your veterinarian.

What is this drug?

An anticonvulsant
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

Used to control the frequency and severity of seizures associated with epilepsy in dogs
Also used to control seizures associated with various infections such as viral encephalitis and distemper
Rarely used in cats
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Dogs with pre-existing liver disease
Use with extreme caution in dogs suffering from conditions like dehydration, anemia, Addison’s disease, heart, kidney or respiratory diseases
Not for use in pregnant or nursing animals
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to primidone, barbiturates or like products before
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. It is usually giventwo or three times a day and can be used long-term.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily.

It is important not to skip doses as this may cause a seizure. Do not skip doses or stop giving the medication without consulting your veterinarian.

Primidone may be given whole, or crushed and mixed with food.

It will take several days to get a high enough level of this medication in the blood stream to control seizures. Monitor extra closely at this time. Blood levels will stabilize within 2-3 weeks.

Baseline blood work to assess your pet’s health before starting this drug is recommended. Periodic blood work to monitor its effect is also advised if long-term therapy is necessary. Dose adjustments will be made based upon the blood results and an assessment of how your dog is responding clinically. Blood will be drawn 4-6 hours after the morning dose was given. You may want to keep this in mind when you schedule your follow-up appointments.

Ensure that your pet has access to plenty of fresh, clean drinking water.

Call ahead for refills.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced liver or kidney disease now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Restlessness, anxiety, drowsiness, dizziness, increased appetite, thirst, fever, blurred vision, irregular back and forth movements of the eyes, nausea or vomiting
If your pet experiences an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing, closing of the throat, swelling of the lip, tongue, face, rash, or hives), contact your veterinarian immediately
Possible long term use effects: increased water consumption, urination and appetite, dermatitis and anemia
Liver damage is possible. Periodic blood tests may be advised to monitor liver function. Simultaneous administration of SAMe (S-adenosylmethionine) may be a good supportive supplement.
If these symptoms persist, your pet has additional seizures or you notice anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Yes, but possible interactions may occur with acetazolamide, beta blockers, carbamezepine, chloramphenicol, corticosteroids, coumadin, ethotoin, ethrosuximide, furosemide, griseofulvin, isoniazid, mephenytoin, methsuximide, metronidazole, phenytoin, rifampin, theophylline and valproic acid
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, primidone should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about primidone. If you have any questions or concerns about primidone or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Ranitidine

General Description: Ranitidine is a histamine blocking agent that is used in dogs and cats to reduce the amount of stomach acid produced and protect the gastrointestinal system from ulcers....

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General Description: Ranitidine is a histamine blocking agent that is used in dogs and cats to reduce the amount of stomach acid produced and protect the gastrointestinal system from ulcers. Ranitidine is used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, megaesophagus and many other conditions where the esophagus or stomach undergoes long-term irritation. Give ranitidine on an empty stomach. Ranitidine is available as an oral syrup and as tablets.

What is this drug?

A histamine blocking agent
Given by mouth
Reasons for prescribing:

To reduce the amount of stomach acid produced and protect against ulcer formation
Manages nausea, and encourages normal stomach and intestinal contractions (prevents pooling of food)
Used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, poisonings, parvovirus infections, and any disease involving protracted vomiting
Used in combination with long-term medications with stomach irritation tendencies
Used in the treatment of megaesophagus or other conditions where the esophagus is continually exposed to vomit/reflux/stomach acid
3-13 times stronger than cimetidine
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Avoid using while pet is nursing kittens/puppies
Use with caution in pets with heart, liver or kidney disease
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to ranitidine or like products before
Directions:

Give the exact amount prescribed and only as often as directed. It is usually giventwo or three times a day and can be used long-term.

Read and follow the label carefully.

Give on an empty stomach if at all possible. Food will decrease its effectiveness.

Give this medication for as long as veterinarian directs. Do not skip doses or stop giving the medication without consulting your veterinarian.

Call ahead for refills.

Ideally, give the medication at the same time(s) daily.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed, give it as soon as you can, regardless of feeding status. If it is time already for the next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to the normal schedule. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
Risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced digestive upset now or ever
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
If your pet is pregnant or nursing or if you plan to breed your pet
Storage and Warnings:

Store in a tight, light resistant, childproof container in a cool, dry place at room temperature away from heat and direct sunlight.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Possible side effects:

This medication is usually well tolerated (hence the reason they are ‘over the counter’ drugs)
Diarrhea
Possible liver disease. Liver enzymes should be monitored before and during therapy.
Worsening of existing heart rhythm problems (usually just with injectable ranitidine)
If these symptoms persist or you notice anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

Drugs that may interact with ranitidine are: procainamide and propantheline bromide.
If used with antacids, give ranitidine 2 hours before or after the antacid(s).
Itraconazole and ketoconazole may need their dose adjusted if they are given at the same time as ranitidine.
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet eats more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, ranitidine should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about ranitidine. If you have any questions or concerns about ranitidine or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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Selamectin

General Description : A safe and simple monthly topical medication to protect your pet from heartworms, fleas, sarcoptic mange, ear mites and ticks. Selamectin also kills roundworms and hookworms in...

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General Description : A safe and simple monthly topical medication to protect your pet from heartworms, fleas, sarcoptic mange, ear mites and ticks. Selamectin also kills roundworms and hookworms in cats. Because of the low-volume dosage size, the solution can be applied in one spot. It is non-greasy and quick-drying. Use Selamectin on dogs older than 6 weeks or cats older than 8 weeks of age. Selamectin is sold in packs containing 3, 6 or 12 single dose tubes. Your veterinarian will help you choose the pack best-suited to your pet.

What is this drug?

A parasiticide that fights both internal and surface parasitic infections
Applied topically
Reasons for prescribing:

Dogs: Kills adult fleas and prevents flea eggs from hatching for one month, prevent and control flea infestations; prevents heartworm disease; treats and controls ear mites, sarcoptic mange; control of tick infestations
Cats: Kills adult fleas and prevents flea eggs from hatching for one month, prevent and control flea infestations; prevents heartworm disease; treats and controls ear mites; treatment and control of roundworms and hookworms
What dogs/cats should not take this medication?

Dogs younger than 6 weeks of age or cats younger than 8 weeks of age
Sick, debilitated or underweight animals
Use with caution if pet’s skin is broken or irritated
Safe to use on breeding animals and on pregnant and nursing females
If your pet has had an allergic reaction to selamectin or like products
Directions:

Read and follow the label carefully. Reminder stickers are included to place on your calendar for each of the months following the date of the first dose.

At your veterinarian’s discretion, a blood test may be necessary to determine the presence of an existing heartworm infection in your pet.

Administer the entire contents of a single dose tube (or two tubes for dogs weighing >85 pounds) topically. Part the hair on the animal’s back at the base of the neck in front of the shoulder blades. Place the tube tip on the skin and squeeze the tube emptying the contents directly onto the skin in one spot. Ensure that the tube is empty. Do not massage product into the skin.

Do not give orally. Do not apply to broken skin or onto wet hair coat.

To maximize the effectiveness, do not bathe the animal or allow the pet to swim for 2 hours.

Call ahead for refills.

Flea control: Administer at monthly intervals starting one month before fleas become active until the end of flea season.

Heartworm prevention: Administer monthly year-round, or at least within one month after the first exposure to mosquitoes, and monthly thereafter until one month after mosquito season ends. If selamectin replaces another type of heartworm preventive, give the first dose within 30 days of the last dose of the previous product.

Ear mites: Administer once as a single dose. Some dogs may require a second monthly dose. Monthly use will control any subsequent infections. Cleaning the infested ears is recommended.

Sarcoptic mange in dogs: Administer once as a single dose. Some dogs may require a second monthly dose. Monthly use will control any subsequent infections.

Tick control in dogs: Apply monthly. In heavy tick infestations, complete efficacy may not be achieved in one dose. An additional dose may be administered two weeks after the first, with monthly dosing continued thereafter.

Roundworms and hookworms in cats : Apply once as a single dose. Humans can contract these parasites from animals. Ensure everyone in your household maintains good personal hygiene.

What if a dose is missed?

If a dose is missed and a monthly interval between dosing is exceeded, immediately apply selamectin and resume monthly dosing to reduce the opportunity for the development of adult heartworms. Do not give two doses at the same time.

What to tell/ask veterinarian before giving medication?

Talk to your veterinarian about:

When will your pet need to be rechecked
What tests may need to be performed prior to and during treatment with this drug
What are the risks and benefits of using this drug
Tell your veterinarian about:

If your pet has experienced side-effects on other drugs/products
If your pet has experienced any other medical problems or allergies now or ever
All medicines and supplements that you are giving your pet or plan to give your pet, including those you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of your pet’s medicines can be given together.
Storage and Warnings:

Store below 30°C (86°F).

Discard empty tubes in your ordinary household garbage. Do not expose to heat or flame.

Keep this and all medication out of reach of children and pets. Not for human use. May be irritating to skin and eyes. Wash hands after use and wash off any product in contact with the skin immediately with soap and water.

Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take this product.

Potential side effects:

Stiff hair, clumping of hair or hair discoloration, hair loss, skin irritation or a slight powdery residue may be seen at the treatment site. These effects are temporary and will not affect the safety or effectiveness of the product.
Side effects are rare, but may include decreased appetite, drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle tremors, fever and rapid breathing
If these symptoms persist or you notice anything else unusual, contact your veterinarian
Can this drug be given with other drugs?

There are no known drug interactions with selamectin.
Do not use with other topical flea and tick control products
If your pet experiences any unusual reactions when taking multiple medications, contact your veterinarian.
Overdosing?

Contact your veterinarian immediately if pet receives more than the prescribed amount.

What else should I know?

Notify your veterinarian if your animal’s condition does not improve or worsens despite this treatment.

As with all prescribed medicines, selamectin should only be given to the pet for which it was prescribed. It should be given only for the condition for which it was prescribed.

This is just a summary of information about selamectin. If you have any questions or concerns about selamectin or the condition it was prescribed for, contact your veterinarian.

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FIND US

Texas West Animal Health

16367 South FM 4,

Santo, TX 76472

Phone. 940-769-2222

Fax. 866-632-3365

Email. texaswestvet@gmail.com